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Today's Features

  • Have you been thinking about sprucing up your living room with a new painting? Saturday, a dozen painters will offer their work to fill up the blank spaces on your walls during the 32nd Annual Summer Arts and Crafts Fair on the lawn at Fuller Lodge.

  • An old saying goes, “The opera ain’t over till the fat lady sings,” and last Saturday night we found out again how true old sayings are and how worth waiting for this great lady is.  

    In the final opening of the Santa Fe Opera season, Christine Brewer was luminous in the title role of Queen Alceste, an opera by Bohemian Christoph Willibald Gluck, first produced in Paris the year our Declaration of Independence was signed.

  • Tom and Marlene Kelley’s dancing shoes are well worn. The couple has strapped them on since 1977.

    That was the year they joined the Mountain Mixers, the local square dancing club.

    Tom is originally from Los Alamos but they lived for some time in Florida. The Kelleys returned to Los Alamos in 1976.

    For an anniversary present, Tom’s parents gave them square dancing lessons.

    Thirty-two years later, they are still cutting loose on the dance floor.

  • William Repass, violist, will perform a senior recital at 1:30 p.m. Saturday at the Betty Ehart Senior Center. Family, friends and the public are invited.

    Repass began playing viola in the fourth grade under the guidance of Cheryl Smith-Ecke. Shortly thereafter, he began private lessons with Marion Pack, which continues to this date. He has also studied under Michael Gyurik in the Summer Strings Program and in the High School Symphonic Orchestra.

  • Zetha Warren turned 100 years old Friday and her birthday was marked with numerous celebrations. Warren, who is a resident of Sombrillo Nursing and Rehabilitation Center, had a birthday party with family and friends at the nursing center and later celebrated with about 40 family members at White Rock Methodist Church.

  • This week we look at the next 20 steps on the path, the External Assets. These are the Assets that as adults on the sidelines, we can directly impact.

    These are the easy assets, the ones we don’t have to make too much of an effort to demonstrate. Think about it, honesty, integrity, responsibility, you may occasionally have to intentionally think about them, but it doesn’t take much to do the right thing.

  • History does not remain in the past, stuck on some dusty, ignored library shelf. Recently, students all over the country proved just how important and relevant the subject is during the National History Day competition held June 13-18 at the University of Maryland.

    Several Los Alamos students participated in the competition. Hannah Denever and Ellen Rabin competed in the senior group exhibit category and Lizzie Wasileska and Shannon Burns each entered in the senior individual documentary category.

  • For a while the two church buildings stood side by side – the 50-year-old building and the young one growing up beside it. Then suddenly the old building laid crumbled in piles and the young church continued to develop.

    The old may have been done away for the new, but whatever form it is in, Crossroads Bible Church is striving to follow the same objectives as it has in the past.

  • Pop!

    That’s the opening note of “The Letter” the Santa Fe Opera’s newly commissioned production that opened this week. A flimsy pistol shot repeated five more times demands immediate attention.

    Then, over a dead body and around a woman in a nightgown, a non-stop bullet train rolled through.

    There was never any question about who did it. Leslie Crosbie, the wife of a plantation-owner in British Malaya, pursues her victim in from the veranda and shoots him again and again.

  • The first time Texan Americana musician Ray Wylie Hubbard came to Los Alamos, there was a cloud hanging over the town, literally.

    The Cerro Grande Fire had just finished rampaging through the area and people were anxious to see what  had happened to their houses, family and friends.

    Despite the dour situation, Hubbard’s memories of the place are pleasant.

    He described the crowd as being “warm and generous.”

    “We had a great time,” Hubbard said.