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Today's Features

  • The Los Alamos Historical Society will host an evening under the stars starting at 6:15 p.m. Sept. 5 at Fuller Lodge. The fundraising event, which is black-tie optional, will include a three-course dinner, the society’s annual Experience Auction and dancing to the music of the Los Alamos Big Band.
    Tickets are $75 each, and many of the 120 available have already been sold. Only a few ticket remain for an exclusive pre-party wine and cheese reception, which begins at 5:30 p.m. at the Hans Bethe House on Bathtub Row. Tickets for both the gala and reception are $125. The public can also take advantage of the opportunity to meet and speak with the first recepient of the annual Los Alamos History Award.
    Tickets are available through the Historical Society’s website at losalamoshistory.org (click on the link to the gala on the right side of the screen) or by check to P.O. Box 43 in Los Alamos. Reservations must be made by Friday.

  • Dawn Brown of Big Brothers Big Sisters of Northern New Mexico spends a good deal of time during the summer thinking of the new school year and the number of students that could use an adult friend in their life.
    “As the Los Alamos Rio Arriba regional director I reach out to the communities for volunteers, youth for our program, regional board development, public speaking engagements, PR, fundraising and event planning,” Brown said.
    Brown oversees the site-based and community-based programs, which match “bigs” and “littles” for as little as 45 minutes per week or up to six to eight hours per month.
    The one-to-one mentorship programs only vary in the amount of time an adult is available to mentor a local youth. The Northern New Mexico BBBS program offers training, and works hard to match adults and youth based on common goals and activities.
    These relationships help to build a child’s skills, confidence and increase the chances of them staying in school,” Brown said. “A positive role model in a youth’s life helps increase the chances that a child will be able to overcome adversity and lead a successful life.”
    Brown also wants volunteers to know that the relationships are nurtured and supported by their degreed and professionally trained program staff.

  •  

    Today

    A chapter of The Compassionate Friends will meet on the fourth Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. on the northeast side of the new YMCA Annex, Central Park Square, suite 140. Co-led by Eric Ferm and Valerie Wood. The organization offers non-denominational grief support after the death of a child. Bereaved parents and grandparents are welcome regardless of age. For more information visit compassionatefriends.org. 

     

    The Great Books discussion group is now called Mesa Readers. The group meets from 1 to 3:30 p.m. on the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month at Mesa Public Library. The group chooses selections that interest its members and selects books and short stories that meet participants’ choices. All are welcome. For more information, call Mary Cernicek at 662-7100.

  •  

    As we come to the time for open house at the high school and middle school levels, I encourage you to attend and see everything the sites have available.

    On occasion, I hear parents say that they have attended them in the past and know everything they need to know about the schools.

    As each student is different, there is so much new to learn about, things to see and people to meet.

    If you haven’t been to the middle school yet, you are in for a treat. You’ll have a chance to roam the halls and see how much has truly changed for the Hawks.

    The high school has so much in store too, new staff members, new programs and so much to offer students each and every year.

  •  

    Mexico is one of the most biologically and culturally diverse countries in the world. These two categories, culture and nature, have gone hand-in-hand throughout history in Mexico: nature being fundamental to Mexican cultural development, and vice versa. There will be a free presentation 7 p.m. Wednesday at the Pajarito Environmental Education Center. 

    Two interns from Mexico, currently working at Bandelier, will take you back in time for an overview of how Mexican culture has changed throughout the years in its relationship with nature. The presentation will explore the impact of modern society on biodiversity, as well as outline some recent conservation efforts to save the natural beauty of Mexico.

  • The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of adoptable pets just waiting for their forever home, so come adopt a new best friend today! Be sure to check out the Petfinder website for pictures of all adorable adoptable animals:
    petfinder.com/shelters/friendsoftheshelter.html
    SHELTER HOURS: Noon to 6 p.m. Monday – Friday and 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. weekends.
    Also, be sure to check out the website at lafos.org, to get more information about volunteering, adopting and donating, as well as read up on some of your favorite animals and learn more about special needs animals or cats and dogs currently in foster care.
    All adoptable pets are microchipped, spayed or neutered, and up-to-date on vaccinations.
    CATS
    George, Abby and Maddie — They are older and declawed, who were surrendered when their owner’s health prevented her from keeping them. The shelter is working on getting to know them, so keep an eye out. The shelter hopes they will be sent out together if possible — $35 for two or $70 for all three!

  • ALBUQUERQUE – Three University of New Mexico School of Medicine students completed their first year in medical school this summer by helping Los Alamos residents with their health and wellness through mid-August at two sites in Los Alamos that include a family medicine clinic and medical center.
    More than 100 first-year UNM medical students began their six-week rural rotation this month in 22-plus communities throughout New Mexico, from Las Vegas to Las Cruces; Gallup to Clovis.
    As part of their nationally recognized curriculum, the students are talking with patients, conducting physical examinations with their preceptors, and performing a community project designed to address specific community health care and/or educational needs.
    Through the UNM School of Medicine’s Practical Immersion Experience (PIE), medical students are placed in outlying primary care practices — predominantly family medicine practices, but also internal medicine practices and occasionally rural emergency rooms — to experience medical practice in New Mexico’s rural communities.

  • Several robotics teams from Los Alamos gathered at the Bradbury Science Museum on Friday to show off their handmade robots. In attendance were Project Y from Los Alamos High School, FIRST Robotics team from UNM-LA, FIRST Lego Atomic Phoenixes, FIRST Tech Challenge from Los Alamos Middle School and the Radioactive Fireflies. 

  • Aug. 24-30, 2014
    For information, call the Betty Ehart Senior Center (BESC) at 662-8920, the White Rock Senior Center (WRSC) at 662-8200 and “Day Out” (adult day care, 8 a.m.-4 p.m.) at 661-0081. Reservations must be made by 10 a.m. for daily lunches.
    Betty Ehart
    MONDAY
    8:45 a.m. Cardio
    11:30 a.m. Lunch: Chicken Caesar salad
    12:15 p.m. AARP Smart Driver course
    7 p.m. Ballroom dancing
    TUESDAY
    8:45 a.m. Variety training
    11:30 a.m. Lunch: Hot dog
    1 p.m. MindBody massage
    1:30 p.m. “Friends” meeting
    7 p.m. Bridge
    7:30 p.m. Table tennis
    WEDNESDAY
    8:30 a.m. LAVA Quilters
    8:45 a.m. Cardio Plus Exercise
    10:45 a.m. Music with Ruth
    11:30 a.m. Lunch: Pork roast
    Noon Lunch talk: Guest from Aging & Disability Resource Center
    1:30 p.m. Daytime Duplicate Bridge
    THURSDAY
    8:30 a.m. Walk-in-the-woods
    8:45 a.m. Variety training
    11:30 a.m. Lunch: Tilapia
    1:30 p.m. Beginning tap dancing
    2 p.m. Ballroom dancing
    6:30 p.m. Chess
    7 p.m. Bridge
    FRIDAY
    9:15 a.m. Line Dancing
    11:30 a.m. Lunch: Spaghetti and meatballs
    12:30 p.m. Movie: “From Russia with Love,” 1963
    1-4 p.m. Shuffleboard

  • The Los Alamos Historical Society wants to thank the community for their continued interest and support of discussions of WGN’s TV series “Manhattan.” Here are some of the common questions we heard at the discussion of the fourth episode this past Sunday and on social media. Every week the society will be updating a bulletin board in the museum to continue exploring questions and reactions as the 13-episode series continues. Previous episodes are discussed on the website, losalamoshistory.org, on our Facebook page, and in the museum.
    Join the Los Alamos Historical Society Sundays at Time Out Pizzeria in Los Alamos from 7-9:30 for a viewing and discussion of “Manhattan” (TV-14 rating).
    Were Los Alamos doctors Army doctors?
    Yes, Los Alamos was served by an Army hospital. Originally staffed by one doctor and three nurses, the hospital grew to include a radiologist, pediatrician, dentists, an internist who had to enlist in the Army to accept the invitation to join the staff, a pharmacist, lab technicians, more nurses, and an Great Dane/Russian wolfhound mutt named Timoshenko who looked after the front steps.
    Where did they test explosives?
    Explosives tests were carried out at sites on current LANL property, such as the Gun Site. These sites were only a few miles away from the Tech Area.