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Today's Features

  • The Los Alamos Coffeehouse was a tradition for years. When the concert series came to a close in 2008, music fans across the county collectively sighed in a minor key and when violinist Kay Newnam and the Los Alamos Arts Council announced the return of the Coffeehouse for a special, one-time event, it was like the moment when a favorite musical theme makes its comeback in a long, challenging composition.

  • Exhibits ranging from finely sewn quilts to vegetable baskets were exhibited during the County Fair.  The entries were displayed at Mesa Public Library.

  • As missionaries through the Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Church, Sister Ormsby and Sister Jensen are reaching out in an attempt to form a bond with the local community. Their tool to create ties between themselves and Los Alamos is music.

    Ormsby and Jensen will present a devotional set to music titled, “The Restoration,” at 6 p.m. Sunday at the Los Alamos Ward of the LDS church.

    “Basically it’s going to be explaining in music how our religion came about,” Ormsby said.

  • Rick Estrin didn’t have a whole lot of interests as a child. School bored him, too. Music, however, snared his attention. “There was just something about it that spoke to me inside,” Estrin said.

    Even though he didn’t know exactly what he was doing when he first started out as a musician and did a lot of guessing, Estrin said his music has evolved throughout the years.

    Plus, Estrin said his distinctive personality has carried him through the years. “(I’m) sort of a peculiar person,” he said.

  • Along Longview Drive in White Rock, there are rows of empty buildings and a sidewalk outlined with weeds. It has the atmosphere of a ghost town – there does not seem to be a soul around. But further up the road, things dramatically change.

    The weeds along the sidewalk are replaced by orange colored flower boxes and the building, located at 115 Longview Drive, is being renovated, making it look sharp and new.

    This will be the new home of the Bilingual Montessori School.

  • In one of my all-time favorite books, “A Patchwork Planet,” by Anne Tyler, the main character reminisces about his days as a juvenile delinquent. Barnaby describes the times when he and his friends would break into people’s houses and steal things.

    But what was unusual, Barnaby says, was while his friends went straight to the liquor cabinet or snatched up valuable possessions, he picked up the unique knick-knacks, pored over photos and read through the mail.

    He may have thought that was odd but I did not. I pretty much love to do the same thing.

  • Have you been thinking about sprucing up your living room with a new painting? Saturday, a dozen painters will offer their work to fill up the blank spaces on your walls during the 32nd Annual Summer Arts and Crafts Fair on the lawn at Fuller Lodge.

  • An old saying goes, “The opera ain’t over till the fat lady sings,” and last Saturday night we found out again how true old sayings are and how worth waiting for this great lady is.  

    In the final opening of the Santa Fe Opera season, Christine Brewer was luminous in the title role of Queen Alceste, an opera by Bohemian Christoph Willibald Gluck, first produced in Paris the year our Declaration of Independence was signed.

  • Tom and Marlene Kelley’s dancing shoes are well worn. The couple has strapped them on since 1977.

    That was the year they joined the Mountain Mixers, the local square dancing club.

    Tom is originally from Los Alamos but they lived for some time in Florida. The Kelleys returned to Los Alamos in 1976.

    For an anniversary present, Tom’s parents gave them square dancing lessons.

    Thirty-two years later, they are still cutting loose on the dance floor.

  • William Repass, violist, will perform a senior recital at 1:30 p.m. Saturday at the Betty Ehart Senior Center. Family, friends and the public are invited.

    Repass began playing viola in the fourth grade under the guidance of Cheryl Smith-Ecke. Shortly thereafter, he began private lessons with Marion Pack, which continues to this date. He has also studied under Michael Gyurik in the Summer Strings Program and in the High School Symphonic Orchestra.