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Today's Features

  • I wish you a new start filled with positivity tomorrow, as we head back to school. It begins a new chapter in many ways and hopefully we will encourage our children to take charge in writing their story.

    I look ahead to a new year of building Assets, helping community members to see the importance of building them each and every day, with the smallest of efforts. Since there are 40, the work is easy.

    The relationships we have throughout our lives, even into adulthood is what encourages us to want to learn, to keep on learning and to find the spark that lights the passion within each of us.

    It doesn’t matter what brings you passion, this year try and put it into play. It may come in a form you never considered or require that your life changes completely in order to fuel the desire to achieve it.

    I am elated that once again the Los Alamos County Council will proclaim the month of September “Assets Month,” with the goal of building Assets throughout the year.

  • TODAY
    Change Is Our Choice: Creating Climate Solutions at 6 p.m. at the Nature Center.
Change Is Our Choice provides an opportunity to discuss the implications of climate change on our past, present, and future. Learn how to mitigate the effects and ensure a greener, more sustainable future. Participation is FREE, but purchase of the coursebook is REQUIRED.

  • Beginning on Monday, Comcast will remove and replace aerial cable lines located along Trinity Drive from 37th Street to Canyon View as part of a network improvement project for Los Alamos area customers.  

    Work will take place from 10 p.m.-5 a.m. Monday and Tuesday.

    There will be single lane closures and a flagging operation guiding traffic through the work zone.
    All residents and businesses along the work corridor will receive door tags informing them of the project dates and times.

    For questions about this project, contact CableCom project supervisor Tim Stroman at 505-417-0219.

  • Last weekend, Kim Granzow broke several weightlifting records in her age and weight class, qualifying for the 2018 Nationals Masters Championships to be held in Buffalo, New York. She represented CrossFit Los Alamos at the summer meet held at The Miller Gym in Santa Fe.

    Granzow tied one state record for the 63 kg weight class of the 60-64 year old women’s age group and broke two other records. She tied her old record of 30 kg in the snatch and broke the previous state record from 2011 in the clean and jerk by lifting 39 kg. She also earned the state record for her total of 69 kg.

    While she had done some light weight training in college, it wasn’t until Granzow decided to try CrossFit in Los Alamos in 2012 that she learned the sport of weightlifting. Also referred to as “Olympic lifting” because it is the only barbell sport in the Olympic Games, weightlifting has two events: the snatch and the clean and jerk. In the snatch, the lifter takes the barbell from the ground to overhead in one movement; in the clean and jerk, the barbell goes from the ground to the shoulders and then from the shoulders to overhead.

  • NEW YORK (AP) — You won’t find any pictures of dogs playing poker at DoGUMENTA.
    A three-day art exhibition curated expressly for dogs is attracting hundreds of canines to a marina in lower Manhattan, where hounds and terriers are feasting their eyes, and in some cases their mouths, on nearly a dozen masterpieces created expressly for them.

    The idea is the brainchild of former Washington Post art critic Jessica Dawson, who says she was inspired by her rescue dog Rocky, a tiny morkie (Yorkie-Maltese mix), who regularly joins her at exhibits of the human variety.

    “When Rocky accompanied me on my gallery visits I noticed that he was having a much better time than I was,” explains Dawson, who moved to New York four years ago. “He was not reading the New York Times reviews, he was not reading the artists’ resumes, and so I said he has something to teach me about looking, and all dogs have something to teach us about looking at contemporary art and being with it.”

    Organizers of the exhibit, which takes its name from Documenta, which takes place every five years in Kassel, Germany, and put on by Arts at Brookfield, staggered the arrival times of the dogs to keep things orderly.

  • Whether you are taking your animal in for their regular check-up or making an emergency visit, being evaluated by a veterinarian is a critical part in your pet’s health. But what if an animal is too sick or injured to be transported to the clinic? Some animals, such as livestock, may even require a trailer for transport. Luckily for pet and livestock owners, mobile veterinarians are there to help.

    Leslie Easterwood, clinical assistant professor at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, explained the important role mobile veterinarians play in animal health.

    “The most common reason for an owner to use a mobile veterinarian is so that they do not have to transport their animal to a hospital,” Easterwood said. “There could be a variety of reasons why having the veterinarian come to the farm or home is better, such as situations where there are several animals to be treated or the owner does not have access to a livestock trailer.”

  • Meet Ball, the Los Alamos Animal Shelter’s Pet of the Week. Ball is a handsome Shar-Pei mix with soft, short- to mid-length, curled fur who is looking for a forever home. Ball has been at the shelter since July 24.

    Ball is about 1 year old and knows some basic commands, like “sit” and “lay down.” Ball is smart, playful and has the biggest personality. Although he might be a little shy in new situations, Ball will quickly warm up to a buddy willing to play with him. Ball also loves to snuggle and will hold hands if someone stops petting him.

    Ball can be protective of his home, but does not climb, jump or dig under a fence.

    He is up-to-date on all shots and vaccinations, so Ball is available for adoption.
    For more information on this sweet boy, contact the Los Alamos County Animal Shelter at 662-8179, or email police-psa@lacnm.us.

    Photo by Paulina Gwaltney Photography, 910-333-6362. Gwaltney’s studio is located at 3500 Trinity Drive.

  • TRENTON, N.J. — A 9-year-old New Jersey boy who described himself as a “Guardian of the Galaxy” is hoping to add the real-life NASA title “Planetary Protection Officer” to his resume.

    NASA received an application for the position from fourth-grader Jack Davis, who asked to apply for the job. In a letter the agency posted online , Jack acknowledged his youth, but said that will make it easier for him to learn how to think like an alien. He said he has seen all the space and alien movies he can see, and he is great at video games.

    “My sister says I am an alien also,” Jack wrote in the hand-written letter dated Aug. 3.

    Jack received a letter from NASA Planetary Science Director James Green encouraging him to study hard so he can one day join them at the agency.

    “We are always looking for bright future scientists and engineers to help us,” Green wrote his response, which was also posted online. Green told Jack the job is about protecting other planets and moons “from our germs” as the agency explores the Solar System.

    Jack also received a phone call from NASA Planetary Research Director Jonathan Rall thanking him for his interest.

  • CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — Total solar eclipses occur every year or two or three, often in the middle of nowhere like the South Pacific or Antarctic. What makes the Aug. 21 eclipse so special is that it will cut diagonally across the entire United States.

    The path of totality — where day briefly becomes night — will pass over Oregon, continuing through the heartland all the way to Charleston, South Carolina. Those on the outskirts — well into Canada, Central America and even the top of South America — will be treated to a partial eclipse.

    The last time a total solar eclipse swept the whole width of the U.S. was in 1918.

    No tickets are required for this Monday show, just special eclipse glasses so you don’t ruin your eyes.
    Some eclipse tidbits:

    What’s a total solar eclipse?

  • Come to the Los Alamos Mountaineers meeting on Aug. 22 at the Nature Center to hear from adventurer Forest Altherr about his rock climbing experiences in Yosemite.

    The presentation will begin at 7:15 p.m. The Los Alamos Mountaineers meeting will start at 7 p.m. and cover information about upcoming outings.


    Forest Altherr has explored the cracks, crevasses and faces of Yosemite’s largest granite slabs since 2008. Inspired by the valley’s iconic monoliths, Altherr initially dedicated himself to the craft of honing the intellectual, psychological, and physical skills necessary to climb many of the classic routes on El Capitan. While primarily a rock climber with a taste for big routes,

    Altherr enjoys all aspects of climbing. Not only is the sport thrilling, but it also provides a sense of connection among dedicated climbers worldwide.

    Altherr will explore the contrast between dichotomous styles of big wall climbing: vertical camping and speed climbing.
    The Los Alamos Mountaineers meetings are always free to the public, and no registration is required.