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Today's Features

  • Powerball didn’t work out for you this week. You picked the wrong color combo for your unicorn look. They closed the highway before you got through the construction zone.

    There’s bad luck all over.

    Here’s a tip.

    The puppy Morello over at the Los Alamos County Animal Shelter could be the best thing that’s happened to you in quite awhile.

    His charm is his youth, and potential.

    A mixed breed with terrier traits, he’s a small puppy likely to reach medium proportions.

    He’s got a cute ear fold happening and appears genuinely interested in what comes next.

    He’s got some of his shots, not all, and he’ll need boosters.

    Consider making Morello part of your universe. Bad luck doesn’t last long when you’ve got a friend.

    Please contact the Los Alamos County Animal Shelter at 662-8179 or email at Police-psa@lacnm.us.
     

  • If Halloween is spooky for you, just think of it from a dog’s perspective: Costumed creatures, sugary treats and things that go “boo” in the night — oh my. These simple precautions from the Santa Fe Animal Shelter, however, can make the festive event fun.
    • Watch out for candy. Chocolate in all forms can be very dangerous to dogs and cats. And some candies contain the artificial sweetener xylitol, which can also cause problems. Pumpkins and corn might not be life-threatening but can upset stomachs.
    • Lighted pumpkins are fun but be careful that Fido doesn’t knock over all your work and start a fire. And curious kittens run the risk of getting burned by candles.
    • Dress-up can be fun for critters, but not all of them love it as much as you do. Watch the stress level, and only put on costumes that don’t restrict movement or hearing or impede the ability to breathe, bark or meow. Consider a colorful bandanna if all else fails.
    • Keep dogs and cats in a separate room away from the front door during peak trick-or-treating hours. Too many strangers can be stressful.
    • If you can’t resist bringing your critter along for trick-or-treating, make sure he or she can be seen from the road.

  • Los Alamos Symphony Orchestra fans are in for a treat this year when the orchestra welcomes premier cello soloist Wendy Warner to the stage Nov. 4, at Crossroads Bible Church. 

    Together, with longtime friend and LASO Conductor David Chavez, they will present the Saint-Sens Concerto No. 1.

    Warner came to fame when she made her debut with the Chicago Symphony at 14. In 1990, she won the top prize at the Fourth Annual Rostropovich Competition four years later.

    Chavez first met Warner when he was playing with the then New Mexico Symphony Orchestra. At the time, she was a guest soloist, performing a cello concerto by Dvorak.

    “Wendy and I have sustained a wonderful friendship over the years, and I am lucky to have kept my relationship with her,” Chavez said.

    This season, Warner has performed with orchestras and musical groups in China and Peru. In the U.S. she has performed with symphonies in Wichita Kansas and other places in the U.S.

    When she’s not traveling, she teaches music at the Schwob School of Music in Columbus, Geogia.

  • TODAY
    Trick–or–Treat on MainStreet will haunt downtown Los Alamos again on from 4-6 p.m. During the event, Main Street and Central Avenue, from 15th to 20th Streets, are closed to auto traffic and become a safe pedestrian area where local businesses and organizations distribute candy to costumed families. At 4 p.m., LAHS Olions will present live statues; 4:30 p.m. performance by High Flyers; 5 p.m. performance by Dance Arts Los Alamos; 5:30 p.m. Pet Costume Parade.

    Knights of Columbus Haunted House from 6-10 p.m. at 104 DP Road. Cost is $6 for adults, $4 for kids, under age 4 are free.

    Pajarito Prewpub and Grill Costume Party with live music by the Bus Tapes from 8 p.m.-midnight. Ages 21 and older.

    Los Alamos Teen Center Halloween Party.

    Sugar Skull Painting Event from 6:30-9 p.m. at UnQuarked Wine Room.

    High Tech Halloween from 4-6 p.m. at the Bradbury Science Museum.

    Gentle Walks
 at 9 a.m. at the Nature Center. A gentle walk for which the emphasis is on discovery, not mileage gained. Free.
    SATURDAY
    Acid Canyon Clean-up Day
from 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Join the County’s Open Space Specialist and other volunteers to clean up the leftover fencing below the nature center in Acid Canyon. Free. More information at peecnature.org.

  • TODAY
    Los Alamos High School fifth-annual Career Fair from noon-3 p.m. at the Aux Gym. A variety of Los Alamos community members will present a variety of careers at this year’s event and share their experiences with students. There will also be representatives from UNM-LA, Northern New Mexico College and Santa Fe Community College, Workforce Solutions and the military. The event will include drawings and meetings with career reps. For more information, contact Connie Goettee at c.goettee@laschools.net.

  • The Democratic Party of Los Alamos will host Roy Zimmerman at the Unitarian Church, 1738 N. Sage Street, tonight.
    Zimmerman, who is currently on his “ReZist” tour, a musical satirist, will perform his original music and commentary at the church.
    The show will start at 7:30 p.m.
    Tickets are $20 and can be purchased by visiting losalamosdemocrats.org. 

  • The Los Alamos Retirement Community will host a Fall Prevention Presentation from 2-3 p.m. Nov. 9 at Aspen Ridge Assisted Living, 1010 Sombrillo Court, in Los Alamos.
    The informative presentation about preventing injury will include speakers Donna McHenry, an EMS, Pauline Schneider, the senior center director, and Cynthia Goldblatt, the community liaison of the Los Alamos Retirement Community.
    The community is invited the event. Refreshments will be served and RSVP is required. Contact Goldblatt at 695-8981 for information. 

  • In recognition of World Polio Day Tuesday, members of the Rotary Club of Los Alamos visited local elementary schools Oct. 19 to raise money for polio eradication.
    In 1985, Rotary International began raising funds in an effort to eliminate polio worldwide. Polio has not been a problem in the United States for many years, but this is not the case in many developing countries.
    By partnering with the World Health Organization and other government and private groups, Rotary International has achieved a 99 percent reduction of polio worldwide. Rotary Club of Los Alamos has participated in this effort from the beginning. Presently, through the Purple Pinkie Project, the club wishes to make students in the Los Alamos Public School District part of the effort to eradicate Polio.
    Since $1 is the estimated cost to immunize one child from polio, local students were encouraged to bring $1 or more to help with this cause. Each time a student put $1 in the Purple Pinkie Bucket, Rotarians painted his or her pinkie with Gentian Violet as a symbol of one child immunized from polio.

  • Communication is key in every relationship or level of leadership, if you have any chance for things to go smoothly.
    This week is Red Ribbon Week, which is a weeklong drug prevention messaging week. The ideas are generally simple like wearing red, hugs not drugs or too smart to start.
    You might not think that the messaging matters, but the truth is if we say nothing, that strategy is sure to work against you.
    We need to speak with our children and speak often about the choices they make and how those choices can make a difference in their lives.
    I don’t mean talking to them in a preachy, “When I was your age,” kind of way, I mean using the instances we see in our daily lives that bring the simple messaging into a real-world perspective.
    You can’t always choose their friends, their mates or their jobs, even though many will try. Always try to help them on the path when they ask questions or come to you for advice.
    You may not always have the answers, but one of the luxuries of being surrounded by all this tech is that so many resources are at your fingertips.
    The opioid crisis which seems to be all over the news every day is one topic to have a conversation about, you can avoid it, but it will not avoid our children.