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Today's Features

  • Bridge involves a lot of thought and teamwork. Players need to communicate with teammates to determine, based on their cards, whether they should bid to take certain tricks or sit back and defend.

    It is also a card game that Los Alamos resident Jerry Flemming has loved since attending college in the mid-‘60s. “I find bridge to be an absolutely fascinating, challenging card game,” he said.

  • For some people, the New Year may be started off with fireworks, or clouds of confetti or glasses clinking together, but why not do things a little differently for 2009? Kick off the New Year with drama.

    Los Alamos Little Theatre is hosting a special New Year’s Eve performance of its upcoming production of “Ten Nights in a Barroom.”

    The doors of the Little Theatre will open at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday.

  • Seeing family during the holidays turned into an opportunity to host a concert for pianist Roy Dunlap.

    Dunlap, who resides in New York, will be visiting his sister Piper Wohlbier and her husband, John, in Los Alamos this week; additionally, he will be performing a concert, “An Evening of Jazz,” at 7 p.m. Sunday at Fuller Lodge.

    The program, Dunlap explained, will mostly be holiday tunes, including music from the “Nutcracker Suite” along with some traditional holiday music.

  • It’s surprising just how much a person is able to achieve, if she gives herself a chance. While participating in a yoga class, the instructor decided to present a different yoga position to the session, one unlike all the cobras, downward dogs, planks and child poses that had be executed for most of the time. For this move, the participants had to kneel, twist to one side, loop one arm across their back, circle the other arm underneath their leg, touch both hands, then slowly stand up and extend the leg slung between their arms.

  • The Art Center at Fuller Lodge (ACFL) wants you, Los Alamos resident, to know that art is alive and well in town, and we’d like to see more of you indulging in the visual feast.

    Soon all area residents will receive a call to join in the time honored tradition of art patronage. Although the Art Center in its present form has been serving the community of Los Alamos for more than 30 years, many in Los Alamos are not aware of the existence of this cultural entity.

  • Bandelier National Monument Superintendent Brad Traver announced the temporary display of school projects completed by Chamisa Elementary fourth-graders following a fall field trip to Bandelier National Monument.

    “Dana Kline, fourth-grade social studies teacher, used Bandelier-created curriculum to prepare the children for their trip to the Monument,” Traver said. “They made timelines and learned about the Ancestral Pueblo people who first lived in Frijoles Canyon.”

  • This week we look at Asset #33, Interpersonal Competence. According to the Search-Institute, “Youth are more likely to grow up healthy when they have empathy, sensitivity and friendship-making skills.”

    I attended a presentation one time where a local scientist was watching fellow employees as they passed on the side walk to see if people made eye contact or spoke as they came upon each other. The truth was they didn’t even look up from their shoes.

  • At the upcoming Christmas Concert, the Los Alamos Big Band will be reunited with some old friends.

    The Mountaineers quartet will once again take the stage with the big band at 7:30 p.m. Dec. 27 at the Immaculate Heart of Mary Church’s parish hall.

    In addition to performing songs from the big band era of the 1940s’, the band, along with the quartet, will present “Chattanooga Choo-Choo,” “Birdland” and “Kalamazoo.”

    Holiday tunes will be featured, too.

  • The holiday season possesses a lot of unique qualities – characteristics that do not often appear during the rest of the year. Snow and the spirit of giving are a few features that are highly visible everywhere this time of year, but Los Alamos has a few holiday characteristics of its very own.

  • We all know that December can be a stressful, mad rush to buy gifts, mail out holiday greetings and overload credit cards. But there is another side to this season and it's called Yule – the old holy day of northern European Pagans.

    Yule, the festival of the Winter Solstice, is celebrated between Dec. 20 and 23 based on the solar calendar. This year, it is on Sunday. In the Wiccan/Pagan Wheel of the year, Yule is a solar holiday, celebrating fire, whether the fire is the sun, the hearth fire or the flame of a candle.