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Today's Features

  • The Rotary Club of Los Alamos recently honored Emma Catherine Carroll as the Student of the Month for September.  

    Emma is the daughter of David Carroll (’Topper Class of 1965) and Janice Carroll, an LAPS teacher.  Her sister Anna Carroll is a sophomore at LAHS.

  • Most parents have had at least one altercation with a car seat.  

    Whether trying to rescue a child from an aggressive seat belt or working up a sweat trying to get the seat belt to buckle, car seats can be frustrating.  And often in the end it is uncertain if the car seat was installed properly.

    Parents put their children in car seats to protect them.  

    However, there are many styles of car seats and just as many types of vehicles in which to install them, often making installing a car seat a daunting experience.

  • Being healthy has its challenges. It can be tough to remember to get your flu shot, schedule every doctor’s check-up and eat nutritious foods. Luckily, the Los Alamos Heart Council, the Los Alamos Medical Center and the Los Alamos County Library System are extending a helping hand. These agencies are bringing health care services to the public and conveniently located them under one roof.  

  • Piñon Elementary School students were recognized recently for their efforts in reading.

    The students’ work ethic will demonstrate that with self-discipline they can succeed academically and socially in future years.

    “Their work ethic is a model for all students,” Principal Megan Lee said. “Most students read many books and others practiced math skills, learned about science and even created a blog about the environment.”

  • The University of New Mexico, Department of Mathematics and Statistics, and the PNM Foundation have announced the UNM-PNM Statewide Mathematics Contest for the 2009-2010 school year. The goal of the contest is to promote mathematics education in New Mexico by rewarding students, teachers and their schools for mathematics excellence. Approximately 1,500 New Mexico students benefit from this program annually.

  • The Artist’s Gallery at the Art Center at Fuller Lodge looks ready to set sail, with large newsprint sheets suspended on weighted lines throughout the space. The current show, “Life Drawing Sketchbook” is unlike any other show ever mounted in Los Alamos, with a multitude of human forms in a variety of shapes, clothed and unclothed and in a variety of formats. An elongated wood sculpture sits surrounded by a flurry of images, framed and unframed: predominantly charcoal sketches with a handful of paintings and even a couple of photographs.

  • Mysteries can offer more than just a crime and a fast-talking detective; author Margaret Coel is attracted to the puzzles and the different worlds that this genre offers. She will discuss her attraction to mysteries during the Authors Speak presentation at 7 p.m. Thursday at Mesa Public Library.

    Her love of mysteries was furthered fueled by one of the masters of mystery novels, Tony Hillerman.

    “Tony Hillerman encouraged me,” Coel said. “He was a great influence. He actually gave me a quote – ‘She’s a master.’

  • October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month and to recognize this month, Self Help, Inc. is sowing some seeds of information about this disease with the goal of reaping hope.

    Dr. Erin Bouquin, a breast cancer survivor and a Los Alamos National Laboratory employee, will give a talk titled, “Perspectives on Breast Cancer” at 7 p.m. Thursday at Trinity on the Hill Episcopal Church.

    Self Help is hosting the talk, which is free.

  • This week we take a look at Asset #28, integrity and Asset #29, honesty.  According to the Search Institute, “Youth are more likely to grow up healthy when the young person acts on convictions and stands up for his or her beliefs,” and “Youth are more likely to grow up healthy when they are able to tell the truth, even when it is not easy.”

  • This year’s House of Hope building project in Juárez, Chihuahua, Mexico, almost didn’t happen.

    The diocese for Trinity on the Hill Episcopal Church, which operates House of Hope, prohibited plans to go down to the city and build a house. The upswing in violence in Juárez pushed the decision.

    Members of House of Hope, an all-women team of volunteers, didn’t take no for an answer. In an act of faith and perseverance, they meet with the diocese to state their case and eventually earned permission to go.