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Today's Features

  • Perhaps it seems as though paper is taking a backseat to PDF’s and e- books are flourishing while conventional books collect dust on shelves, but the art of making a book is far from being lost or dead.

    For instance, Mesa Public Library is hosting an exhibit by Libros New Mexico Book Arts Guild, which started Monday and will run though March 26.  A reception and workshop on how to make a handmade book will be held from 1:30-3:30 p.m. March 13 at the library.

  • My puppy’s stalking snowflakes, back and snout forming a long, gray line against a wet, white yard. An hour ago she sat on the arm of the couch, her front paws on the carpet and my husband commented lovingly, “She looks like a vulture.”

    Sick people need puppies. I hope to be fully healthy by the time this column goes to print, but this past week I have been stuck at home coughing. I seem to have caught the same cold as everyone else, though it has hit me a little harder, maybe because I’m five-months pregnant.

  • A paradigm shift is occurring at Los Alamos Public Schools. This change is focusing on how students are graded. The old paper and pencil system is being tossed away in favor of an electronic grade book called Pinnacle. Read more about Pinnacle in tomorrow's paper.

  • This winter – like, let’s be honest, all hibernation seasons – has been entirely about food.

    Last month, the library put mozzarella and meatballs on the screen with “Big Night.” Before that, the film series served up “Fried Green Tomatoes,” “My Big Fat Greek Wedding” (complete with lamb for the vegetarians) and even a big, delicious slice of interracial politics in “Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner.”

    It’s enough to throw off anyone’s diet.

  • Fred Harvey, a food entrepreneur, grew disgusted with the poor quality “greasy spoon” restaurants found near all-western railroad depots in the 1870s.

    Harvey convinced the Santa Fe Railroad to let him test out his own food service ideas and in 1876 opened his first lunchroom at Topeka’s Santa Fe station.

    His formula was clean silverware, fresh tablecloths and napkins and good food served promptly by wholesome young women soon tagged with the name, the “Harvey Girls.”

  • Fifteen Aspen Elementary School students competed for the first time in the national chess tournament held Dec. 11-13 in Dallas. Several students took home trophies.

  • On Feb. 25, the Los Alamos Public Schools Youth Summit Meeting was held in the district boardroom. Assistant Superintendent Kate Thomas facilitated the 45 participants.

    Principals from every school were also in attendance and reported on the percentage of attendance, discipline referrals, grades and counselor referrals for each of their schools.  

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  • Great things can be accomplished through collaboration. So expect the music notes to fly in grand fashion when two groups join forces during the upcoming Brown Bag concert, which will be held at 12:30 p.m. Wednesday at Fuller Lodge.

    The Amrahn Trio and the Black Mesa Brass will perform in the free concert, which is sponsored by the Los Alamos Arts Council.

    The players in the Amrahn Trio include Cindy Little, pianist; Louise Mendius, soprano; and John Hargreaves, French horn player.

  • An upcoming fundraiser is presenting the community with a win-win situation.

    Participants at the fundraiser can treat themselves to a meal and an evening out while supporting a worthy cause.