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Today's Features

  • The Los Alamos debut of concert pianist Natasha Stojanovska will be at 7 p.m. Friday in the Sanctuary of the Unitarian Church of Los Alamos, 1738 North Sage St.

    The performance is free to the public.

    Stojanovska, a Macedonian native, is a true world-class artist and has just moved to Los Alamos.

    She has performed solo and chamber music recitals in France, Portugal, Macedonia, Serbia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Romania, South Korea, Haiti, and the United States.

    Her performances have been broadcast on radio and television.

    Those who love piano repertoire will not want to miss her solo performance.

    On the program are pieces from Bach, Schubert, Chopin, Rachmaninoff, and one of Stojanovska’s.

  • Jemez Village is gearing up for its annual Jemez Mountain Trail Sale, which will happen at the same time people start coming from all over to see the fall foliage on the 132-mile Jemez Mountain Scenic Byway.

    This year, the sale will take place from 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Oct. 21-22.

    The village tries to hold the sale when the leaves are turning and the fall colors are at their peak. 

    The massive yard sale is more than 26 miles long. It starts at San Ysidro and continues past La Cueva.

    The Jemez Mountain Scenic Byway is more than 163 miles long and starts in Bernalillo and ends at Bandelier National Monument. 

    The Jemez Mountain Trail Sale is an annual event where food vendors, artists, craftsmen and yard sale sellers can set their wares out on the side of NM 4 for shoppers and sightseers.

    Items for sale range from handcrafted items, jewelry and artwork to used cars, furniture, books, appliances and knick-knacks. Pottery, art and handcrafted items from Jemez Pueblo along with fundraiser tables set up by churches, schools, and other organizations may also be available.

    In addition to the sales and bargains along the way, the view will be great everywhere one looks.

  • TODAY
    Today-Dec. 13 —
Forest Explorers Hike and Play from 1-3 p.m. at the Nature Center.
Get outside this fall by exploring with PEEC! This six-week class is for youth ages 5 to 8. Cost is $135 for non-members, $110 for PEEC members.

    Nature Loom Installation from 2-4 p.m. at the Nature Center. Discover Earth Art and use natural objects in artistic expression during this hands-on group art installation with Liz Martineau. Cost is $5 for members, $7 for non-members.

    Jemez House Thrift Shop at 13 Sherwood Blvd. in White Rock will have a bag day from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.  
    THURSDAY
     Nature on Tap: Bandelier Bird Banding at 5:30 p.m. at the Nature Center. Join in a discussion about the 2017 Bandelier bird banding experience with Bandelier biologist Sarah Milligan and bird banding interns Daniel Dorantes and Kim Geissler. Free. More information at peecnature.org.

    FRIDAY
    Gentle Walks
at 9 a.m. at the Nature Center. A gentle walk for which the emphasis is on discovery, not mileage gained. Free.

    Astronomy Show: Asteroid Threats at 7 p.m. at the Nature Center.
Join us to learn about asteroids: the close calls, current risk, and how we know what to expect. Cost is $6 for adults, $4 for children. More information at peecnature.org.

  • A Better Way for LA invites the public to attend a fall meeting on Monday, Oct. 16, at the Los Alamos Chamber of Commerce at 15th Street and Central Avenue. A light supper will be provided.
    The program begins at 7 p.m. with a talk by William Mead on the “History of Roundabout Decisions for N.M. 502 in Los Alamos County.”
    The planned roundabout at the intersection of Trinity Drive and Central Avenue will force drivers to travel in conflicting “circular” paths, negatively impacting both pedestrians and vehicles.
    Next, Heather Ortega will present a talk on “Neighborhood Associations: Helpful or Hurtful to Community Relations”. The Los Alamos County Council is proposing the use of public funds to form “voluntary” neighborhood associations.
    While they are intended to be an advocate for residents, there is the potential for fraud, abuse, harassment and onerous fines.
    Brady Burke will give concluding remarks. He recently announced his candidacy for the Los Alamos County Council.

  • Robert Altman’s acclaimed Western “McCabe and Mrs. Miller” (1971, rated R) will screen at 6:30 p.m. Thursday upstairs at Mesa Public Library.
    It’s winter in the Old West. John McCabe (Warren Beatty), a newcomer to town, partners up with Constance Miller (Julie Christie), a professional madam, who offers to use her experience to help McCabe with the business in exchange for a share of the profits.
    Success ensues. However, a large mining company, drawn by the town’s zinc deposits, wants to buy out McCabe along with the rest of the town. What will happen if he refuses?
    Christie received an Oscar nomination for her role, and the film was nominated for several other awards as well. In 2010, the Library of Congress selected “McCabe and Mrs. Miller,” which is based on the 1959 novel McCabe by Edmund Naughton, for preservation in the United States National Film Registry for being “culturally, historically or aesthetically significant.”
    Additionally, Leonard Cohen fans will be interested to know that the film’s soundtrack consists entirely of three of Cohen’s early works: “The Stranger Song,” “Sisters of Mercy,” and “Winter Lady.”

  • Visitors are invited to spend a fine autumn day in Frijoles Canyon at Bandelier’s annual Fall Fiesta from 11-3 Saturday at Bandelier National Monument’s Visitor Center.

    Each weekend through the summer, Pueblo cultural demonstrators showcase their work at the park.

    For the Fall Fiesta, all these artists are invited to come on the one day, sell their crafts, and talk with visitors.  In addition, it’s also a chance for the artists to visit with each other.

    Handmade items that are expected to be available include pottery, jewelry, drums, and carvings.  A Pueblo dance group is scheduled to present traditional dances several times during the day, and the Santa Fe Raptor Center is planning to bring their rescue birds.

    “We are very lucky to have these fine Pueblo artisans and demonstrators come and share their skills, knowledge, and beautiful work with us,” said Bandelier Superintendent Jason Lott. “Their stories and traditions go back in an unbroken line to their long-ago relatives here. Visiting with them helps the rest of us to make connections with the Ancestral Pueblo people who made their homes in Bandelier’s cliffs and canyons.”

  • Did you know that October is National Bullying Prevention month and the month also includes Unity Day?

    Unity Day is a day when we all wear orange, talk about bullying and try to make our community, however we define one, a little better. Check them out at pacer.org.

    Oct. 25 is the day for 2017, and I really hope community members will bring the message forward, in any way that works best for you.

    You can start something in whatever club, organization or community you claim or wear orange to bring awareness.

    Bullying can lead to really bad choices no matter what age, income bracket or community it seems to visit. I heard of a local story where someone was verbally assaulted at our Health Fair because of her apparel choice.

    I haven’t been able to speak with the person to verify the story, but what makes me even more sad is when I was told that no one came to the aide of the person under attack.

    If you see something, I beg you to please stand up. If you see something, say something or nothing will ever change. If we allow people to be ugly than ugly becomes the norm.

    I am always afraid that I may err on the crazy side and read someone the riot act, or at least I hope I would be the one to intervene.

  • Getting a new puppy, kitten, or older cat or dog is an exciting experience, but having pets comes with certain responsibilities, including potty training. It may be a time-consuming process to potty train your pet, but Dr. Mark Stickney, clinical associate professor at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, said it is necessary to develop a long-lasting, positive relationship with your pet.
    “Inappropriate eliminations are one of the biggest reasons pets are surrendered,” Stickney said. “Developing good bathroom habits early is key to having a pet you will enjoy for a long time.”
    Potty training should begin as soon as you bring your pet home. If you’re training an adult dog or a puppy, be sure to give them plenty of time to use the bathroom and stay with them until they go. Then, reward the animal with a treat or positive praise so they understand that eliminating outside is good behavior.
    If you’re training a kitten or cat, Stickney said finding a litter box that your pet is comfortable getting in and out of is key. Additionally, if your kitten was using a litter box before it came to live with you, it could be helpful to start potty training your pet with that specific litter.

  • The next Family Night at the Los Alamos Nature Center is Oct. 10.

    Enjoy an evening of games and hands-on activities with Mesa Public Library’s Melissa Mackey from 6-7 p.m. The Nature Center will be open for exploring the exhibits until 8 p.m.

    This October’s Family Night will be the last of the season to have a campfire and make s’mores, one of the most popular features of warm-weather Family Nights.

    And mark your calendars – the second Tuesday of each month is Family Night at the nature center.

    Thanks to a generous sponsorship from the Kiwanis Club of Los Alamos, this program is free for all. Next month’s Family Night will take place on Nov. 14.

    For more information about this and other programs offered by the Pajarito Environmental Education Center (PEEC), visit peecnature.org, email programs@peecnature.org, or call 662-0460.

  • The public is invited to join the Los Alamos Family YMCA for a panel discussion on “Attracting and Nurturing Volunteers: A Conversation,” from 5-6 p.m. Oct. 19 at the University of New Mexico-Los Alamos in the Lecture Hall, building 2.

    The discussion will be led by Diana Martinez, of the Los Alamos Family YMCA, and Todd Nickols, of the Los Alamos Historical Society.

    These are leaders of two local organizations with robust volunteer programs. The speakers will discuss the joys (and pains) of engaging the community in nonprofit efforts. Among the topics will be:

    • How to recruit and retain volunteers for your organization

    • Different ways to recognize the work of your volunteers

    • Identify resources for developing or strengthening your own volunteer program

    • How to engage youth volunteers

    • Recruiting volunteers to help with programming

    • Preparing for group volunteer activities.

    Martinez and Nickols will begin the discussion with their experiences and insights, but they hope to engage the audience with their questions and comments.

    Bring ideas and questions regarding this lifeblood of any nonprofit organization.