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Today's Features

  • Since moving to Los Alamos two summers ago, I’ve heard many stories from folks who lived through the days of the great fire of 2000. The Cerro Grande fire changed the landscape of Los Alamos and the mountains surrounding it for decades to come. Not only did the fire cause erosion by burning down vegetation, it also damaged the soil.

  • An instructor with rich experience in England and the United States in acting, directing and teaching Shakespearean theatre will lead a workshop this weekend at the Los Alamos Little Theatre (LALT).

    The workshop, to be held from 1-5 p.m. Saturday, is open to all participants, but those who plan to audition for Macbeth (LALT November production) are especially encouraged to attend.

  • John and Jean Lyman of Los Alamos figured they have a good life.

  • Is it better to write about what you know or to remain uninhibited by personal experience? Why write a play instead of a different form?

    Robert Benjamin will discuss these and other questions as the first playwright to present in Mesa Public Library’s Author Speak Series. The free event will take place at 7 p.m. Thursday in the upstairs rotunda.

    “If the audience wants to talk about process,” Benjamin said, “I can go there. Why don’t I write a novel? I can go there. I need some direction from the audience.”

  • If you’ve always wondered what exactly is meant by an art quilt, the “Seams Unusual” show, opening Friday at the Art Center at Fuller Lodge, should go a long way to clearing up the mystery.

    Seventeen New Mexico artists from all over the state have chosen this emerging medium to portray their artistic vision.

  • Patrick Sweany will be playing at 7 p.m. Friday in the Los Alamos National Bank parking lot as part of the Gordons’ Productions and Los Alamos County’s Summer Concert Series.

    I caught Sweany on the phone just as he was cruising down I-80 in the middle of Nebraska. Since his gig in Omaha, he’d been pulled over a couple of times by the cops. He figured they saw a long haired guy driving a beat up van and wanted to check things out. The cops didn’t find any drugs. No sex either. Just three guys listening to rock and roll.

  • VaLynn Purvis always had a knack for fun. From an early age she had an interest in games and activities with children and families.

    This interest in fun led her to establish her own business, Party to Go! in Los Alamos. The business was formed two years ago. In the past, she has participated in Fourth of July Carnival at the Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Church and offered balloon animals and games at activities at Chamisa and Pion elementary schools. Party To Go! offers its services at family and high school reunions, and kids’ birthday parties.

  • A woman with long silver hair – silver like unicorns, not bracelets – jumped to feet, shouting and clapping her hands above her head. She might have been crazy, I really don’t know. She was enthusiastic. The rest of us remained seated. But while she jumped and screamed compliments toward the podium, we clapped.

    A lot.

    Like you would after a great bit of stand-up comedy.

    Like you would after a particularly rousing line at a political rally.

    This was unlike any other poetry reading I’ve ever attended.

  • Two men sit together beside their horses, the West Texas sun smoldering in their cowboy hats. One asks the other to make sure his body, if he dies, finds its way home to Mexico, to his wife and children. “I’ll die first. I’m older than you,” his friend responds, but nevertheless, a promise is made.

    Much too soon, it is also kept.

  • What is green, orange, blue, and white and has wheels? Its the Atomic City Transit.

    For a week now, my friend and I have been riding the local bus system. As a summer project, we have asked many people about their opinion about the bus system. We decided that we should figure out the customers opinion about the bus by riding on the bus.