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Today's Features

  • The opportunity to learn a few new dance steps has arrived. The Roaring Jelly band will be hosting a contra dance Saturday at the Unitarian Church.

    An instructional session will begin at 6:30 p.m. followed by a dance at 7 p.m.

    Mark Petersen, who plays the accordion in the band, encourages the community to participate.

    “I think for the dancer, the appeal is you can learn the moves in the first half-hour,” he said.

  • At first, there were not enough people in the theater to even qualify as a handful. A couple had the front section to themselves, while the upper half was completely vacant. The scarce attendance did not seem like a good sign, and the reason appeared mysterious because other Los Alamos Little Theater’s (LALT) productions usually attract a full house.

  • Local writers spotlight a piece of history that is right in our downtown area. Craig Martin and Heather McClenahan address the artifacts from another era in their book, “Of Logs and Stone: The Buildings of the Los Alamos Ranch School and Bathtub Row.”

    The Los Alamos Historical Museum will host a book-signing event for the authors from 5:30-7 p.m. Monday.

    The book features the history of and stories about the oldest buildings in Los Alamos—Fuller Lodge and the smaller structures in the downtown National Landmark District.

  • If anyone needs a lesson about how to write anything from an essay to a script “short and sweet,” they should turn to Los Alamos Little Theater (LALT) for some guidance. After viewing the community theater’s latest production, “8x10 Again,” it is clear they are the masters at making the most out of a short amount of time.

    Eight plays are featured in the short play festival but the catch is all of them are only 10-minutes long.

  • Reserve a place at the Saint Dimitri Orthodox Church’s community dinner, which will be at 5 p.m. Sunday at United Church of Los Alamos, by calling 661-7466. Seating is restricted to the first 75 people and there is a suggested donation of $15 for adults and $5 for children age 10 and younger.

  • The local YMCA hopes that they can inspire Los Alamos residents to get on their feet this weekend to kick off America on the Move Week.

    America on the Move Week will be held Saturday through Sept. 27, with a goal to surpass the number of footsteps participants logged in 2007 by 20 million.

    “All you have to do to participate in this event is come into the YMCA or the Teen Center in Espaola and sign up to participate and you’ll receive a free pedometer,” said Melanie Chapman, YMCA fitness director.

  • To call this a Holocaust film is like calling Stanley Kubrick’s “The Shining” a love triangle. You have some explaining to do.

    Stefan Ruzowitsky’s “Flsher, Die,” or “The Counterfeiters” – 2008’s Oscar-winner for Best Foreign Language Film – takes place in a German concentration camp near the end of World War II. But like all memorable films, its setting serves more as a stage or catalyst than as the answer to the question, “What is this movie about?”

  • Why is a new Bond needed and what will it be used for?

    Over the years, the Los Alamos Public Schools have enjoyed a reputation for academic achievement and recognition by numerous groups and publications for excellence. While the district actively strives to provide an atmosphere where students can succeed, its buildings continue to age and deteriorate. Research documents that in well-built, attractive environments, student behavior is more positive and achievement is higher.

  • For this upcoming fundraiser, no formal attire or physical training is required; in fact, all that is needed to participate in the United Way of Northern New Mexico’s People Matter Bowling Event is some bowling shoes and a $30 donation.

    With these few requirements, participants can bowl from 6-9 p.m. Sept. 27 in the Big Rock Bowling Center in Espaola.

    In addition to helping out United Way in the current campaign to raise funds for its 18 agencies, people will also be awarded door prizes, giveaways and prizes for the highest and lowest scores.

  • Editor’s Note: This is a personal account of the Star Gazing on the Preserve event.

    At first the sky over the caldera was empty, except for a good-size wedge of the moon, which illuminated a pearl-gray light. But as the sky darken, it seemed as though a curtain was pulled back to the infinite amount of wonders the heavens contain.

    For those of us participating in the Star Gazing on the Preserve event, a handful of these features were seen in a closer view.