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Today's Features

  • It’s that time of year again.  The leaves are turning and there is a chill in the air.  Fall is here and so is the Fourth Annual Piñon Elementary School Pumpkin Patch.

    The event will take place from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturday at the school, located at 90 Grand Canyon Drive in White Rock.

    This year, not only will pumpkins and baked goods be sold, but there will be lots of fun activities for children. The PTO will provide face painting, craft projects, games and a bouncy house.  Admission costs $1 per child.

  • There are a lot of rookies in the Los Alamos High School Marching Band, including the new band director, Zane Meek.  However, their performance at two recent competitions, the Pageant of the Bands and the Zia Competition, proved that while they maybe newcomers, they definitely have talent.   

  • Theodore “Dutch” Van Kirk, the navigator for the Enola Gay, will be in Los Alamos Sunday for an appearance and book signing sponsored by the Los Alamos Historical Society. One of two surviving crewmembers of the Enola Gay, Van Kirk served as the navigator for the 509th Composite Group, the squadron that ultimately delivered the atomic bombs on Japan.

    Tickets for the event are $5 and are available at the Los Alamos Historical Museum Shop, 1050 Bathtub Row, just north of Fuller Lodge.

  • It’s amazing that the book, “Where the Wild Things Are” only needed a few sentences to become beloved by young readers for generations. It’s not just the words that resonate with people – you see the story’s illustrations everywhere – coffee cups, T-shirts, posters and stuffed animals. To make a movie after a book that every kid has read and memorized and that features illustrations that everyone recognizes seems tough. There is sure to be someone who will huff, “This is not as good as the book.”

  • ­­I’ve always been proud of my independence. I feel as though I can go anywhere by myself – a movie, a restaurant, another country – and be just fine.

     I still relish the time in high school when I traveled to London with a school group proceeded to purchase a ticket to see an evening production of the musical, “Rent.” I traveled to and from the theater all by myself.

  • Russ Gordon, organizer of the Los Alamos County Summer Concert Series, is putting on a show Friday although not in the usual settings.

    Acoustic slide guitarist and banjo player Tony Furtado will perform at 8 p.m. at the Blue Window Bistro. Tickets for the concert cost $12.

    Hearing Furtado live is well worth the money, which will help support next years’ summer concert series.

  • The Rotary Club of Los Alamos recently honored Emma Catherine Carroll as the Student of the Month for September.  

    Emma is the daughter of David Carroll (’Topper Class of 1965) and Janice Carroll, an LAPS teacher.  Her sister Anna Carroll is a sophomore at LAHS.

  • Most parents have had at least one altercation with a car seat.  

    Whether trying to rescue a child from an aggressive seat belt or working up a sweat trying to get the seat belt to buckle, car seats can be frustrating.  And often in the end it is uncertain if the car seat was installed properly.

    Parents put their children in car seats to protect them.  

    However, there are many styles of car seats and just as many types of vehicles in which to install them, often making installing a car seat a daunting experience.

  • Being healthy has its challenges. It can be tough to remember to get your flu shot, schedule every doctor’s check-up and eat nutritious foods. Luckily, the Los Alamos Heart Council, the Los Alamos Medical Center and the Los Alamos County Library System are extending a helping hand. These agencies are bringing health care services to the public and conveniently located them under one roof.  

  • Piñon Elementary School students were recognized recently for their efforts in reading.

    The students’ work ethic will demonstrate that with self-discipline they can succeed academically and socially in future years.

    “Their work ethic is a model for all students,” Principal Megan Lee said. “Most students read many books and others practiced math skills, learned about science and even created a blog about the environment.”