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Today's Features

  • March 19-25
    For information, call the Betty Ehart Senior Center (BESC) at 662-8920, the White Rock Senior Center (WRSC) at 672-2034 and “Day Out” (adult day care, 8 a.m.-4 p.m.) at 661-0081. Reservations: by 10 a.m. for lunches.
    Betty Ehart

    MONDAY    
    8:45 a.m.        Cardio
    8:30 a.m.        Tax Preparation
    9:45 a.m.        Pilates
    10 a.m.         Senior Civic Discussion
    10 a.m.        LARSO Advisory Council
    11:30 a.m.        Lunch: Taco Salad
    6 p.m.        Argentine Tango Dancing
    7 p.m.        Ballroom Dancing
    TUESDAY
    8:30 a.m.        Mac Users Group
    8:45 a.m.        Variety Training
    10 a.m.        Computer Users
    11:30 a.m.        Lunch: Salisbury steak
    1 p.m.        Bingo
    1 p.m.        Party Bridge
    7:30 p.m.        Table Tennis

  • The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of adoptable pets just waiting for their forever home, so come adopt your new best friend today! All adoptable pets are microchipped, spayed or neutered, and up-to-date on vaccinations. Shelter hours are noon – 6 p.m. Monday through Friday, 11 a.m.–4 p.m. Saturday, and noon–3 p.m. Sunday.
    Be sure to check out the website at lafos.org, to get more information about volunteering, adopting and donating. Also check out Petfinder website for pictures of adoptable animals: petfinder.com/shelters/friendsoftheshelter.html.
    CATS
    Fernando—A young white and orange kitty who loves lounging the day away. This friendly male is currently in a larger kennel that has a “cat hammock” hanging inside – he loves lounging in it! He can be a bit picky about his feline friends, so he might need a little bit of time to warm up to new companions.
    Mr. Whiskers—A big tabby cat that is about 4 years old. Changes are a bit stressful for him, so he will likely need a little bit of time to adjust to his new home. He can be independent, but he’s also very sweet and likes to snuggle when he’s in the mood! He is okay with mellow cats, but other dominant males sometimes bother him.

  • Although the idea of your pet having surgery can be scary, spaying and neutering is a common practice performed by veterinarians that can be beneficial to both you and your pet. In fact, the decision to spay or neuter your pet may be the best decision for your pet’s overall health.
    Dr. Mark Stickney, clinical associate professor at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, explained the benefits of spaying and neutering.
    “Spaying is the removal of reproductive organs in female dogs and cats,” Stickney said. “Spaying has a few general benefits, such as owners not having to tend to heat cycles or surprise litters of puppies or kittens. Benefits to neutering male pets—or removing the testicles – include decreased urine marking and aggression toward other males. In addition, neutered male pets are less likely to roam, a behavior that typically occurs when females of the same species are in heat. Roaming also puts your male pet at risk for getting lost, hurt, or injured by a car. Spaying and neutering also helps combat pet overpopulation.”

  • Melissa Savage, the author of “Rio: a Photographic Journey down the Old Rio Grande,” will speak at 7 p.m. at Mesa Public Library Thursday.
    Savage is a conservationist, geographer, professor emerita with UCLA, and director of the Four Corners Institute in Santa Fe. Her book is comprised of historical photographs of the Rio Grande, which are accompanied by essays written by people who are closely associated with the history of the river.
    UNM Press describes the book as: “The dynamic Río Grande has run through all the valley’s diverse cultures: Puebloan, Spanish, Mexican and Anglo. Photography arrived in the region at the beginning of the river’s great transformation by trade, industry and cultivation. In RIO, Melissa Savage has collected images that document the sweeping history of that transformation – from those of 19th-century expeditionary photographer W. H. Jackson to the work of the great 20th-century chronicler of the river, Laura Gilpin.”
    The Authors Speak program at Mesa Public Library provides a unique opportunity to meet prominent authors from the region. The readings and conversations take place on the fourth Thursday of each month, upstairs at Mesa Public Library. The Authors sell and sign books after the talks.

  • By Mandy Marksteiner

    Marksteiner:  How did you first come up with the idea for LAMOA?

    Tatter: My mother was living in a condo in Los Alamos and one of her neighbors was a gentleman who had an incredible art collection. He had been collecting for a long time and was looking for a place to put it.

    Los Alamos needs to have this place where these collections can go. There’s a scientific history here that has been well documented, but there's a cultural history that goes along with this of art and artists who've been here from the beginning.                                                                                                              

  • Join Ming Franz, an International Artist Magazine's recent grand prize winner, will teach a splash color workshop at the Fuller Lodge Art Center this weekend.

    The class will be from 9:30 a.m.-4:40 p.m. Saturday and Sunday.

    Beginning with ancient black-and-white splash, the class will evolve into marbling splash and then abstract splash using liquid watercolor, acrylic, and Asian ink.

    The foundation of this painting process is based on principles originating in Tang Dynasty China with a technique, known as PoMo. Essentially the artist freely "splashes" liquid color onto stacks of dampened sheets of mulberry paper. After the sheets dry, they are separated and the real magic begins.

  • National Kick Butts Day activities will be Wednesday at Los Alamos High School.
    The LAPS Prevention Office is working with the Campaign for Tobacco Free Kids to encourage young people to kick the habit or to avoid using tobacco.
    The high school Robotics Department and the Art Department have created a visual display to “Destroy Tobacco” which will take place during lunch-time activities.
    Free tobacco cessation programs are also available for students and staff members and information can be accessed by calling Bernadette Lauritzen in the Prevention Office at 663-3252.

  • Feb. 21 — A boy. Ira Daniel Weis. Born to Danielle Hauck and Eric Weis.
    Feb. 22 — A boy. Jared Smidt. Born to Esther and Joe Smidt.
    Feb. 25 —A girl. Ginny Lynn Williams. Born to Anna and Dwigth Williams.
    March 3 — A girl. Olivia Lake Parish. Born to Amanda Babicke and Mychael Parish.

  • “Fresh Out” is a 12-minute comedy by local playwright, Robert F. Benjamin. The comedy will be performed by Pat Beck and Kate Ramsey at 12:45 p.m. Wednesday at the Betty Ehart Senior Center. The performance is free and will include a “talkback” after the show.
    “Fresh Out” is a wacky, evocative comedy. Since Ruby, who is in her late 60s, became a widow several years ago, she’s had several brief romances. When another fling is about to collapse, she is at a crossroads. Should she continue to wallow in regrets about failed romances or embrace a new perspective on late-in-life companionship? Can Ruby become energized to take on a fresh approach to courtship? Of what use are regrets, anyway? What can seniors do about regrets?

  • The LAPS Healthy Schools Initiative invites parents, teachers, and community members to join a Community Book Read sponsored by 100+ Women Who Care and the Los Alamos Public Schools Foundation.
    LAPS staff meet regularly in professional learning circles to read and discuss the latest developments in educational research and practice. These book groups have been supported by the LAPS Foundation and other generous funders. The Healthy Schools Initiative is offering this opportunity to the community.
    The first selection is the book “How to Raise an Adult: Break Free of the Overparenting Trap and Prepare Your Kid for Success by Julie Lythcott-Haims.” Having spent 10 years as Stanford University’s Dean of Freshmen, Lythcott-Haims served as an advocate for young adults.
    In her work and her personal life, the author saw first-hand how our best intentions can prevent children from developing the skills they need to thrive, she said. The book includes a discussion of the pitfalls of overhelping our children as well as practical suggestions for raising resilient adults.