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Today's Features

  • Young

    entrepreneurs

    On behalf of the Los Alamos Commerce and Development Corporation and the UNM-LA Small Business Development Center, we would like to extend a large thank you to the following companies, organizations and individuals for their support of the 2009 Youth Business Grant Program.  In its 24th year, the program provides an opportunity for youth in the area to learn the basics of entrepreneurship and business operation.  The program would not be possible without the contributions of time, money, and energy from a variety of sources.

  • This week we take a look at Asset #20, Time at Home.  According to the Search Institute, “Youth are more likely to grow up healthy when they go out ‘with nothing special to do’ two or fewer nights per week.”

    Now I’m glad that little quote comes directly from the Search Institute because I swear I heard audible gasps coming from homes throughout the community on that one. I think I’d like to rephrase this one to ask, do your children like to be at home?

  • Dean of Instruction Kate Massengale was recently granted tenure at UNM-Los Alamos. She is the first ever tenured faculty member at UNM-LA. In addition, Massengale was promoted from assistant to associate professor.

    “We are looking to build a more substantial group of tenured faculty at UNM-LA,” Massengale said. “The UNM administration in Albuquerque has made a commitment to this endeavor, which shows their ongoing support for UNM-LA.”

  • The dogs trotted around as if they were  warming up for the task ahead of them. Clancey, a coon hound and Osita, a Bouvier des Flandres, seemed excited as they sniffed the ground and the air. Somewhere in the forest surrounding the Pajarito Mountain Ski Area, people were lost and last Saturday morning, the two dogs, along with three volunteers from Mountain Canine Corps, a nonprofit search and rescue organization, prepared to find them.

  • Los Alamos changed a lot since Kathleen “Kay” Manley first arrived in 1943. She watched the town evolve from a secret place that was hidden from the map to an official county of New Mexico. She saw muddy roads become paved streets and neighborhoods appear.

    But Kay did not passively watch these changes from the sidelines; she helped to nurture the local community in several areas including music.

  • Los Alamos First United Methodist Church’s Vacation Bible School will not be a run-of-the-mill classroom lecture.

    Rather than sitting at desks, the Bible school is turning learning about Christianity into a game.

    In fact, the theme for the Vacation Bible School is Studio Go Theme Show.

    Camille Westcott, organizer for the Vacation Bible School, explained each day the program will start and end with a game-show and students will have the opportunity to compete in the game and win prizes.

  • His humor has been called impish, his songwriting skills have been referred to as creative and his performances are honored as being fearless. Steve Poltz’s music summons a barrage of descriptions and his life reflects his work.

    According to his website, Poltz was born in Nova Scotia; he was raised in Palm Springs and went to college in San Diego.

    He performed with the band, Rugburns, spending the majority of the year touring in a beat-up van and the song he co-wrote with Jewel, “You Were Meant for Me,” landed on the Billboard Top 10.

  • More than 250 local Harry Potter fans turned out at the Reel Deal Theater for a midnight showing of “Harry Potter and the Half Blood Prince” Tuesday night.

    The mass of Harry Potter devotees – the majority of whom were around the same age as the film’s hero, 16-year-old Harry Potter (played by 20-year-old Daniel Radcliffe)– was enough to fill two screens at the Reel Deal Theatre.

    The enthusiastic crowd – including some who waited in line over five hours - applauded as the lights dimmed in the theater at the start of the show.

  • Writer’s block – a dull name for a horribly dull feeling. I picture my parietal cortex lying on a well-used wooden cutting board, an Alaskan ulu knife beside it, eager, the way all knives are.

    I don’t mean to overdramatize. That is how it feels: Like part of my brain is utterly inaccessible. It might still be inside my skull. It might be in the kitchen with the dirty ice cream bowl. Either way, all I get is a headache.

  • Rows of pristine, shiny cars can be spotted Saturday at the Elks Lodge #2083.

    Viewers will be treated to a wide range of automobiles including vintage, muscle, Euro and just plain unique cars. Additionally, motorcycles and antique tractors will be presented.

    This show is more than just automobile eye candy; proceeds from car registrations, which is $25 per vehicle, will go toward several charity organizations. Valerie Wilson of the Elks Lodge said the Elks’ main charity is the National Cerebral Palsy Foundation.