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Today's Features

  • Tim Martinez, Los Alamos National Laboratory employee giving specialist, and the staff at Self Help, Inc. ran into a problem that many charitable organizations in small towns face. Their intentions to supply children who are in need with new school materials were overlapping and the two entities found each other stepping and stumbling over each other’s toes.

    To avoid the problem this year, Self Help’s Tools for School and LANL’s backpack drive are teaming up to help children get ready for the school year.

  • There has been a lot of negative information in the news lately about celebrities and businesses. Irrelevant of whether the person or business is guilty or innocent or whether you care about the topic or not, as a society we need to stop having so much negativity.

    The truth is that generally happy, healthy people don’t commit crimes. I’m mainly concerned about this because constant negative attention can drive anyone to the dark side.

  • Two community programs are searching for the next pool of leaders for the community of Los Alamos.

    Leadership Los Alamos and the Los Alamos Youth Leadership programs are finalizing the application process for both programs.

    Friday is the final day to submit applications for the 2010/2011 class of Leadership Los Alamos. This class is for community adults looking to expand their horizons about the community or increase their leadership skills.The program is beneficial to anyone already in a leadership position or hoping to broaden the expertise of their staff members.

  • Does what you learn in the classroom really transpire in the real world? Some cynics might scoff at the idea that an art such as poetry could be useful beyond a school’s walls, but two University of New Mexico-Los Alamos professors prove that poetry has a life after the school bell rings.

    Joan Logghe and Jan Lin  teach poetry writing at the local college. Additionally, they have recently earned recognition for their own literary work.

  • For some people, it’s a hobby – a real passion. They set the alarm so they can cruise the streets early to look for the perfect spot and beat the crowds.

    For those who love garage sales, it is not just about getting a certain item but also achieving the perfect price.

    From 10 a.m.-1 p.m. July 24, these bargain hunters will get the deal of a lifetime.

    First Baptist Church is hosting a garage sale where everything from the clothing to furniture is free.

  • Math should not be something to fear. In fact, if approached from the right perspective, the subject can be fun.

    The Los Alamos Branch of American Association of University Women (AAUW), in conjunction with Mesa Public Library Family Night, is showing off this sometimes overlooked side of math during the Let’s Read Math Program at 7 p.m. Monday at Mesa Public Library. The program will present “Grand Father Tang’s Story.”

  • Since he was a boy growing up on the border of Texas and Mexico, Eliseo Torres, known to everyone as ‘Cheo,’ has been fascinated by the folk traditions and ways of Mexico and of his Mexican-American roots.

    Both of his parents were versed in aspects of herbal lore and healing, and as he matured he learned from them a love and respect for the history and folk knowledge of the ancient art of curanderismo, or Mexican folk healing.

  • Author Jacqueline Kelly will sign her 2010 Newberry Honor Book, “The Evolution of Calpurnia Tate,” at 1 p.m. Thursday at Otowi Station. Not only can readers meet with Kelly, but they can share a lunch with her as well. There will be a dutch-treat luncheon at 11:30 a.m. Thursday at the Hill Diner.

  • Like oil and water, black and white, night and day, fine art and folk art seem to have nothing in common. They’re complete opposites.

    Fine art is formal, professional, and feature traditional themes such as landscapes and still life. While folk art is untraditional and democratic – anyone can create a piece of folk art.

  • Los Alamos has the highest number of people with PhDs per capita in the country, many of whom  are inventors and scientists, which is why it’s only logical to host the 3rd annual “Next Big Idea” festival – a festival of discovery, invention and innovation – Saturday with STEM Student Day on Friday.