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Today's Features

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    New drugs are under constant development but most fail in clinical trials. Why do so many drugs pass animal testing, but fail in Phase 1 clinical trials in humans? Are animal models of human diseases ultimately really a good model for humans?

    Enter ATHENA. ATHENA, which stands for Advanced Tissue-engineered Human External Network Analyzer, is designed to simulate organ systems – such as liver, heart, lung, and kidney – and can be used as a first-line test for potential toxicity analysis since the system can mimic the response of actual human organs. Such research could lead to faster approval and fewer potential side effects for new medications coming onto the market.

    Join Los Alamos National Laboratory’s Jennifer Harris, with the lab’s Biosecurity and Public Health group, as she takes you through the research being carried out at the laboratory in this important field. Science On Tap is today 1 beginning at 5:30 p.m. at UnQuarked, 145 Central Park Square.

    Bring your Bradbury Science Museum Association membership card (or join on the spot – at very reasonable rates) and get $1 off your food and/or drink at Science On Tap.

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    The Los Alamos County Library System will present the celebrated acoustic duo Hungrytown at 6:30 p.m. March 6 at the Fuller Lodge Art Center, 2132 Central Ave. 

     

    Last July, they returned from a successful six-and-a-half-month tour of the US, UK and New Zealand, covering over 16,000 miles in the U.S. 

    Hungrytown is currently on a four-month tour of the American south and southwest.

    Vermonters Rebecca Hall and Ken Anderson, who make up Hungrytown, have been touring professionally for nearly 15 years. 

    Hungrytown’s songs and music have appeared in numerous television programs, including IFC’s “Portlandia,” Comedy Central’s “The Daily Show” and Neftlix’s new comedy, Lady Dynamite,” as well as various documentaries and major sporting events ranging from NASCAR to Hockey Night in Canada.

    Their third and latest album, “Further West,” made the top 10 on the American Folk DJ charts for two months, and at least 14 “Best of the year” lists. 

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    The Los Alamos Community Winds will host “Joyride! A Journey in Music” Saturday at Crossroads Bible Church.

    LACW, an amateur wind ensemble formed by members of the greater Los Alamos community, will perform several popular selections such as Rimsky-Korsakov’s “Scheherazade, op. 35 - IV. The Thief of Baghdad,” Franz von Suppé’s “Light Cavalry Overture,” and Percy Aldridge Grainger’s “Irish Tune from County Derry” and Shepherd’s “Hey.” 

    The Winds will also showcase several obscure pieces such as “On Parade,” by John Philip Sousa, Michael Markowski’s “Joyride,” Robert W. Smith’s “Songs of Sailor and Sea,” and Leonard Bernstein’s “Slava!” 

    In agreement with the title of the concert, the program provides a journey in music through the inclusion of operettas, symphonic suites, folk tunes and marches. 

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    TODAY

    Today- March 14 —
    Galactic Adventurers
    from 1-3 p.m. at the Nature Center. Explore stars, planets, robots, satellites, and solar systems with PEEC! This four-session class is for upper elementary age (third- sixth-grade) and meets every Wednesday. Cost is $75 for non-members, $60 for PEEC members. 

     

    Science on Tap at 5:30 p.m. at UnQuarked Wine Room, 145 Central Park Square. Join the Los Alamos National Laboratory’s Jennifer Harris, with the lab’s Biosecurity and Public Health group, as she takes you through the research being carried out at the laboratory in this very important field. 

    THURSDAY

    Coffee and Connections at 10 a.m. at Ruby K’s Bagel Café. Come join the group for an hour of caffeine and networking. Coffee Connection is a fun, monthly morning networking event for chamber members only. It’s not just coffee; it’s about fostering relationships and building up a strong professional network.

    FRIDAY

  • The United Church of Los Alamos is seeking donations for their Mexico Mission community auction in March. Items can be brought to 2525 Canyon Road and questions answered at 662-2971. Large items may be able to request a pick up.
    Adults from the United Church and the Unitarian Church will build homes for the poor during spring break.

  • Poet David Mutschlecner will read from his latest book of poetry “Icon” as the latest offering in Mesa Public Library’s Authors Speak series.

    The reading starts at 7 p.m. Thursday in the Upstairs Rotunda of Mesa Public Library, 2400 Central Ave.
    Mutschlecner’s published work includes the poetry books “Esse,” “Sign” and “Enigma and Light” from Ahsahta Press, and “Veils” from Stride Press.

    With “Icon” Mutschlecner continues his exploration of theopoetics, which is “where poetry shines a light into theology, cleansing it of dogmatism while nurturing inclusivity.”

    He views poetry as a place where “intensifications of reality occur.” Poems from “Icon” will also appear in “New American Writing.”

    Ahsahta Press prides itself on championing and promoting “surprising, relevant and accessible experimental poetry that more commercially minded small presses avoid.”

    Although Ahsahta is the press affiliated with the University of Idaho, there are many connections to Los Alamos and northern New Mexico.

  • With spring right around the corner, many of us are bracing ourselves for pesky allergies. Just like people, pets can suffer from allergies, too. While humans tear, cough, and sneeze their way through allergy season, pets usually deal with allergies differently.

    Dr. Adam Patterson, a clinical associate professor and chief of dermatology at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, said every animal has a different reaction to allergies, just as people respond to allergies differently. However, most animals display itch as a hallmark sign of allergic skin disease.

    “An itch may be manifested as licking, chewing, biting, rubbing, scratching, head shaking, and/or scooting,” Patterson said. “Common itchy body areas include the face, ears, paws, armpits, groin, rump, and anal region. Horses may present with an itchy skin disease and/or hives.”

    Allergens that most commonly irritate pets include fleas, pollen, molds, mites, insects, danders, and food.

  • What is it like to photograph wildland fires and firefighters? Kristen Honig will discuss her observations, show her photographs, and give a behind the scenes look at what it is like to be a wildfire photographer at 7 p.m. Tuesday at the Nature Center.

    Honig’s wildfire photos have been recognized by National Geographic and featured in numerous magazines and publications, including Popular Science, Outside Magazine, High Country News, Wildland Firefighter Magazine, Fire Management Today, and in the novel “On the Burning Edge.”

    This special presentation at the Los Alamos Nature Center is free and made possible thanks to the Los Alamos Photo Club and the Pajarito Environmental Education Center.

    Los Alamos and the surrounding areas have been exposed to more than a half-dozen significant wildfires since 1977, including the 2000 Cerro Grande Fire that consumed more than 47,000 acres and damaged or destroyed more than 350 structures. The Cerro Grande Fire had a lasting impact on the community and inspired local photographer Honig to document not only the beauty and destructiveness of wildfires but also the sacrifices and camaraderie of the firefighters who battle them.

  • This week’s stunning Pet of the Week is Azrah, a 7-year-old love bug who is aging like fine wine.

    Azrah was surrendered to the Valencia County Animal Shelter after her owner was having some issues with their landlord.

    She adores kittens and loves to snuggle with them. She is also good with kids and is a housebroken lap cat that enjoys a good snooze in the sun.

    Azrah loves to snack on canned food and likes to be brushed. She has been micro chipped and, because she is considered a senior cat (7 or older), her adoption fee is only $35.

    For more information about this gorgeous girl please contact the Los Alamos County Animal Shelter at 662-8179 or Police-PSA@lacnm.us.

  • The Los Alamos Choral Society will host a brief "meet and greet" party at 6 p.m. Tuesday in the social area of the United Church of Los Alamos to welcome the choir's new director, Steve Paxton.

    Paxton holds a bachelor's degree in music, with an emphasis in composition from the University of North Texas, a master's degree in music, composition and voice, from North Texas, and a doctorate in fine arts from Texas Tech University.

    He was on the faculty of the School of Music at Texas Tech from 1981 to 2003, and he was department chairman of the Contemporary Music Program at Santa Fe University of Art and Design for 12 years.

    Spring 2018 registration for LACS will be held simultaneously with the party on Feb. 20. Those interested in singing with the choir may join by paying a $25 music fee and picking up a set of music. No audition is required. Membership is open to all singers, but the choir is especially interested in adding more tenors and basses.

    Rehearsals for the spring concert will, in general, be held on Tuesday evenings, 7-9 p.m., at the United Church.

    The spring concert will be presented at least twice. Times and locations are not yet scheduled. At least one of the performances will be on Memorial Day, May 28, in Los Alamos. Watch the local media for concert announcements in early May.