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Today's Features

  • The holiday season possesses a lot of unique qualities – characteristics that do not often appear during the rest of the year. Snow and the spirit of giving are a few features that are highly visible everywhere this time of year, but Los Alamos has a few holiday characteristics of its very own.

  • We all know that December can be a stressful, mad rush to buy gifts, mail out holiday greetings and overload credit cards. But there is another side to this season and it's called Yule – the old holy day of northern European Pagans.

    Yule, the festival of the Winter Solstice, is celebrated between Dec. 20 and 23 based on the solar calendar. This year, it is on Sunday. In the Wiccan/Pagan Wheel of the year, Yule is a solar holiday, celebrating fire, whether the fire is the sun, the hearth fire or the flame of a candle.

  • During this particular time of year, with its many holidays, it seems required that music be played to fully celebrate all the festivities.

    For one particular holiday, Christmas, the sound of brass instruments might be the perfect way to fulfill this requirement.

    Therefore, the community is invited to attend a free brass concert at 7:30 p.m. Saturday at Immaculate Heart of Mary Church.

  • Many people know the concept of the healing nature of the Southwest’s dry, sunny climate, but few perhaps recognize that so many immigrants to the region came because of lung ailments or that the treatment of tuberculosis subsequently became a major industry.

    A new, temporary exhibit that examines these themes is on display during the month of December at the Los Alamos Historical Museum.

  • It may be camouflaged in powdery white snow, but there seems to be a real art to winter walking.

    I was greeted with a surprise when I walked out the door on Tuesday morning; my car was up to its wheels in snow and with no snow shovel at my disposal, I decided to walk to the office. Along the way, I saw art all around me – patterns of shoe soles sculpted the snow, the streets were molded with intricate, slushy, textured designs made by tire treads and even the sky was an abstract painting of grays and whites.

  • Albuquerque – Jeff Sargent of Los Alamos was one of several maintenance staff who earned a 2008 Ben Luján Maintenance Achievement Award. In total, eight school districts and 19 district staffers, received awards. The school districts that received awards were Aztec, Carlsbad, Gadsden, Peñasco, Roswell, Silver, Tatum and Truth or Consequences.

  • Confused about how our public schools are funded? You’re not alone! A convergence of three major events will affect Los Alamos Public Schools (LAPS) for many years to come. They are distinctly different, and need to be kept separate, not only in the practice of acquiring and spending funds, but also in the understanding of how these funds can be used.

  • This week, we look at Asset number 32, Planning and Decision Making. According to the Search-Institute, “Youth are more likely to grow up healthy when they know how to plan ahead and make choices.”

    For those of you who know me well, I’ll take a short pause to allow time for you to guffaw. I do get an awful lot done, but I’ll tell you, that it is by the grace of God that things get accomplished and it has very little to do with me.

  • As a core member of the Austin-based Conspirare, Nicole Lamartine has just received two Grammy Award nominations for the professional chorale ensemble’s recent CD, “Threshold of Night.” The nominations are for Best Classical Album and Best Choral Performance.

    “I was so excited,” said Lamartine during a telephone interview from Wyoming. “We are such a tight knit group and the second it came out I got an e-mail. It’s such an honor.”

  • The Alexander Girard collection at the Museum of International Folk Art in Santa Fe is not filled with glittery gems or shiny gold pieces that once belonged to royalty. No, this is a different type of collection.