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Today's Features

  • Tom and Penny Wyant, of Enchanted Trek Travel, will not be hosting their cruise night presentation today. It was held Thursday. To learn more contact Enchanted Trek Travel at 672-1981.

  • Of whom does Reformation remind you: Thomas Beza? Ulrich Zwingli? James Arminius? John Calvin? Probably all the above. The “Father of the Reformation,” Martin Luther, named after St. Martin of Tours, was very inquisitive and wanted to learn from the sages such as Aristotle, Plato, and Gabriel Biel. But two men who became his tutors (Bartholomaus Arnoldi von Usingen and Jodocus Trutfetter) taught Luther to be wary of even the great thinkers of the ages.

  • There are sites and activities that are deemed unique to Los Alamos and embraced by locals. But now, it is more than just Los Alamos residents who are noticing these local gifts.

    In fact, the New Mexico Recreation and Parks Association presented awards to the Los Alamos Recreation Division and the Parks Division during its annual conference in September.

    The recreation division received the Aquatic Program of the Year award for its Pumpkin Splash activity while the parks division earned the Park/Trails/Bike Path award for its design and master plan for Camp May.

  • “Play On!” proves that in the world of theater, occasionally nothing goes as planned. Everything you prepare and rehearse can fly out the window and chaos replaces order.

    It appears this is an accurate message because the Olions Thespian Club, the Los Alamos High School drama club, experienced an obstacle during the Saturday performance of “Play On!”

  • There is art in nature – a setting and rising sun, a blooming flower, a floating cloud. In fact, art is all around us.

    Sometimes artists take matters into their own hands to show people just how artistic nature can be. The natural world becomes the artist’s canvas to create an image. Robert Smithson shaped rocks into the “Spiral Jetty” in the Great Salt Lake, while Christo and Jeanne Claude have draped cloth material on various structures including a valley in Rifle, Colo., and islands off of Florida.

  • In Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet we hear the memorable lines, “A plague on both your houses!” The exhibition at the Art Center that opens Friday, with a reception from 5-7 p.m., is anything but a plague. The exhibit is a celebration of not only the house but the home as well.

  • I always thought break-dancing was just a quick trend, locked up tight in the 80s’ and only performed by odd balls wearing really bad outfits.

    Watching “Planet B-Boy” revealed just how wrong I was. The 80s just took an art form was ruined it by turning the art into commercialized tripe.

    Break dancing, according to this documentary, has nothing to do with acid washed jeans and more to do with a free form of self-expression. There aren’t really any set moves or guidelines, it’s more about what a particular dancer feels and wants to express.

  • Los Alamos Public Schools is sponsoring a Town Hall Meeting at 7 p.m. Thursday at Fuller Lodge, to review the implications of House Bill 241.

    It is expected the bill will be presented to the New Mexico Legislature during its upcoming session and, if enacted, could result in funding cuts of about $3 million to the Los Alamos Public Schools.

    Last year, Representative Mimi Stewart, D-Bernalillo, introduced this bill that revamps the educational funding formula currently used in New Mexico.

  • If Los Alamos writer Kendal Fortson’s book, “ Brother to Jackals,” was a song, it would be a cannon; and if it was a shape, it would be a Mbius strip.

    It appears Fortson has not been timid in his literary debut, he charged right in. The book, he said, is about “sex, drugs and existential dilemmas.”

    Pour Yorick Publishing, a New Mexico publishing company, released “Brother to Jackals,” this month.

  • The famous war correspondent Ernie Pyle grew up in Indiana but moved with his wife to New Mexico in the 1940s, just before World War II started. They made their home in Albuquerque and even though Pyle traveled to provide first-hand accounts of the war, he would make trips to New Mexico.

    Eventually, Pyle’s New Mexico home would be transformed into the Ernie Pyle Library, which is how Richard Melzer became introduced to this war correspondent.