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Today's Features

  • Throughout the school year, Los Alamos High School bands have been playing the tune of success and were able to finish their victorious score during the New Mexico Activities Association State Concert Festival in April.

    The winds ensemble and symphonic band traveled to Cibola High School in Albuquerque to compete. While the symphonic band performed for comments only, the winds ensemble captured first place in the AAAA division.

  • On Saturday morning, the Los Alamos community is encouraged to leave something other than letters or bill payments in their mailboxes.

    The Los Alamos Letter Carriers Union (NALC-4112) will pick up nonperishable food items as part of the 16th Annual National Association of Letter Carriers National Food Drive. Los Alamos letter carriers will not be doing this alone; letter carriers in White Rock, along with the Northern New Mexico District of Boy Scouts of America, will be collecting food items for LA Cares.

  • Whether you love the movie or have never even heard of Rick Moranis, the Olions’ production of “Little Shop of Horrors” will have you laughing the antics, caring about the characters and applauding wildly, standing in front of your Duane W. Smith seat.

    I enjoyed so many elements of the musical I almost don’t know where to begin. But, since it is “Little Shop of Horrors,” I’ll start with the plant.

    The plant is awesome.

  • It started out as the annual spring barbecue for the Pion Elementary Arbor Day but when the event concluded, much more was accomplished than just eating lunch.

    Melanie McKinley, of the Pion Elementary School Parent Teacher Organization, said in addition to the barbecue, which Cub Scout Pack 326 cooked, students and about 60 parents got their hands dirty and the campus beautiful.

  • In a foreign country, with a tour group full of people you don’t know, sometimes the best thing you can do is go to the gym.

    I need to pause for a disclaimer: If I am a rat of any kind, it is not a gym rat. I’m a road rat, a trail rat, a barre rat – but I don’t like the machines, the musk, the towels, the TVs or any of the complimentary ambience that comes along with a trip to the gym. I can’t stand the sound of the treadmill, the way my face looks in the mirror while I run or the useless, tiny cups of water.

  • The Art Center at Fuller Lodge invites the public to the opening reception for its newest exhibit, Traditional Fine Arts and Crafts, from 5-7 p.m. Friday.

  • Russian architect and artist, Viktor Alexandrovich Hartmann, grew up in St. Petersburg. He studied at the Academy of Fine Arts in St. Petersburg and at first started working by illustrating books.

    In his work as an architect, he sketched, among other things, the monument to the 1,000th anniversary of Russia in Novgorod, which was inaugurated in 1862. His watercolors and pencil drawings were often made while traveling abroad from 1864-1868. Hartmann was one of the first artists to include traditional Russian motifs in his work.

  • Sunday celebrates Beltane, or May Day, the third and last of the ancient Pagan fertility festivals. The first, Imbolc, is the first stirrings of the new season. The second, Ostara, celebrated at the spring equinox, recognizes spring has arrived. In many northern climates it is still too early to plant. Beltane would be the time when northern communities would be getting ready for their planting season.

  • Janet Bosarge of Los Alamos may not paint or photograph, but she does know the art of marketing. To help promote several local artists’ works and the work of visiting artists, Bosarge is hosting a fine arts party from 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Saturday at her home, located at 2326 Canyon Glen.

    Artists whose works will show at the party include sculptor John Fleming of Kirkland, Wash., photographer Harry Clifford of Los Alamos, painter Stede Barber of Los Alamos, painter Beth Ferguson of Abquu and Barb Ruble of Washington.

  • Los Alamos Little Theatre presents its final play this season, “The Importance of Being Earnest,” by Oscar Wilde. On its surface, the play is about two young men and their courtship with their respective girlfriends in the time of Queen Victoria.