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Today's Features

  • United Way of Northern New Mexico would like to thank Metzger’s Do It Best for their generous gift of just over $700 from their successful Small Business Saturday.

    United Way of Northern New Mexico and Metzger’s have been partners since Small Business Saturday began encouraging businesses to donate to nonprofits in 2012. 

    Together, UWNNM and Metzger’s have raised thousands of dollars to support the mission of UWNNM and the people of Northern New Mexico.

  • With the holidays and 2018 approaching, Bandelier National Monument is offering news on upcoming events, both this year and next.  

    First on the list is Winter Solstice, Dec. 21, shortest day of the year and the point on the calendar when the days begin to lengthen again.  Many peoples all over the world recognized the solstices and built markers into structures or found them in the surrounding landscape.

    The Ancestral Pueblo people in Frijoles Canyon may have built parts of Tyuonyi, the large pueblo on the canyon bottom, in alignment with the sunrise and sunset on the Winter Solstice.  Ranger walks will be offered that day to greet the sunrise and sunset and see the possible alignments.  The Sunrise Walk meets at 7:15 a.m. in front of the Visitor Center, and the Sunset Walk meets there at 1:30 p.m.  The times are a reminder that sunrise and sunset happen at different times in the bottom of the 400-foot-deep canyon than they do in the wide-open landscapes on the mesa tops.  No signups are required for these walks, but participants should be sure to dress warmly.  If the sky is overcast, the walks will be held the following day.

    The Visitor Center, book store, and administrative offices in Frijoles Canyon will be closed on Dec. 25 and Jan. 1, and the snack bar is closed until March.

  • When a veterinarian uses a stethoscope to listen to your dog’s heart, chances are that the heart will sound normal. However, in some cases, a veterinarian may hear an abnormality such as a heart murmur.

    Sonya Wesselowski, a clinical assistant professor of cardiology at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, said heart murmurs are abnormal heart sounds caused by turbulent or rapid blood flow within the heart. In dogs, heart murmurs are usually the result of a leaky or narrowed heart valve.

    Heart murmurs are not always a cause for concern. Wesselowski said that some soft heart murmurs could be normal in growing puppies less than 6 months of age. However, most heart murmurs in dogs do indicate that there is an underlying abnormality of the heart. In some cases, the heart murmur could be caused by a congenital heart defect the dog was born with, or due to a heart disease that develops later in life.

    How can you know if your dog has a heart murmur? Wesselowski said that regular examinations with your veterinarian are crucial for detection of heart murmurs, as a heart murmur itself does not cause any signs or symptoms. Instead, a heart murmur is a finding that suggests a cardiac problem may be present.

  • Paxton is all tail-wagging, toy-squeaking, puppy dog, a kind-hearted American Staffordshire terrier who enjoys a friendly visit with other dogs.

    Rated RTP or “ready to play,” Paxton seems perfectly happy and has plenty of energy, say the folks at the Los Alamos County Animal Shelter.

    He is 13 weeks olds and will be equipped with a microchip very soon. He’s been neutered. He was a transfer from another shelter. Due to his youth, his outlook on cats and other issues are unknown.

    This boy will get big, however, and his exercise schedule should be fully booked.

    Adoption fee is $100. Please contact the Los Alamos County Animal Shelter at (505) 662-8179 or communicate police-psa@lacnm.us.
     

  • Researchers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory released 62 newly declassified videos Thursday of atmospheric nuclear tests films.

    The videos are the second batch of scientific test films to be published on the LLNL YouTube channel this year. The team plans to publish the remaining videos of tests conducted by LLNL as they are scanned and approved for public release.

    LLNL nuclear weapon physicist Gregg Spriggs is leading a team of film experts, code developers and interns on a mission to hunt down, scan and reanalyze what they estimate to be 10,000 films of the 210 atmospheric tests conducted by the U.S. between 1945 and 1962.

    With many of the films suffering from physical decay, their goal is to preserve this priceless record before it’s lost forever, and to provide more accurate scientific data to colleagues who are responsible for certifying the stockpile every year.

    “We’ve received a lot of demand for these videos and the public has a right to see this footage,” said Spriggs. “Not only are we preserving history, but we’re getting much more consistent answers with our calculations.

  • Art exhibits
    House of Eternal Return, Meow Wolf. A unique art experience featuring a wild new form of non-linear storytelling, which includes exploration, discovery and 21st century interactivity. Located at 1352 Rufina Circle, Santa Fe. Call 395-6369 for information. Hours are Sunday through Thursday 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Closed every Tuesday. Friday and Saturday 10 a.m.-10 p.m.

    New Mexico History Museum and Santa Fe Opera to recognize “Atomic Histories” in 2018 and 2019. The History Museum’s exhibition opens June 3 and will run through May 2019. The History Museum is located at 113 Lincoln Ave. in Santa Fe. Call 476-5200 for information. Hours are 10 a.m.-5 p.m. daily, May through October and closed Mondays November through April.

    Taos Art Museum at Fechin House will present a retrospective exhibition of the artwork of painter Walt Gonske, to open at the beginning of the Taos Fall Arts Festival. The exhibition runs through Jan. 7, 2018. Winter hours (through April 30) are Tuesday through Sunday, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Summer hours (starting May 1) are Tuesday through Sunday 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
    Cooking
    Gluten-Free Holiday baking class from 1:30-5:30 p.m. Friday at the United Church, 2525 Canyon Road in Los Alamos. Cost is $10. Contact the LA Cooperative Extension Service, 662-2656.
    Dance

  • Local residents Janet Harris and Jennifer Jordan tied for first place in the Los Alamos Small Business Saturday GooseChase Scavenger Hunt, and were each awarded $200 in Chamber Checks.

    This year, Los Alamos Small Business Saturday shoppers had the chance to join in some scavenger hunt fun through a smart phone app called GooseChase. 

    “GooseChase scavenger hunts combine the fun of a traditional scavenger hunt with smart phone technology,” said Los Alamos Commerce and Development Corporation Executive Director Patrick Sullivan. “It’s a great way to give shoppers a fun reason to get around to as many businesses as possible, accumulate points in real-time, and this year’s winners visited some local businesses they didn’t even know existed!”

    The Los Alamos Small Business Saturday Scavenger Hunt opened at 9 a.m. Nov. 25 and closed at 5 p.m. Dec 2. Scavenger hunt participants downloaded the GooseChase app on their smart phones, signed into the “SmallBizSaturday” game, then visited the listed businesses and took pictures of themselves at each location. 

    The photos are submitted through the app awarding points in real-time at each location. Scavenger hunt participants could be in teams or individuals.

  • The New Mexico History Museum and the Santa Fe Opera will each feature presentations exploring New Mexico’s Atomic Histories in 2018 and 2019.

    The History Museum’s Atomic Histories exhibition opens June 3, 2018 and will run through May 2019.

    The exhibition will highlight American artist Meridel Rubenstein’s artwork including two photo/video/glass/steel installations from the traveling exhibition Critical Mass (1993-97) and Oppenheimer’s Chair (1995) commissioned by the first SITE Santa Fe Biennial to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the first atomic test.

    “To enhance understanding of the legacy of the Manhattan Project, the New Mexico History Museum is developing an interpretive exploration of our state’s atomic history,” said Andrew Wulf, executive director of the New Mexico History Museum.   

    “Through our extensive collaboration with the Los Alamos History Museum, the Atomic Heritage Foundation, the Santa Fe Opera, Los Alamos’ Bradbury Science Museum and the National Museum of Nuclear Science and History,  the New Mexico History Museum will exhibit a wide variety of resources to tell our state’s nuclear story,” said Melanie LaBorwit, Museum Educator.