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Today's Features

  • J. Michael Orenduff, author of the popular “Pot Thief” mysteries, returns to Los Alamos from 4-6 p.m. May 21 to sign “The Pot Thief Who Studied Ptolemy” and partake in a Dutch-treat dinner at the Hill Diner afterwards.

  • Founders of the Pajarito Dance Project Melissa Balice, Alina Deshpande and Julia Fair are presenting a one-hour dance showcase, a mix of cultural styles and different techniques, “Every! Buddy! Dance!” at 7 p.m. May 20 at the Duane Smith Auditorium.

    Doors open at 6:30 p.m.  

    The $1 donation per person includes admission to the show and a raffle ticket for a chance to win items such as Fair’s original jewelry, a Spanish shawl similar to the ones used in the dance and Los Alamos Chamber Bucks.

  • This has been a Spark-tacular week for the Assets program.

    Even though the infamous “It’s May,” mantra has reared its ugly head, there’s a lot of work getting done.

    “It’s May,” is really the only descriptor needed amongst friends for that four-week period of craziness where you seem to be flying at mock speed, but aren’t really sure what you’re getting done.

    It is a time when on certain days of this month you wonder if anybody keeps house, who does the dishes or when that pile of filing will really get done.

  • There are tricks to every trade including art. Take, for instance, using a grid and carbon paper to create a work of art.

  • Looking back at your childhood, what memories come to mind? Having family picnics at the park? Running through an open field with your friends? Gazing at the sky making shapes out of the clouds? Were you young enough to have attended the Los Alamos Kite Festival?

  • In a show of appreciation to the Retired and Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP) volunteers, a hoe-down was held Friday at the Betty Ehart Senior Center. First Photo: Members of the Los Alamos Mountain Mixers teach some of the RSVP members how to square dance. Second Photo: Square dance caller Mike Holly (left), cools his heels for a little bit along with Marlene Kelley, Tom Kelley, Cal Moss and Susan Krohn. Third Photo: RSVP volunteer Rose Butera enjoys the festivities at the event.

  • The story behind this particular band just does not seem to be the norm. There is something fantastical and out-of-this-world about Igor and the Red Elvises.

    The band made its start as a Russian group playing “Siberian Surf Rock,” according to the band’s Web site.

    The Web site reports that Igor Yuzov, the singer, songwriter and guitarist, grew up in the former Soviet Union, where folk music reigned and rock n’ roll was illegal. Yuzov defied convention and sought out forbidden records.

  • Los Alamos Little Theater made one smart choice with its musical production of “The Spitfire Grill.”  

    For any audience in any town, its message of hope and friendship is just what the doctor ordered. But sitting in the theater Saturday night, I felt the play was prescribed just for Los Alamos.

    Gilead, Wis., is a small town that once strutted strong but now limps along due to the quarry closing. Businesses were boarded up and people left town. In sum, Gilead is in a tight spot. Sound familiar?  

  • Dance Arts Los Alamos (DALA) is proud to present its Spring Showcase at 7 p.m. Saturday at the Duane Smith Auditorium. This year’s spring performance, which is free, will take a slightly different format.  In addition to presenting the achievements of students of many different styles of dance, the performance will also include an abridged version of the ballet “Cinderella.”

  • The Juvenile Justice Advisory Board and Family Strengths Network offers a community education opportunity for Los Alamos at 6:30 p.m. today.

    Dr. Peter Benson, researcher and author, will speak at 6:30 p.m. in UNM-LA’s Lecture Hall.

    Benson will talk to community members about the 40 Developmental Assets and how to ignite sparks of inspiration in people’s lives.

    Benson’s theory of Sparks essentially informs adults on how to help youth find the thing that gives their life meaning.