Today's Features

  • A slight cool breeze in the air means that we’re headed back to school. There was clearly genius behind in the first person to suggest starting on a Thursday.
    I confess, I didn’t understand the logic at first, but everyone is exhausted by Friday! The students, the staff, the custodians that spent the summer putting a sheen on those floors that makes one feel like they’ve crossed an ice rink.
    Then we get a small break and the routine begins. The day after the first day of school, I overheard someone say, “There are just 197 more to go.”
    There’s beauty in having routine. It will be followed by football games, clubs and organizations coming back together, the homecoming game and, ah yes, fundraising.
    The getting back to the grind is hard for some, so remember a dose of patience and look for positivity in everything or looking for the positivity in anything.
    There’s a great website called “Every Monday Matters” that offers little doses of inspiration, some suggestions for inspirational perspiration activities and more.

  • Thursday, as the class of 2020 enters the building at LAHS, many local parents are sending their freshmen off to college and university near and abroad.
    Our second oldest son Spencer, and other locals including Bradley, Evan, Lane and Holly are headed to Eastern New Mexico University, in Portales.
    This was our first child to go away to school. That time between walking that graduation stage as a ‘Topper and pulling out of the driveway as we headed to Greyhound territory went very fast.
    Friends would ask how I was doing with preparations and truthfully my answer was, pretending it is not happening.
    As the Assets person in town, I was beyond elated when as we pulled up to Eddy Hall on campus, a band of merry makers descended upon us in music, song and overall glee. They encouraged the parents to remain in the car so they could park while they assisted the newest members of the school to their rooms – potentially 625 of them.
    It was a swarm of hands and hearts as we had to make sure our own suitcase and the tools that normally stay in the vehicle weren’t swept along, too.
    We whispered good luck, see you soon and in a flash they were gone.

    Green Hour Hike at 9 a.m. at the Nature Center. Join other families for a kid-centered hike on the Las Conchas Trail. Admission: Free.
    Nature Yoga at 6:30 p.m. at the Nature Center. Practice yoga with Christa Tyson at the nature center, where you have a great view of nature. Admission: $15/non-member, $12/member.
    Gentle Walks at 8:30 a.m. at the Nature Center. A gentle walk for which the emphasis is on discovery, not mileage gained. Free. More information at peecnature.org.

    Astronomy Show at 7 p.m. at the Nature Center. Explore our universe from the comfort of the planetarium. Cost is $6 for adults, $4 for children.
    Bird Walk: Burnt Mesa Trail at 7 a.m. at the Nature Center. Observe local birds while quietly hiking Burnt Mesa Trail. See description at peecnature.org for cost.

    Feature Film: Black Holes at 2 p.m. at the Nature Center. Voyage through the galaxies in search of answers to explain the riddles of black holes! Cost is $6 for adults, $4 for children.

  • Have you journeyed into the never-ending world of fractals? Pajarito Environmental Education Center’s dynamic fractal show is back for one evening this month at 7 p.m. Aug. 26 in the Los Alamos Nature Center Planetarium.
    This show incorporates math, science, art, and nature in a full-dome planetarium show featuring original music.
    This spectacular show starts promptly at 7 p.m. and seating is limited.
    Tickets may be purchased by phone or at the nature center and are only $10 for adults and $8 for children.
    This fractals show will run on the fourth Friday of each month, and is suitable for audiences ages 4 and up.
    For more information about this and other Pajarito Environmental Education Center (PEEC) programs, visit peecnature.org, email programs@peecnature.org or call 662-0460.

  • Students of Los Alamos County in grades 4-12 are invited to enter the second annual Constitution Day Essay Contest.
    The cash prizes are $300 for the high school winner, $200 for middle school and $100 for the winner from grades 4-6. Entry is free and judging is blind.
    The contest is sponsored by the Los Alamos Federated Republican Women, and all students are invited to enter.
    The awards ceremony will be Sept. 24 at the Constitution Day Dinner, sponsored by the Republican Party of Los Alamos.
    Winners will be notified by Sept. 14, and will be invited to bring one guest and attend the dinner at no cost. The winners will be invited, but not required, to read their essays at the dinner.
    The Constitution Day Essay Contest is designed to challenge students to learn more about the Constitution and to express original, thoughtful ideas in essay writing. Essays will be judged on how completely and clearly the ideas are stated and supported. Grammar, spelling and punctuation will also be considered. For more information, including the essay questions, go to losalamosgop.com.

  • This is the time of year when secretly I may be singing to myself, Andy Williams, It’s the most wonderful time of the year.
    I have never been fond of heading back to school, because I enjoy being at home with my kids. However, I do enjoy seeing everyone else’s children again. I miss those faces during the summer.
    I remember being a first grade parent outside the door and being so excited to see everyone again.
    I want to encourage everyone to start the year on a positive note. Try to find kind and encouraging words to say and start off on a positive note because it really does set the tone for the day.
    If you have seventh grader or a freshman, make sure they attend the orientations planned for them at Los Alamos Middle and High School. More than 125 students and countless adults have spent many hours in leadership training to welcome them and ease their transition.
    One reason I love the WEB and Link Crew programs is that they are grounded in the 40 Developmental Assets framework.
    Make sure you attend open house events, meet key people, hear important information and demonstrate to your children that parent engagement matters. They to see you care, so they care too.

  • The movie “Granite Mountain” will return to Los Alamos this week to film scenes on Camp May Road, the Justice Center, the detention center and private residences in Los Alamos and White Rock. The film and staging will take place at the following locations and times:
    • Sullivan Field Parking Lot—will be closed from 6 a.m. Monday through 9 p.m. Friday for staging of 10-12 large film trailers. Public access will be around the perimeter of the parking lot, including the dumpsters.
    • Camp May Road, Camp May, Pajarito Mountain and resort facilities will be closed from 6 a.m. Wednesday to 9 p.m. for filming.
    Elizabeth Gabel casting agency is still accepting applications for paid extras for the scene being filmed on Camp May Road on Wednesday. Anyone interested in applying should email a photo with name, height, weight and phone number to egabelcasting@gmail.com, and include the year, color, and make of their car. Put “Los Alamos” in the subject line.
    • White Rock Overlook Point will be closed beginning on Thursday at 9 a.m. AM through Saturday at 5 p.m.
    • The Justice Center will be the site of filming scheduled for Friday beginning at 6 a.m. to approximately 5 p.m. During that time, the Justice Center will be open, but there will be no public access to the second floor of the building.

  • July 18 —A boy. Michael Douglas Keen. Born to Courtney Fortran and Christopher Keen.
    July 7 —A girl. Cecilia Charlotte. Born to Suzi and RJ Montaño.
    July 28 — A girl. Novalee Maxine. Born to McKenzie Bailey and Chase Enterline.


  • Aug. 7-13
    For information, call the Betty Ehart Senior Center (BESC) at 662-8920, the White Rock Senior Center (WRSC) at 672-2034 and “Day Out” (adult day care, 8 a.m.-4 p.m.) at 661-0081. Reservations: by 10 a.m. for lunches.

    Betty Ehart

    8:45 a.m.        Cardio
    11:30 a.m.        Lunch: Chicken Enchilada
    6 p.m.        Argentine Tango dancing
    7 p.m.        Ballroom dancing
    8:45 a.m.         Variety Training
    11:30 a.m.        Lunch: Eggplant & Pasta
    1 p.m.        Party Bridge (Classroom)
    7 p.m.        Bridge
    7:30 p.m.        Table Tennis
    8:30 a.m.        LAVA Quilters
    8:45 a.m.         Cardio Plus Exercise    
    10:30 a.m.        Music with Ruth
    10:30 a.m.        AARP Meeting    
    11:30 a.m.        Lunch: Grilled Pork Chop

  • While some refer to horses as livestock, others consider horses to be a companion animal, especially if they are kept for recreational purposes. Miniature horses—which measure 34 to 38 inches in height—are also recognized by many as companion animals. However, if you want to own a miniature horse as a pet, don’t assume a miniature size means less upkeep and expense than a full-sized horse.
    Dr. Leslie Easterwood, clinical assistant professor at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, offered some insight on caring for miniature horses.
    “General care and maintenance are exactly the same for miniature horses as for full-sized horses, the only difference is size,” she said. “Vaccinations, dental care, hoof care, feeding, and housing are consistent for all equines. Miniature horses are also susceptible to the same diseases and ailments as full-sized horses. They are anatomically exactly the same as full sized horses, so they have the same risk factors for lameness, gastrointestinal issues, respiratory issues, and other health complications.”