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Today's Features

  • Stephen Betts ran track and cross-country for one-and-a-half years in high school and then hung up his running shoes. Well, the running shoes are coming down because Betts, a Los Alamos resident, is taking on the mother lode of races, the Boston Marathon.

    Two things inspired Betts, a Los Alamos National Laboratory employee and Bishop of the Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Los Alamos ward, to take part in the marathon.

  • Michelle Holland became a poet in high school. She liked to write but staying in the rules and guidelines of writing just wasn’t her thing.

    “I wasn’t a very good prose writer in high school,” she said, “(but) I wanted to write. I liked to keep a journal but I wasn’t good at putting together sentences and paragraphs.”

    Poetry offered a way out of all the rules. She wrote the way she thought poetry should be written.

  • The YMCA is the place to be this Saturday as youth across the nation celebrate YMCA Healthy Kids Day.

    The free fun is a national YMCA event intended to give youth an opportunity to visit their local YMCA and discover some of the activities, programs and events that it offers.

    The nationwide slogan of “Put Play in Your Day,” emphasizes the more fun youth have participating in physical activity, the more likely they are to continue and to lead a healthy life style.

  • Do Los Alamos Big Band Leader Jan McDonald and Southwest Jazz Orchestra Founder Jack Manno together have a total of 100 years of experience in the music business? “Not quite,” said  McDonald. “But almost,” Manno added.

      The long-time collaborators will cover almost but not quite 100 years of jazz history in two sets of toe-tapping music from their two aggregations at the 2nd annual “Swing into Spring” concert at  7 p.m. April 28 at the Duane W. Smith Auditorium.

  • When you are growing up, you are an egg wishing to be a cake. It hurts to be so small. You have this horrible shell. You live in a dark carton. No one notices how different you’re from the other eggs. Then one day you are a cake. You are sweet. You are decorated. People celebrate with you. Nevertheless, you  wish you could go back to being an egg.

  • Betty Ehart Senior Center volunteer Mary Venable began a monthly support group for those facing macular degeneration and hearing challenges more than three years ago.

    The group often acquired a guest speaker, then with the help of community organizer, Karen Edwards, held a low vision expo several months later.

    “Macular Degeneration and hearing loss are of epidemic proportions and so much denial, even in our beloved community,” Venable said, who herself has some challenges.

  • Chamisa Elementary School transforms into a one-stop shop and mini mall this weekend, for early birds to gear up for a bit of Mother’s Day shopping.

    Scentsy Independent Consultant Tiffany Lovell is the mastermind behind the Mother’s Day Boutique, from 8 a.m.- 1p.m. Saturday.

    The more than 30 vendors include representatives for everything from Tupperware and homemade jewelry to Mary Kay Cosmetics and hand-made crafts, available for purchase for any gift-giving occasion.

  • The 60th birthday party for Los Alamos  County will take place June 10. As the community marks this milestone with a year-long calendar of events to honor the occasion, Living Treasures of Los Alamos celebrates its 10th anniversary by honoring Laurence Martin “Marty” Holland; Lawry and Alice Mann; and Dale Holm at 2 p.m. Sunday at the Betty Ehart Senior Center.

  • Before the Manhattan Project and previous to the Ranch School, there were homesteaders.

    In 1862, the U.S. Congress passed the Homesteaders Act, Los Alamos author Dorothy Hoard said. Under this act, people applied for entry to live on a piece of land.

  • This week we look at Asset #7 Community Values Youth. According to the Search Institute, youth are more likely to grow up healthy when they perceive that adults in the community value youth.

    When I started my interest in working with Assets, our community rated 15 percent, according to our youth, on how the community valued them. While the current data results aren’t due back for a few months, I’m certain the tide is changing.