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Today's Features

  • The room that is solely my grandmother’s domain is the kitchen. Her cookbooks fill the counters while photos of family and friends are taped up on the wall by the kitchen sink. Even though she is not cooking anymore, you can still see her puttering around this room.

    Since my grandmother’s big love was cooking it really isn’t any surprise the person she adored was Julia Child. My mother told me she even got to meet Child at a department store. The famous writer and cook performed a cooking demonstration and signed copies of her book.

  • Los Alamos’ history is well known. It is printed in the history books and mentioned in movies. But what about that ‘burb’ known as White Rock further down the Hill? What’s its story?

    A talk, “The History of White Rock,” which will be held at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday at White Rock Baptist Church, will answer many questions people might have about the area.

  • Monday marks the end of the summer and for a nearby Orthodox Monastery, the celebration of its annual feast day, the Feast of the Archangel Michael.  Each year this annual pilgrimage draws visitors from throughout New Mexico and Southern Colorado.  

    Members and the priest of Saint Dimitri Orthodox Church will join in the annual event with Rev. John Hennies, who serve as the priest at the Divine Liturgy, which will begin at 10 a.m. at the monastery church.  

  • Los Alamos loves its dogs. Their faces are seen on computer desktops, their photos are preserved in glass frames and their images are printed on calendars.

    You can see them and their owners trotting down Los Alamos’ sidewalks or zooming around one of the townsite’s dog parks.

  • The word “local” carries with it a kind of stigma.

    One on hand, we feel like we should buy local and support our immediate community.

    On the other hand, we tend to act as though products made and sold far away are actually better – as though we’re doing the locals a huge favor with our generosity.

    But we’ve got it backward. Los Alamos contains a lot of smart people, and many of these people don’t work at the lab.

  • Community Education students at UNM-Los Alamos built an electronic vehicle in just one month this summer.

    Instructor Michael Ham and his classes produced a working prototype of TWEAK (Three-Wheeled Electric Alternative by KinAesthetic Wind).

    “The idea was to build a small commuter vehicle that would be inexpensive — similar to a motorcycle but safer,” Ham said.

  • Gerald “Jerry” Eagon worked at Los Alamos National Laboratory for 40 years. When he retired, he wondered what he would do to pass the time. Little did he know, he would be on the road every week around Los Alamos with a truckload of food and learning one of life’s great lessons.

    He has worked as a volunteer in the Meals on Wheels program for six years. He said he enjoys the work and being outside.

  • This week we look at the Asset category of Boundaries and Expectations. I’ve heard from a great deal of you this week about how you enjoyed making the connection not just to youth, but to the office, co-workers or the community in general.

    So this week, we’ll talk about Boundaries and Expectations and how they relate to the flu. The last week and a half have been a great trial run for us. Oh, once we pass the hump, please don’t get too comfy that our time with the flu is done.

  • When it comes to raising money, the United Way Youth Team is one well-trained fundraising machine. In fact, the group of young people has run a successful campaign every year since team’s inception.

    Team members have either met or exceeded their goals, Carla Gray Weisler, marketing director for United Way of Northern New Mexico, told Los Alamos Public School Board Thursday night. For instance, last year the team exceeded its $7,000 goal by $3,000. “We’re very proud of our youth team,” she said.