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Today's Features

  • Summer time is a great chance to build the Assets of Family Communication and Support with a little something called the family vacation. After I write that sentence, in the back of my mind I hear, dun, dun, dun.

    The family vacation, no matter how monotonous, can be memories that last a life time. If they do, as adults, we should try to make them as good as possible.

    Now for those of you who don’t know me very well, I’m as cheap as the day is long, so I certainly don’t mean a trip where we indulge in every purchase the dears would enjoy.

  • From a sponge toss to sack races, the Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints White Rock ward offered fun for all ages July 3 at the church.

     

  • Everyone has felt as though they were stuck in a rut. The routine feels too familiar and perhaps a little flat. Sometimes a change is in order – to shake things up and re-energize people.

    Grace Vineyard Christian Fellowship is following this attitude with two upcoming conferences.

    The first one, which begins today and runs through Sunday, features John Sullivan, Jr., the son of the church’s pastor, Rev. Jack Sullivan. Sullivan, Jr. will be accompanied by his wife, Sofia and Kolynn Hansen.

  • Running, shooting, swimming and horse riding – these are well-established sports but combined altogether, something unique arises.

    A tetrathlon may sound unusual but it is a sport that is widely held.

    Additionally, three girls from Los Alamos recently proved they excel at this sport.

    Madeline Beck, Rachel Brenner and Mariah Bayless of the Los Alamos Pony Club achieved first place as a team in the Rocky Mountain Regional Mega Rally Tetrathlon.

  • For 42 years, the Los Alamos Historical Society has operated the Los Alamos History Museum but as the society turns its attention to the house formerly owned by Dr. J. Robert Oppenheimer, it finds itself in unfamiliar territory.

    Fortunately, the historic society earned a $3,750 grant from the New Mexico Humanities Council as well as a $2,400 grant from the National Trust for Historic Preservation. These grants will offer guidance to the society as it begins initial steps to operate a historic home museum.

  • After the excitement, sturm und drang of Friday night’s season opening, Saturday’s second opening felt more relaxed, less crowded, more casual, less pressured  and the weather was calmer, too.  

    Mozart’s “The Magic Flute” (1791) is the ultimate kid friendly opera, and we did indeed see several beautiful little girls in beautiful little dresses; but I’m sorry to say this production will leave the kids bored instead of dazzled.

  • The Harry Potter books are a gateway not only to magical worlds, but to aspects of the true history of early science and medicine. From botany (herbology) to chemistry (alchemy) to runes and codes (divination), J.K. Rowling based many details in her work on Renaissance scientific and philosophical endeavors. This summer, come explore “Harry Potter’s World”  through a traveling exhibit at Mesa Public Library Art Gallery from the National Libraries of Medicine and the American Library Association. Elizabeth Bland is the curator.

  • The Bradbury Science Museum recently continued its Tuesday summer learning with the topic of bones. The Bradbury is utilizing youth as summer volunteers.

  • 1. You get a new wardrobe

    Unfortunately, most maternity clothes fit awkwardly at best and look more like bedsheets than dresses or shirts. Early in your pregnancy, every outfit you put on sags, practically frowns, over your suddenly formless body.

  • Friday evening marked the beginning of another season at the Santa Fe Opera, with more than 2,000 people mingling in the rose-gold light of another spectacular sunset. Puccini’s “Madame Butterfly,” (1904), which opened the SFO’s first season and theater in 1957, and the subsequent new theaters in 1968 and 1998, now ties with “La Boheme” for most presented Puccini opera at Santa Fe, at least until next year, when “Boheme” inches ahead again.