.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Los Alamos National Laboratory

  • Protesters coming to LA

    With anti-nuclear groups coming to town Sunday and Monday to mark the anniversary of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombings, residents can expect a little more edge and passion to the protests and events, thanks to the national “Occupy” movement.

    “This year, we’ve had lots of participation because of the Occupy movement,” co- organizer Bud Ryan said. “This year, we have more than 30 volunteers helping us.”

  • More questions on PF-4

    The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board is keeping tabs on the Department of Energy, NNSA and the Los Alamos National Laboratory when it comes to the structural integrity of the Plutonium Facility (PF-4).

    In DNFSB’s latest letter, dated July 18, the board said an ongoing government analysis of the lab’s ability to withstand earthquakes may be flawed.

    The board used the term “technically inadequate” in several ways when it described the lab’s own analysis of how well PF-4 would hold up in a strong earthquake.

    The letter stated, “Timely action must be taken to fully understand if additional building modifications are required.”

  • Seen @ the Scene: Lab Picnic

    Hundreds turned out for the annual laboratory picnic with fun-for-the-family games, prizes, demonstrations and food. Free sno cones made life grand for children of all ages, while many participated in dancing and Zumba.

  • Plutonium disposition project possible

    The National Nuclear Security Administration has released the Draft Surplus Plutonium Disposition Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for public review and comment.

    And not surprisingly, Los Alamos could be in the mix.

    The Draft Supplemental EIS analyzes the potential environmental impacts of alternatives for the disposition of 7.1 metric tons (MT) of additional weapons-usable plutonium from pits that were declared surplus to national defense needs in 2007 but were not included in DOE’s prior decisions as well as 6 MT of surplus weapons-usable non-pit plutonium.

  • NNSA looks to impede nuclear threat

    WASHINGTON, D.C. — The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) has announced the approval of nearly $3 million in funding for collaborative research and development projects aimed at addressing nuclear security challenges.

    The projects, financed by NNSA’s Global Initiatives for Proliferation Prevention (GIPP) program, will be managed jointly through the intergovernmental International Science and Technology Center (ISTC), located in the Russian Federation, and the Science and Technology Center (STCU) in Ukraine.

  • DOE begins climate research at Cape Cod

    The Department of Energy today announced that scientists are beginning an air particles research initiative at Cape Cod National Seashore in Massachusetts designed to improve model simulations of the Earth’s climate system.

    Specifically, experiments will use dozens of instruments on the ground and in the air to measure cloud properties and tiny particles in the air, such as dust, soot and sea salt—referred to as aerosols.  Addressing the question of how aerosols interact with clouds and change over time will significantly improve the accuracy of computer models that simulate Earth’s climate system.  

  • Senators join CMRR chorus

    New Mexico Senators Tom Udall and Jeff Bingaman wrote letters Thursday to Defense Secretary Leon Panetta and Energy Secretary Steven Chu, expressing their concerns with the National Nuclear Security Administration’s decision to defer construction of the Chemistry Metallurgy Research Replacement facility.
    The letters, dated Thursday, detail consequences of delaying the beleaguered project for five years.
    The letters state:
    “• First, it will adversely impact our nation’s scientific capabilities, especially in analytical chemistry and materials characterization that are central to assuring the safety, reliability and performance of the nuclear deterrent.

  • Eight senators fight for CMRR

    Eight U.S. senators — six Republicans, a Democrat, and an independent— wrote a letter recently to Defense Secretary Leon Panetta, urging the resurrection of the Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Replacement project at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  • Wallace speaks to community leaders

    Terry Wallace, the principal associate director for global security at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, briefs community leaders at a breakfast at the lab Tuesday. Juan Griego, the deputy director at the Los Alamos Site Office, also gave a briefing. Afterward, leaders went on numerous tours at the lab.

  • Community water events take center stage later this week

    The theme for the community water events planned by the Communities for Clean Water is “Weaving Our Río Grande Communities Together.”  
    Three public education programs will be in Santa Fe and Española on Thursday and in Española on Friday.  The programs are free and open to the public.  
    On Thursday, 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., a Community Water Forum will be conducted at the Santa Fe Community Convention Center, located at 201 Marcy Street.  Its main topic will be the Buckman Projects and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL).