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Today's Features

  • If Los Alamos writer Kendal Fortson’s book, “ Brother to Jackals,” was a song, it would be a cannon; and if it was a shape, it would be a Mbius strip.

    It appears Fortson has not been timid in his literary debut, he charged right in. The book, he said, is about “sex, drugs and existential dilemmas.”

    Pour Yorick Publishing, a New Mexico publishing company, released “Brother to Jackals,” this month.

  • The famous war correspondent Ernie Pyle grew up in Indiana but moved with his wife to New Mexico in the 1940s, just before World War II started. They made their home in Albuquerque and even though Pyle traveled to provide first-hand accounts of the war, he would make trips to New Mexico.

    Eventually, Pyle’s New Mexico home would be transformed into the Ernie Pyle Library, which is how Richard Melzer became introduced to this war correspondent.

  • The Hope Pregnancy Center has had a busy year.

    “We’ve expanded our hours from 10 to 24 ee we’re also going to expand our office space in a new location (at the end of the month) to accommodate more clients,” executive director Sarah Taylor said. “We’ve hired a new client service administrator who oversees our in-house operation.”

    But there is much more on the pregnancy center’s to-do list and to accomplish more, it needs the community’s help.

  • Wall Street Journal reporter Daniel Pearl would have been 41 years old Friday. But rather than brooding over Pearl’s murder by terrorists, the world is celebrating his life through music and Los Alamos is joining in the festivities.

    The Los Alamos Community Winds, featuring Lesley Olsher, will host a concert at 7 p.m. Saturday at the Betty Ehart Senior Center.

    The Los Alamos chapter of Hadassah is promoting the event.

  • In 1846, 500 members of the Mormon Battalion marched approximately 2,000 miles to fight in the Mexican-American War. Today, that journey is being taken again and the marchers will be arriving in Santa Fe Saturday. In recognition, there will be at Mormon Battalion Event Saturday at the Stake Center and Los Alamos residents are invited.

  • This organization and its birds have made numerous appearances in Los Alamos.

    The Santa Fe Raptor Center staff and birds visit local schools, the farmer’s market and library. Now, it’s Los Alamos’ turn to visit the raptor center.

    An open house will be held from 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturday. The raptor center is located at #32 Jacinto Road in Santa Fe.

    “Basically people will be able to see the raptor housing,” Laura Swartz of the raptor center said.

  • What constitutes a work of art? Should all art fit within the limits of whatever definition Webster’s Dictionary assigns the word or should it venture outside the lines in favor of multiple meanings?

    Wandering through the newest exhibit at the Mesa Public Library, it seems clear that art defies a single definition. If something or someone is valued so highly and made immortal through paint, clay or any other medium, so in order that it can be shared with the rest of the world, then the work is worthy of the term art.

  • Out of the cauldron on Nectar Street will soon bubble a brand new take on one of William Shakespeare’s greatest tragedies.

    “I like Shakespeare better than anything else,” said Grady Hughes, who will play the title role in the Los Alamos Little Theatre’s upcoming production of “Macbeth,” set to open Halloween night.

    “This play,” Hughes added, “is dark poetry.”

  • A recent announcement of the 51 public school students to be named semifinalists in the 54th annual National Merit Scholarship Program reveals that Los Alamos Public Schools is at the top of the list with the most semifinalists in New Mexico.

    Ten Los Alamos students are semifinalists while La Cueva High School in Albuquerque has nine. New Mexico Education Secretary Veronica C. Garcia made the announcement.

  • For countless centuries the continent has experienced an extraordinary phenomenon. It happens throughout natural places.

    It happens in national parks. It happens in back yards. And it happens every year. A group of vertebrates with a direct lineage back to the dinosaurs play out this event.

    The vertebrates are birds and the phenomenon is called migration.