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Today's Features

  • DALLAS — Adele Costigan, a resident of Los Alamos and a senior at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, is listed on the honor roll with distinction.

    To be listed on the SMU honor roll with distinction, students must be in the top 10 percent of their school of record. SMU’s 2009-2010 enrollment included 11,832 undergraduate students.

  • Editor’s note: Dana Crooks underwent surgery this summer in North Carolina and is recovering. She wrote this story because she wanted to share her experience.

    During the summer, some people go on vacations in paradise or have family reunions to attend. Some people go on road trips across the country. Some get jobs to earn money for college or that new car they want. Others just want to make the best of it and enjoy the break from textbooks and piles of homework.

  • This Friday night we’ll be at the Mari-Mac Shopping Center with Warren Hood and the Marshall Ford Swing Band featuring Emily Gimble. I hope that the weather is something like Wednesday night’s because then the bands will pay us to come here.

    Warren Hood is the fiddler for the Waybacks. Before that, he was the original fiddler for the South Austin Jug Band. Both bands have played great concerts in Los Alamos. He’s all over his violin with all styles of music and has been onstage since he was 4 years old.

  • ESPAÑOLA — Ten years after the Cerro Grande fire damaged it, the Vallecitos de los Caballos Trail (Trail 277) has been re-opened.

    The work was completed earlier this month by a Student Conservation Association (SCA) crew through a Forest Service agreement funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (Recovery Act).

  • Megan Reader, 17, has been selected to represent the United States at the International Tetrathlon Exchange hosted by the USPC Aug. 2-13 in California. The USPC Tetrathlon provides a challenging competition requiring sound, practical horsemanship and general athletic ability. It encourages Pony Club members to broaden their interest in riding, condition their own bodies and become multi-sport athletes.

  • Michele Worley found inspiration close to home for her children’s book, “Buster Goes to the White House.” Her dog Buster was the model for the fictional Buster and the two have a lot in common. Both dogs were adopted from the animal shelter and both are feisty, if small.

    “Buster does all the same things as Buster in the book,” Worley said.

  • The Hot Club of Cowtown returns to the Los Alamos County Summer Concert Series at 7 p.m. Friday at Ashley Pond. This will be their fifth LA appearance. They’re exceptionally good and all ages will love them, unless the only music you dig is classical, rap, heavy metal or hip-hop. Even if that’s the case, you can always have a picnic and just check out the scene. On the hottest summer night, it’s always cool on Fridays at the Pond.

  • When I was a kid, growing older seemed to be the best thing that could ever occur. At some point, however, this attitude changed. I now respond to aging with a mixed bag of emotions.

    Sure, you are given certain privileges such as a driver’s license and entry into R-rated movies, but there seem to be more aches and pains as you grow older.  

    During a recent trip to visit my grandparents in Boca Raton, Fla., I learned the scales shift back and forth between the pros and cons as you progress further and further in life.  

  • The month of August is known as the time to head back to school in Los Alamos.

    This year, the Los Alamos County Council will also recognize the month as Assets Month with an official proclamation during their upcoming meeting.

    The goal of a formal proclamation is to bring attention to the community-wide objective of creating a healthy community for youth where they not only survive but thrive.

    The work is done locally with the help of the Juvenile Justice Advisory Board and the Los Alamos Chamber of Commerce through Assets In Action.

  • Tim Martinez, Los Alamos National Laboratory employee giving specialist, and the staff at Self Help, Inc. ran into a problem that many charitable organizations in small towns face. Their intentions to supply children who are in need with new school materials were overlapping and the two entities found each other stepping and stumbling over each other’s toes.

    To avoid the problem this year, Self Help’s Tools for School and LANL’s backpack drive are teaming up to help children get ready for the school year.