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Today's Features

  • The local Alzheimer’s Support Group will host the first Alzheimer’s Café from 2-4 p.m. Thursday at the White Rock Baptist Church.

    “We first heard of the idea from a postcard for the Santa Fe Alzheimer’s Cafe,” said Vickie Griffis, support group organizer. “We did a little research and found out these cafés are opening up all over the world. The first one opened in the Netherlands in 1997 to support caregivers.”

  • This Friday, folks at Piñon Elementary will put their backs into some shovel work to beautify the campus and celebrate Arbor Day.

    “We are having a school-wide event for campus beautification that includes rotational activities for students with everything from helping improve our field, a walk a thon for our track fundraiser, planting trees an hedges to PEEC activities,” Principal Megan Lee said.

    PTO President Melanie McKinley is thrilled about the event and their sponsors.

  • The Los Alamos Youth Leadership program works hard throughout the community all year long. The ninth through 12-grade students attend a two-day summer leadership orientation before being divided into teams that work together during the school year.

    The 30 students are divided into three teams that work on a variety of projects that benefit the community in many ways.

    The teams select names, assign duties and carry out out tasks all in the name of community and leadership.

  • This week, we take a look at Asset #8, Youth as Resources. According to the Search Institute, “Youth are more likely to grow up healthy when they are given useful roles in the community.”

    This asset might be best understood by first approaching it from a family perspective. Do your children or grandchildren have tasks they do as a useful role in the family? Even if they don’t admit it, that’s where it all begins. Everyone needs to have a role in the family to feel like a valued part of it.

  • Stephen Betts ran track and cross-country for one-and-a-half years in high school and then hung up his running shoes. Well, the running shoes are coming down because Betts, a Los Alamos resident, is taking on the mother lode of races, the Boston Marathon.

    Two things inspired Betts, a Los Alamos National Laboratory employee and Bishop of the Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Los Alamos ward, to take part in the marathon.

  • Michelle Holland became a poet in high school. She liked to write but staying in the rules and guidelines of writing just wasn’t her thing.

    “I wasn’t a very good prose writer in high school,” she said, “(but) I wanted to write. I liked to keep a journal but I wasn’t good at putting together sentences and paragraphs.”

    Poetry offered a way out of all the rules. She wrote the way she thought poetry should be written.

  • The YMCA is the place to be this Saturday as youth across the nation celebrate YMCA Healthy Kids Day.

    The free fun is a national YMCA event intended to give youth an opportunity to visit their local YMCA and discover some of the activities, programs and events that it offers.

    The nationwide slogan of “Put Play in Your Day,” emphasizes the more fun youth have participating in physical activity, the more likely they are to continue and to lead a healthy life style.

  • Do Los Alamos Big Band Leader Jan McDonald and Southwest Jazz Orchestra Founder Jack Manno together have a total of 100 years of experience in the music business? “Not quite,” said  McDonald. “But almost,” Manno added.

      The long-time collaborators will cover almost but not quite 100 years of jazz history in two sets of toe-tapping music from their two aggregations at the 2nd annual “Swing into Spring” concert at  7 p.m. April 28 at the Duane W. Smith Auditorium.

  • When you are growing up, you are an egg wishing to be a cake. It hurts to be so small. You have this horrible shell. You live in a dark carton. No one notices how different you’re from the other eggs. Then one day you are a cake. You are sweet. You are decorated. People celebrate with you. Nevertheless, you  wish you could go back to being an egg.

  • Betty Ehart Senior Center volunteer Mary Venable began a monthly support group for those facing macular degeneration and hearing challenges more than three years ago.

    The group often acquired a guest speaker, then with the help of community organizer, Karen Edwards, held a low vision expo several months later.

    “Macular Degeneration and hearing loss are of epidemic proportions and so much denial, even in our beloved community,” Venable said, who herself has some challenges.