Today's Features

  • Aubrie Powell, of Los Alamos, a graduate of Los Alamos High School, has graduated Magna Cum Laude from Baldwin Wallace University in Berea, Ohio with a bachelor’s degree in music.
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    The following Los Alamos students will begin their first semester at Eastern New Mexico University in Portales this fall: Trisha Barks, John Dermer, Miranda Honnell, Lauren Mazuranich, Jacqueline Fernandes and Richard Morley.

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    Kendall Schneider and Mariah Zerr, of Los Alamos, have been selected to serve as President’s Ambassadors at Eastern New Mexico University.

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    Erik Bojorquez and Taylor Pomeroy, both of Los Alamos, were named Eastern New Mexico University counselors for Dawg Days 2015. Dawg Days is the annual back-to-school kickoff weekend that serves as a welcome to new students. The weekend’s events, including a foam party and community barbeque, are led by the Dawg Days counselors.

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  • To live in northern New Mexico is to be surrounded by rugged beauty. But what happens if a medical emergency happens out in the wilderness? Luckily Classic Air Medical, a helicopter medical transport service, is ready to help.
    Meet pilot Geoff Rodgers and the medical team at 7 p.m. Tuesday, to discuss the work of this helicopter rescue company and how they work with the local community.
    Rodgers is a former Los Alamos county councilor and current pilot for Classic Air Medical. He served as a pilot for both the U.S. Army and the U.S. Army Reserves, and also has experience flying for EMS, firefighting and powerline construction operations.
    Classic Air Medical began as Classic Tour Helicopters, a helicopter tour service operating around Bryce Canyon. Over the years, the increased need in emergency transportation and search and rescue operations led Classic Air Medical to change its focus from tourism to its current mission of emergency air transportation services. It serves not only New Mexico, but also Wyoming, Oregon, Colorado and Arizona.
    The talk will be at the Los Alamos Nature Center, 2600 Canyon Road. It is free to attend, and no registration is required. For more information about this and other PEEC programs, visit peecnature.org, email programs@peecnature.org, or call 662-0460.

  • Reminder: It is time to submit entries for the Friends of the Shelter Calendar. Do it online at calendar.lafos.org. If you have adopted a shelter pet, particularly a pet from the Los Alamos Animal Shelter, consider adding their photograph to the 2016 calendar.
    The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of adoptable pets just waiting for their forever home. Be sure to check out the Petfinder website for pictures of all adorable adoptable animals:
    SHELTER HOURS: Noon to 6 p.m. Monday – Friday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Saturday and noon-3 p.m. Sunday.
    Also, be sure to check out the website at lafos.org, to get more information about volunteering, adopting and donating.
    All adoptable pets are microchipped, spayed or neutered, and up-to-date on vaccinations.
    Cupcake — A 4-year-old, calico, who still learning about shelter life and slowly adjusting. She has a gorgeous coat that she would love to show off to new visitors! Young kids might be a bit too rambunctious for her, but she does enjoy the company of older children and adults. Cupcake is hoping that you’ll stop in so she can show you how sweet she is and take her home!

  • Fifty years ago a far-sighted, bipartisan group in Congress established the Land and Water Conservation Fund, which taps a fraction of the nation’s offshore oil and gas revenues to give all Americans a lifetime of outdoor recreational opportunity.
    Congress intended the fund to be used for “preserving, developing and assuring accessibility to … outdoor recreation resources … and to strengthen the health and vitality of the citizens of the United States …”
    Every state has benefited from the Land and Water Conservation Fund. It has built playgrounds and parks, improved hiking trails and campgrounds, and provided access to public land for the enjoyment of Americans of every age, background and place of residence.
    In fact, some of the first LWCF grants in New Mexico went to Los Alamos County nearly 50 years ago and used to develop Camp May Community Park.
    Other local projects have included ball field lighting, the comfort station at Overlook Park and improvements at Los Alamos Entrance Park.

  • As September arrives, we discover National Attendance Awareness Month and Los Alamos Public Schools is excited to engage the entire community as to the importance of good attendance.
    “School is more fun when you have good attendance,” said Dr. Kurt Steinhaus, Los Alamos Public Schools superintendent. “It is easier to understand the assignments, the learning makes better sense, you are caught up, there is more time to ask questions, you are able to ‘stay on top’ of the work and it is easier to make good friends.”
    As part of Steinhaus’ back to school welcome message, he reminded students and families of key items that are important to student success including taking care of yourself, getting involved, planning, making good decisions, asking for help when you need it, having a good attitude and being true to yourself.
    While the ideas are meant for students, the message could also apply to community members. When youth see adults with role model behaviors like taking care of themselves and having a good attitude, the lessons are absorbed like a sponge and can create behaviors or patterns for a lifetime.

  • Life-sized mannequins, piles of medical equipment and extensive checklists filled the testing room during the last day of University of New Mexico-Los Alamos EMT-Basic class recently as students endeavored to diagnose and treat their “patients.” They were taking practical and written tests to finish the 10-credit core course that enables them to sit for the National Registry Exam to be certified Emergency Medical Technicians or EMTs.
    The EMT certification is a stepping-stone to become a paramedic or other medical professional, and EMTs can work in pre-hospital environments, such as patient transport, fire departments and police departments. EMT-Basic is a core class of UNM-LA’s Associate of Science degree, and also serves students pursuing bachelors and medical degrees, or individuals who need emergency responder skills.
    “My test scenario was a man with shortness of breath having an anaphylactic reaction,” said student Holly Erickson, a junior at Clemson University in South Carolina, describing her final exam in EMT-Basic. “I found out he was allergic to peanuts and gave him epinephrine.”

  • The Los Alamos Co-op Market is holding a Harvest Festival Saturday to celebrate local food, including Colorado peaches and organic green chile from Seco Spice.
    Triny Vigil, the interim general manager will grill green chile cheeseburgers using local beef from Sweet Grass Co-op in Colorado. They will also offer veggie green chile cheeseburgers.
    Most activities will be from 11 a.m.-2 p.m. including chair massages by Trish Walk-Hopkins, from Mariposa Body, and the children’s bouncy house, donated by Little Forest Playschool.
    Dr. Wendy Van Dilla, of naturopathic physician and owner of Holistic Health Care will offer demonstrations of low-level laser therapy from
    9 a.m.- 2 p.m.
    In addition to food and relaxation, Tim Martinez, a local farmer from Velarde, will share his knowledge of farming in the Rio Grande Basin.
    For more information about the co-op’s Harvest Festival, visit the co-op’s website losalamos.coop.
    The Los Alamos Co-op Market provides the community with access to a wide variety of local, natural, and organic foods and can be found at 95 Entrada Dr.
    Check the website losalamos.coop, or call the co-op at 695-1579 for more information.

  • Baha’i Faith
    For information, email losalamosla@gmail.com. For general information, call the Baha’i Faith phone at 1-800-228-6483.
    Bethlehem Lutheran
    Bethlehem Evangelical Lutheran Church, a member of the ELCA, is located at 2390 North Road, 662-5151; see a map at bethluth.com. The Eucharist is celebrated each Sunday at 9:30 a.m. followed by fellowship time with refreshments starting at 10:45 a.m. Preceding worship is our Christian Education hour which begins 8:30 a.m. The preaching is biblical by our Pastors Bruce Kuenzel and Nicolé Ferry, the music is lively, children are welcome and abundant, and a well-staffed nursery is provided. All are welcome! Come Join the Family!
    Bryce Ave. Presbyterian
    The church is located at 3333 Bryce Ave. The Rev. Henry Fernandez preaches, bapca.org, info@bapca.org. For information, call 672-3364.
    Calvary Chapel
    Sunday school classes for all ages at 9:15 a.m. and worship at 10:30.  Our current series is “Kingdom Reign” as we study the book of 2 Samuel.
    The Christian Church
    92 East Road, 662-6468, lachristian.org. 9-10 a.m. Sunday school; 10-10:30 a.m. Coffee Fellowship; 10:30 a.m. Worship Service. Rev. Doug Partin, Assoc. Rev. Ben Partin.
    Christian Science
    1725 17th St. 662-5057.
    Church of Christ

  • “What does the Bible teach me about being ethical?” — Stephen

    What is “ethical?” The discipline of ethics seeks to define how one “ought” to act in a given situation.
    Classical ethical thinking considers the particulars of the cultural ethos, standards of commonly accepted behavior, and traditional values.
    Going deeper, ethics also seeks to identify the source(s) of authority that establish the rules of normative behavior.
    Ethics raises questions about the reality of objective truth, whether one can know the “highest good,” and how one chooses from among many options that which is right and best.
    One distinctive function of Scripture is that it portrays God, known most clearly in the person of His Son Jesus Christ, as the norm for thoughts, words and behaviors. He is the highest authority for what is ethical. He, not man, is the standard for what is ultimately good.
    The Bible goes on to paint a portrait of a humanity that is at least capable of choosing to act rightly. People, created in the image of God, possess intellectual, volitional, empathetic, relational and spiritual capacities (Gen. 1:26ff). We are, therefore, capable of being moral agents. To deny this capability and its attendant obligations is to deny our humanity.