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Today's Features

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  • Christmas trees? Now that is a sweet holiday treat. Add in chocolate and the event becomes an extravaganza.

    Just such an event is being held starting Nov. 14 at the Betty Ehart Senior Center. The Chocolate Festival will be held at 7 p.m. In addition to sweet edible treats, the trees featured in the Festival of Trees, will be also unveiled. The trees will be displayed for a week, wrapping up with a special event from 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Nov. 21 at the senior center.

  • Bilingual Montessori School relocated to its new building at 115 Longview Drive Oct. 1 and everyone  from the students to the teachers are noticing and appreciating the differences.

    The school, owner Odalys Fernandez said, needed a bigger space than its former 111 Longview Drive building. to accommodate its larger student population. The number of students grew from 37 to 50.

    These 50 students have plenty of space in the new building, which features five classrooms, a portal for 1-year-olds, a playground, kitchen and teacher’s lounge.

  • Classical music is more than just pretty sounds. For instance, between 1795-1880, a combination of an emotional and political atmosphere was commonly featured in the music. Hear this music during the Los Alamos Symphony Orchestra’s fall concert to be presented at 7 p.m. Nov. 13 in the Immaculate Heart of Mary Church. Michael Gyurik will conduct the concert.

  • When reading, images are conjured in a reader’s mind. They wonder, what does a character look like? What the appearance of a setting? With a new book by Anne Hillerman and Don Strel, these questions can be answered.

    Their book, “Tony Hillerman’s Landscape: On the Road with Leaphorn and Chee,” takes a visual tour of the settings featured in the mystery writer’s books.

  • On Friday, Los Alamos resident Jim Knudson will step into the spotlight as the soloist with the Los Alamos Symphony Orchestra, playing the “Saint-Saens Cello Concerto.” Knudson is not inexperienced with the limelight. Being a soloist is only one of many hats this man wears.

  • Feelings account for a lot. In fact, according to the Search Institute, youth benefit from possessing Asset #33, Interpersonal Competence. The institute states, “Youth are more likely to grow up healthy when they have empathy, sensitivity and friendship making skills.”

    This week, I have had the honor and pleasure of assisting the Russian delegation from our Sister City in Sarov, Russia, and attending the annual Search Institute Conference.

  • Thirty students made a commitment to leadership and to serve community.

    To cement this commitment, the Los Alamos Youth Leadership students are working on a variety of fundraising and service activities.  

    The teams are driven by the youth who coordinate everything from meetings and projects to team names and outcomes.

    Each team has its own unique name. For instance, there is the SPK team, or the Sour Patch Kids.

    This name was selected because sometimes the team members are sweet and sometimes they’re sour.

  • At first glance, it may seem like they are just the ones who drive the county transit buses, send out the utility bills or patrol the streets. On Saturday, however, the Los Alamos County employees are going to show a side of themselves not often seen in public.

    The Los Alamos County Employee Arts and Crafts Fair will be held from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. at Fuller Lodge. During this fair, 28 vendors, which will include county employees, their spouses and friends, will unleash their artistic side.