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Today's Features

  • Going through cancer treatment changes how a person looks and feels. This, in turn, can modify ones’ actions, relationships and life. If you are going through cancer treatment and want to be more comfortable in society again, realize you are not alone.

    A 2006 on-line survey conducted by the Cincinnati-based research firm R.L. Repass & Partners Inc. showed that a 69 percent majority of 400 female cancer patients said their appearance changed either somewhat or a lot during chemotherapy or radiation.

  • To anyone who thinks a library is just books, its time to look between the shelves because the Los Alamos County Library System is about to prove just how cool it really is. The rock ’n’ roll band, The High Strung is coming to perform, along with the local band, The Small Town Lab Rats.

    The free concert will be held at 7 p.m. Wednesday at Fuller Lodge and is sponsored by the county libraries and funded in part by the Friends of the Library.

  • “The Marriage of Figaro” has been one of the world’s most popular operas almost since its first production in Vienna 222 years ago. Through Mozart’s immortal music, never more sublimely simple, and the revolutionary, politically-incorrect play of Beaumarchais, the complex depths of the human heart are plumbed under the deceptively pleasing guise of romantic farce. Nobody dies, true love triumphs and everyone is paired off appropriately.

  • Possessing intellect is not the only vital component to being successful in science; having fun is also essential.

    A team of Los Alamos Middle School eighth-graders put this theory to the test during the regional and national Science Bowl competitions, and their conclusion revealed enjoyment and brains are equally important.

  • While members of Trinity on the Hill Episcopal Church and Bethlehem Lutheran Evangelical Church prepare to host the annual Vacation Bible School and Day Camp, which will be held July 7-11, the House of Hope Women are making preparations for the annual Vacation Bible School evening family dinner.

  • What would you do? You’re a middle-aged woman living in a big, suburban home. You and your husband have four daughters, one in high school, one in college and two in-between. Then one evening, your husband doesn’t come home – the same day, you find out, his secretary runs off to Sweden with her mysterious lover.

    In Mike Binder’s “The Upside of Anger,” this is Terry Wolfmeyer’s (Joan Allen) situation. She decides to get mad.

    And she finds a few things  to keep her furious.

  • UNM-Los Alamos will bring college to kids in first through sixth grade this summer.

    “We love having the kids on campus,” said Community Education Coordinator Eileen Gallegos. “The enthusiasm they have for learning is always inspiring.”

  • TESUQUE, N.M. – The Santa Fe Opera’s new production of “Falstaff” opened the season Friday night with all the camp and circumstance befitting Giusseppe Verdi’s comic masterpiece, based on Shakespeare’s shameless, big-bellied rascal.

    The Falstaff of the two-part “Henry IV,” called back for his own show in the “Merry Wives of Windsor, “has the patent on the role of the most deplorably loveable, gluttonous reprobate of all time.

  • Uli’s Cottontails is hosting a competition that requires skill, creativity, thought and lots of Legos. The annual Lego design competition allows young people to prove their strengths as builders with the plastic primary-colored blocks.

  • Los Alamos Public Schools’ physical condition could get some healing through a potential 20-year facility plan, but not all classrooms will be given attention.

    “It’s just a matter of priority,” explained Los Alamos Public School Foundation board member Morrie Pongratz. For instance, at Los Alamos High School, the plan addresses B, C and D wings, but not E-wing, the location for science classrooms.