.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Los Alamos National Laboratory

  • Numbers grow in lab incident

    The ongoing investigation into the discovery of accidental radiation exposure at the Los Alamos National Laboratory last Saturday has revealed that 18 lab employees were exposed, as well as one contractor.

    Earlier in the week, lab officials reported that about a dozen workers had been subjected to the radiological incident.

    However, officials also stressed no one was harmed, as the incident involved very low levels of radiation from a form of Technetium.

    “This is not the Technetium 99m that is used for medical isotopes. It is still a beta emitter, which occur naturally in the environment,” said Nancy Ambrosiano, public information officer for LANL. “The incident involved approximately the same radiation levels that occur naturally in bricks or stone flooring in the Southwest.”

    Ambrosiano also said “it’s important to note that the highest measured exposure is more than 10 times less than what is allowed by law.”

    The Department of Energy’s Radiological Assistance Program (RAP) teams have also just about completed determining where the contaminated employees went after being exposed to the radiological material.

  • Tauscher gains seat on governing boards

    Norman J. Pattiz, chairman of Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC (LLNS) and Los Alamos National Security, LLC (LANS), today announced that the Honorable Ellen O. Tauscher has been named as an independent governor on the LLNS and LANS Boards of Governors.
    The LLCs manage Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Livermore, Calif. and Los Alamos National Laboratory respectively, for the U.S. Department of Energy. The appointments take effect Sept. 17.
    Tauscher has also been appointed as a member of the LANS/LLNS Boards’ Mission Committee. The Mission Committee serves in an advisory role to review current and future national security issues and laboratory initiatives, capabilities and strategic plans to address these issues.
    “We are very pleased to welcome Ellen Tauscher to the Boards of Governors of LANS and LLNS,” Pattiz said. “Ms. Tauscher has a distinguished record as a seven-term member of Congress with expertise in national security matters, a former Under Secretary of State for Arms Control and International Security, and as an investment banker. She is respected by the national and international arms control communities, by members of Congress and by the business community. She will add greatly to our boards and the national laboratories.”

  • Workers exposed to radiation

    According to Los Alamos National Laboratory officials, about 12 employees were accidentally exposed to Technetium-99, a type of low-level radiation that travels fast, but is stopped by the clothing and skin. As of press time, LANL is determining when and how the exposure occurred.

    “They are investigating what exactly happened and how to accurately characterize it at this point,” said LANL Public Information Officer Nancy Ambrosiano.

    The dosage the workers received is approximately 10 times lower than the allowable amount of millirems by law and does not pose a public health threat, according to LANL officials.

    LANL officials are also saying that some of the employees apparently took the radiation home with them and a clean-up operation is now underway. As of late Monday afternoon, LANL officials could not say where the employees may have traveled after they left the lab.

    One place that was checked though was Chamisa Elementary School.  According to a statement on the school’s site, Chamisa was given the all clear sign, with no signs of contamination found.

    “We appreciate the thoroughness of the lab in assuring the safety of our students and staff,” said a statement on the site.

  • Tauscher gains seat on governing boards

    Norman J. Pattiz, chairman of Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC (LLNS) and Los Alamos National Security, LLC (LANS), today announced that the Honorable Ellen O. Tauscher has been named as an independent governor on the LLNS and LANS Boards of Governors.

    The LLCs manage Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Livermore, Calif., and Los Alamos National Laboratory in Los Alamos, respectively, for the U.S. Department of Energy. The appointments take effect Sept. 17.

    Tauscher has also been appointed as a member of the LANS/LLNS Boards’ Mission Committee. The Mission Committee serves in an advisory role to review current and future national security issues and laboratory initiatives, capabilities and strategic plans to address these issues.

    “We are very pleased to welcome Ellen Tauscher to the Boards of Governors of LANS and LLNS,” Pattiz said. “Ms. Tauscher has a distinguished record as a seven-term member of Congress with expertise in national security matters, a former Under Secretary of State for Arms Control and International Security, and as an investment banker. She is respected by the national and international arms control communities, by members of Congress, and by the business community. She will add greatly to our boards and the national laboratories.”

  • Plan B would require $800M

    A little more information has trickled out concerning the Los Alamos National Security LLC’s proposal for plutonium sustainment without the help of a new Chemistry Metallurgy Research Replacement facility.

    This is better known as Plan B when it comes to the CMRR project.

    NNSA and the Obama administration have made it known they want to defer the project for five years and the House and Senate appropriators on the Energy and Water committees agreed, zeroing out funding for the project.
    Defense committees, though, have pushed funding for the project in their budget proposals.

    It’s likely nothing will be decided until after the election and if that is the case the lab will continue to run on a Continuing Resoluation.

    In the meantime, NNSA and lab officials are ironing out details for Plan B as part of its plutonium strategy.

  • Laser research holds more promise for cancer treatment

    Scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory have observed for the first time how a laser penetrates dense, electron-rich plasma to generate ions. The process has applications for developing next generation particle accelerators and new cancer treatments.
    The results, published online Aug. 19 in Nature Physics, also confirm predictions made more than 60 years ago about the fundamental physics of laser-plasma interaction. Plasmas dense with electrons normally reflect laser light like a mirror. But a strong laser can drive those electrons to near the speed of light, making the plasma transparent and accelerating the plasma ions.
    “That idea has been met with some skepticism in the field,” said Rahul Shah of LANL’s plasma physics group. “We think that we’ve settled that controversy.”
    The team, which also included researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Quantum Optics in Garching, Germany and Queens University in Belfast, UK used the 200 trillion-watt short-pulse TRIDENT laser at Los Alamos National Laboratory to observe the transparency phenomenon at 50 femtosecond resolution. Until now, those dynamics have been witnessed only in computer simulations.

  • ECA peer exchange tackles environmental issues

    The Energy Communities Alliance (ECA) had a peer exchange in Los Alamos last week. It was the first time ECA has met here in more than five years.

    The main topic of discussion was environmental management (EM), although other issues of concern to the participants were also discussed in length.

    Seth Kirshenberg, executive director of the ECA, began a series of panel discussions Thursday with a summary of current issues.

    Kirshenberg reported that Congress is expected to pass a six-month continuing resolution until a new budget is passed, with provisions that could impact DOE communities.

    The main concern was a new limitation that prevents agencies from moving money around. In the past, Department of Energy Environmental Management (DOE-EM) had considerable flexibility in directing money to the most urgent environmental cleanup needs at each site.

    “The bottom line is, we don’t have that flexibility to move money between the major control elements if the CR passes as it is today,” Kirshenberg said.

  • Scientist gives his two cents on plutonium plan

    As in most public hearings regarding anything that has to do with the Department of Energy, activists were in attendance Tuesday to put in their two cents worth.

    That was the case at the Holiday Inn Express as they came out to let their feelings be known about the Draft Surplus Plutonium Disposition Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement.

    Interestingly enough, however, a Los Alamos National Laboratory scientist also stood up to give his opinion.

    Those occasions are rare.

    But David Clark was ready.

    “I’ve devoted my career to developing knowledge and expertise on the science and technology of plutonium,” Clark said. “I’ve come tonight as a citizen and a scientific expert on matters related to plutonium. As a leader in plutonium science, I remind everyone that there is well over 2,000 metric tons of plutonium throughout the world in various forms. 

    “Regardless of your views on how this situation came to be, it is clear that these large inventories must be prudently managed for many centuries and we must secure it against theft and diversion. To succeed, we will have to stabilize, store, and/or destroy excess plutonium. 

  • Astronomer enlightens audience

    Astronomer Alex Filippenko knows his audience. At the Duane Smith Auditorium Monday night, he wowed the crowd with his talk about dark matter, expanding universes and supernovae black holes — and even included a little extra

    “I gave more details tonight and went on longer than I usually do because I wanted to give this much more scientifically literate audience some more of the details,” Filippenko said. “When I give this lecture to a much more generalized audience, I leave out particular things because it confuses them; but I felt like I owed it to this particular audience.”

    But he also brought along his sense of humor, too. At one point during the lecture, he showed a wall of stars on his presentation screen and started to seriously tell the audience that dark matter is what you see between the stars. He then started to count the dark spaces in between the clusters of stars and galaxies before a ripple of laughter in the audience grew louder, signaling the jig was up.

    After that, though, things got serious as he described dark matter as something everyone should be paying attention to, whether award-winning astronomers or not.

  • Coalition adopts bylaws and looks for funding

    The Regional Coalition of LANL Communities adopted a pair of resolutions that will help it better conduct its business at a meeting last week in Española.

    Under the guidance of its new executive director DeAnza Valencia Sapien of the MVM Group, the coalition unanimously approved a resolution establishing the bylaws of the Board of Directors and established standards of reasonable notice to the public for all coalition meetings.

    Valencia Sapien was hoping to announce that the coalition would receive $100,000 in funding from the Department of Energy. “We should have it next month,” she said.

    A presentation was made to the coalition, concerning the radiological environmental monitoring around Los Alamos National Laboratory.

    David Fuehne, LANL’s team leader for environmental radiation protection, said there are 28 stacks continuously monitored and air is monitored at more than 50 AIRNET stations. Analysis is done for radioactive particulates including plutonium, americium, uranium, tritium and metals. Fuehne said more than 30,000 analyses were made in 2010.

    He said extensive wildfire monitoring was done after Cerro Grande, Taos and Las Conchas with more than 9,000 analyses. He also said there was “no-fire-related LANL effects measured at the laboratory perimeter or regional.”