Today's Features

  • “What does the Bible teach me about being ethical?” — Stephen

    What is “ethical?” The discipline of ethics seeks to define how one “ought” to act in a given situation.
    Classical ethical thinking considers the particulars of the cultural ethos, standards of commonly accepted behavior, and traditional values.
    Going deeper, ethics also seeks to identify the source(s) of authority that establish the rules of normative behavior.
    Ethics raises questions about the reality of objective truth, whether one can know the “highest good,” and how one chooses from among many options that which is right and best.
    One distinctive function of Scripture is that it portrays God, known most clearly in the person of His Son Jesus Christ, as the norm for thoughts, words and behaviors. He is the highest authority for what is ethical. He, not man, is the standard for what is ultimately good.
    The Bible goes on to paint a portrait of a humanity that is at least capable of choosing to act rightly. People, created in the image of God, possess intellectual, volitional, empathetic, relational and spiritual capacities (Gen. 1:26ff). We are, therefore, capable of being moral agents. To deny this capability and its attendant obligations is to deny our humanity.

  • Art exhibits
    The 11th Annual Gala Exhibition and Auction on display through Friday will showcase artists from across the U.S. and abroad who find inspiration in Fechin’s legacy, Taos and the creative traditions of the Southwest.

    Zane Bennett Gallery announces “IMPACTS! II” an exhibition featuring Bi Rongrong, Shen Fan, Liang Shaoji and others, with seven artists in total. The show is at 435 South Guadalupe St., across from the rail station in Santa Fe, and coincides with the Last Friday Art Walk in the Railyard Arts District. There will be events occurring during these openings involving traditional and contemporary Chinese culture, with more information to follow.

    “Where the Buffalo Roam.” Angel Wynn, American artist and photographer. Show runs through Aug. 31 at Angel Wynn Gallery in Santa Fe.

    Kathleen Doyle Cook, “Intensity in Abstraction.” Through Aug. 31 at the New Concept Gallery in Santa Fe.

    Michael Lange – Wald/Fluss. Friday through Oct. 17. Opening, artist reception, and book signing from 5-7 p.m. Friday at the photo-eye Gallery, 541 S. Guadalupe St. in Santa Fe.

    Solo Artist Show with Michael Andryc. “Sophisticated Primitive Art.” Through Aug. 31 at the Red Boot Gallery at Range Café in Bernalillo.

    ON PAC 8

    Views expressed on programs shown on PAC 8 do not necessarily reflect the views of the manager, staff, or board.

    Friday, August 28, 2015
    06:00 AM Democracy Now! – Live
    10:00 AM The Tom Hartman Program
    11:00 AM County Council Meeting –Replay 8-14-15
    02:00 PM United in Christ
    03:00 PM Road to Recovery
    04:00 PM Uprising
    05:00 PM Democracy Now!
    06:00 PM “Inflationary Cosmology – Is Our Universe Part of a Multiverse?”
    07:00 PM Los Alamos Historical Society – “New Mexico in World War II”
    08:00 PM The Garage
    08:30 PM Bongo Boy Rock and Roll
    09:00 PM Bandelier National Monument Naturalization Ceremony
    10:30 PM FMP Live
    12:00 AM Free Speech TV

    Saturday, August 29, 2015
    Free Speech TV

    Sunday, August 30, 2015
    06:00 AM FSTV
    05:30 PM Key to the Kingdom
    06:00 PM Drawing Men to Christ
    07:00 PM United Church
    08:15 PM Los Alamos Non-Profit Spotlight
    08:30 PM Trinity on the Hill
    09:30 PM Generations
    11:00 PM That Which Is
    12:00 PM Free Speech TV
    Monday, August 31, 2015
    06:00 AM Democracy Now! LIVE
    10:00 AM The Tom Hartman Program

  • Teatro Paraguas launches its 12th season with a premiere production of Santa Fe playwright Alix Hudson’s play “Our Lady of Mariposas.” The show runs Sept. 3-13 at Teatro Paraguas in Santa Fe.
    The play builds a story of a family in southeastern New Mexico around the massive die-off of monarch butterflies in the winter of 2002.
    Manuel (played by Jason Jaramillo), an immigrant from Mexico, is trying to raise his 7-year-old daughter Esperanza (played by Maya Sanchez) alone after his wife, Estrella, has inextricably disappeared. The only clue to her whereabouts are cryptic postcards without return addresses posted from different cities.
    The play unfolds as a memory play related by Esperanza as a grown woman (played by Rosario Roybal). The next-door neighbor in the run-down apartment complex, Kate (played by Liza Frolkis), tries to help the father and daughter as they wait and hope for Estrella’s return. The three are also waiting for the return migration from Mexico of the monarch butterflies. The cast is rounded out by Manuel’s work buddies, Dave (played by Tomás Rivera) and Eulogio (played by Rick Vargas). Guitarist JoJo Sena de Tarnoff performs original music throughout the play. The cast are regulars from other Teatro Paraguas productions.

  • Author Dr. David Stuart, one of the foremost experts on Chacoan culture, brings his latest discoveries to Mesa Public Library Thursday as part of the monthly Authors Speak series. The talk will take place at 7 p.m., Thursday, in the Upstairs Rotunda at Mesa Public Library.
    Stuart is an internationally recognized anthropologist whose most cited books are “Prehistoric New Mexico,” “Anasazi America,” “The Guaymas Chronicles,” and the recently released, “Ancient People of the Pajarito Plateau.”
    He earned his Ph.D. in anthropology from the University of New Mexico and he served many years at UNM as associate provost for academic affairs.
    Stuart has been a lecturer at SAR and in Edinburgh, London, Mexico City and at the Sorbonne in Paris. He is also the author of “The Ancient Southwest: Chaco Canyon, Bandelier and Mesa Verde” and “Pueblo Peoples on the Pajarito Plateau: Archaeology and Efficiency.”
    “Anasazi America: Seventeen Centuries on the Road from Center Place,” draws parallels between the decline and fall of Chacoan civilization and the culture of the first world today. Stuart has researched the economic, public health and agricultural indicators, and has come to the conclusion that the inhabitants of Chaco failed to adapt to rapid growth.

  • This time of year always excites me for what lies ahead.
    As you read this, Los Alamos County Council will have proclaimed the month of September as Assets In Action month, which kicks off a yearlong journey of asset building.
    Asset building for our youth is so very important and it is something that needs to begin at a young age and continue throughout high school. We as a community need to engage our youth and help grow into great adults.
    So when groups talk about what we are doing for youth and are we running enough programs, I say unless they contain the relationship building work of Assets throughout the program, the gains are small in comparison.
    Now back to Assets month! On Sept. 4, the community is asked to wear their favorite college or university shirt, or one that supports their branch of service.
    Our love of lifelong learning happens in many ways and in many places.
    Snap a photo of yourself, your co-workers, etc., and email it to Assets@att.net.
    Our annual Change for Change collection to benefit the Community Asset Awards will be at Morning Glory Bakery, Finishing Touch, Aspen Copies, Chamber of Commerce, Children’s Clinic, the Los Alamos Co-op Market and the Animal Clinic of Los Alamos.

  • Today

    Game Night: 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. every Wednesday at the Mesa Public Library in the Upstairs Rotunda.


    Los Alamos Farmers Market. 7 a.m.-12:30 p.m. at the Mesa Public Library parking lot.

    United Blood Services Blood Drive. 11 a.m.-7 p.m. at at the First Baptist Church Hall 2200 Diamond Dr. For more details contact United Blood Services at 1-877-UBS-HERO. Donors can enjoy an egg salad, ham, or turkey sandwich.

    Downtown Dogs is a weekly walking group. All dogs and their humans are invited to walk from Pet Pangaea, 158 Central Park Square for a stroll around Downtown Los Alamos. 7 p.m. Come prepared with a standard leash, no longer than 6 feet.

    Authors Speak Series. David Stuart. 7 p.m. at the Mesa Public Library upstairs rotunda.


    Quiet, Gentle Walks. Join Sue Watts for a gentle walk along a relatively flat trail. The walks range from 1-2 miles and may include gentle changes in elevation. Each walk includes 20 minutes of silent walking. Free. Meets every Friday at 8:30 a.m. at the Nature Center. Check peecnature.org for any changes.

    United Blood Services Blood Drive. 11 a.m.-7 p.m. at at the First Baptist Church Hall 2200 Diamond Drive. For more details contact United Blood Services at 1-877-UBS-HERO. Donors can enjoy an egg salad, ham, or turkey sandwich.

  • One of the most popular bands in Los Alamos County, the Red Elvises, entertained the crowd at the Relay for Life event Friday night at Ashley Pond.

  • The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of adoptable pets just waiting for their forever home, so come adopt a new best friend today! Be sure to check out the Petfinder website for pictures of all adorable adoptable animals:
    SHELTER HOURS: Noon to 6 p.m. Monday – Friday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Saturday and noon-3 p.m. Sunday.
    Also, be sure to check out the website at lafos.org, to get more information about volunteering, adopting and donating.
    All adoptable pets are microchipped, spayed or neutered, and up-to-date on vaccinations.
    Cupcake — A 4-year-old, calico who was recently surrendered. She is still adjusting to life at the shelter; as a result, she is a bit timid and shy. Shelter volunteers will continue working with Cupcake to bring out her fun side, and she’ll be ready for adoption in no time!
    Marshall — A 1-year-old, orange tabby, who was found roaming earlier this week. He’s really hoping that his family comes for him, but if not, he’ll head to the vet for a check-up before he heads home with a new family.