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Today's Features

  • The Pajarito Players will present free staged readings of the play “Still in the Game” by local playwright Robert F. Benjamin, an upbeat family drama about aging with grace, courage and humor.

    The readings will be at 1:30 p.m. Feb. 3 and 11 at the Los Alamos County Libraries.

    Following the performances audiences can participate in a talkback with director, cast and playwright.  Also, the library will provide a display of library books related to the play’s themes.

    In the play, David, who is recently widowed, strives to restart his life. His adult daughter Dawn lashes out at him for romancing. After his fling ends, he tries speed-dating, where he meets Ruby (60s), garbed in her new emotional care-wear.

    Sparks fly when David’s eccentricity undermines Ruby’s insistence on protocol.  Years later, David’s relationships with Dawn and Ruby take unexpected turns as he grapples with end-of-life issues. En route to tour a residential hospice, a wacky encounter with a policewoman complicates his plan. Where can he best find peace and spirituality while staying closely connected with loved ones?

    The performance features local actors Pat Beck, Dianna Duerre, Trish Ebbert, Tom Farish, Namrata Menon, and Kate Ramsey.

  • The Pig + Fig Cafe will welcome Kurt Beitler, owner and winemaker at Bohème Winery at 6 p.m. today.

    The restaurant will serve a five-course dinner with pairings from the wines from the Bohème winery, including the 2014 Boheme English Hill Vineyard Chardonnay and the 2013 Bohème Old Mancini Ranch Zinfandel and three different Pinot Noirs.

    These wines aren’t available in New Mexico. Beitler is travelling to New Mexico to represent Bohème in the Taos Winter Wine Festival, where he plans to meet distributors in the state. 

    Laura Crucet, Pig + Fig Café’s executive chef and owner, said she is pleased to introduce Beitler to her customers and present these wines.

    “These wines are very fresh and approachable. Their pinot noirs are especially delightful,” she said.

    Tom Hill, a local wine enthusiast who helps plan the wine dinners at the Pig + Fig said, “Across the board, the wines are outstanding...but in a more refined and elegant style than a typical in-your-face California style favored by many winemakers. The Syrah is a classic cold-climate Syrah with a lot of peppery character.

    The Zin, a one-off production, comes from the very old Mancini Ranch in the Russian River Valley along Olivet Lane. I think you will be impressed.”

  • By Debbie Stone

    Special to the Monitor

    St. Augustine, Florida, is a treasure trove of historical attractions. The city has more than 60 points of interests, including Ponce De Leon’s Fountain of Youth Archaological Park.

    Visitors can enjoy the city’s many attractions but with all of this activity, it is a good time for sustenance. Not to worry, St. Augustine’s got you covered. Restaurants and bars dot the city and surrounding areas, offering a variety of cuisines.

    Head to intimate and trendy Catch 27 for some of the most delectable seafood in town. The establishment prides itself on preparing and serving fresh, locally caught seafood, and everything is made from scratch.

    Another special place is Michael’s Tasting Room, which emphasizes fresh, local and seasonal Spanish and Mediterranean inspired creations. This St. Augustine gem resides in a converted historic home dating back to 1764. Also memorable is lunch at Café Alcazar. This elegant eatery is situated in the Lightner Museum in a space originally designated for the largest indoor swimming pool of the Hotel Alcazar. The menu emphasizes entrees made from the freshest ingredients, local and organic.

  • The public is invited to the program of the Summit Garden Club at 1:30 p.m. Tuesday at the United Church, 2525 Canyon Road. 

    Gillian Sullivan, owner of Flowers by Gillian (flowersbygillian.net/index.html) will provide information on treating flowers from the gardens or florist.

    She will also demonstrate how to use unusual vases and containers for flower arrangements. If you have a vase or container you would like to use for an arrangement, bring it or a photo to the meeting for an opportunity to have Gillian’s input. 

    The public is invited to attend and learn more about the Summit Garden Club, participate in the program and enjoy refreshments.  For more information, contact Susan Larocque 695-0378 fdlsjl@yahoo.com or Shelby Redondo 662-2625 redondo@cybermesa.com, co-presidents of the Summit Garden Club. 

    Included among the club’s projects are maintaining gardens at the Bandelier National Monument and the White Rock Community Garden (across the highway from the Visitors Center).

    The Summit Garden Club is a member of the New Mexico and National Garden Clubs. The mission of the NGC is to provide education, resources, and national networking opportunities for its members, to promote the love of gardening, floral design, and civic and environmental responsibility.

  • Talking about money is one of the trickiest conversations for couples.

    A workshop is set for Saturday at projectY cowork Los Alamos that aims to empower individuals to hear each other’s values and bring their actions into alignment. 

    Financial Coach Pi Luna and Relationship Coach Nameh Marsin will offer practicals for developing a budget as well as gaining insights for what can help partners reach consensus.

    The workshop will be from 1-4 p.m. Saturday at projectY cowork, 150 Central Park Square, Los Alamos.

    The cost is $39 for individuals or $59 for couples. To register, visit bringlovefinances.eventbrite.com.

    Participants will receive a copy of Pi Luna’s book “Budgeting Basics” with the class.

    Some of the topics covered at the workshop will include how personal values will lead to spending habits. Couples will learn how to communicate with their partners around differences and find common ground.

    Attendees will also learn how to build a budget to bring objectivity and clarity to relationships and create long-term financial goals with partners.

  • The February Brown Bag Performance will feature Juanita Madland, who will perform classical piano compositions.

    To the delight of Los Alamos audiences, Madland will present a program of music by composers Chopin, Granados, Brahms, Schumann, and Schubert. The program will conclude with a special rendition of a composition by Juanita and David Madland. Mary Helen Klare, violinist and educator, will join Madland in a reading of her poem about Glenn Gould.

    The Los Alamos Arts Council invited the public to join them from noon-1 p.m. Feb. 7 in the Pajarito Room at Fuller Lodge for this special free performance. Donations are accepted.

    Los Alamos Arts Council has been presenting the free Brown Bag Performances to audiences, who enjoy the warm acoustics and atmosphere of Fuller Lodge, almost every month since 1973. Join them in supporting talented performers by spending your lunch period every first Wednesday of the month at the Lodge.

    For more information, call 663-0477, or visit LosAlamosArtCouncil.org.
     

  • SUBMITTED TO THE MONITOR

    Students, small businesses and other community members and groups in northern New Mexico will benefit this year from a recent, nearly $1.9 million grant from Los Alamos National Security, LLC (LANS), which is the managing and operating contractor for Los Alamos National Laboratory.

    The LANS Board of Governors approved the funding through Oct. 1 to support education, economic development and community giving in the region.

    “The board’s decision continues their legacy of positive community support that totals $34.8 million since 2006,” said Laboratory Director Terry Wallace. “This commitment allows us to continue to work with organizations across the region, magnifying the impact of our employees generous support of nonprofits.”

    Funds approved by the LANS Board of Governors are administered through a Community Commitment Plan managed by the Laboratory’s Community Partnerships Office.

  • I love when the student becomes the teacher!

    Occasionally, we need our eyes opened by a child, so we can see clearly and know there is hope for the future.

    Last week, a friend shared a wonderful, heart warming story with me. While I didn’t witness the story with my own eyes, I did verify it myself, before sharing it with you.

    A very young teenage boy witnessed what he believed to be someone treating a special education student in an unkind manner. The student mustered the fortitude to call the person he thought was being ignorant, on their handling of the situation.

    The person was then equally ignorant to the young boy, probably never dreaming their actions would be called into question. The boy replied a second time in defense of the special education student.

    The next time I crossed paths with the young man, I asked if he indeed stood up to the person in question. He cast his eyes downward as if he were about to be reprimanded by me.

    I smiled and while trying not to choke on the huge frog in my throat, I told him how very proud I was of him.

    You see, what I haven’t shared with you is that the young man stood up to an adult for being too harsh. He did it not once, but twice.

  • The Valle Grande Chapter, National Society Daughters of the American Revolution will meet on Feb. 10 at the Betty Ehart Senior Center from 10 a.m.-noon.

    This month’s program will feature the New Mexico State President, Children of the American Revolution, Samantha Streseman.

    Streseman will speak about her state project, and provide information about other NM C.A.R. activities.

    DAR is a service organization open to women who can prove descent from a Patriot during the American Revolution.
    For more information on the DAR, visit the National website dar.org.”