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Today's Features

  • Sometimes it takes a village to make a project come together and with the help of Los Alamos Public Schools staff, yet another project is up and running, or sitting as the case may be.

    Students from the Los Alamos Youth Leadership program have worked together for a few years to raise the funds to donate a bench to Los Alamos High School.

    “It is always great to get a donation that will help support our kids. The LAYL groups do a lot to support the high school and the youth of our community,” Athletic Director Vickie Nelms said.

  • Dance Arts Los Alamos’ 2009 production of “The Nutcracker” gives many dancers an opportunity to shine. A cherished local tradition, this is DALA’s 14th production of the ballet in its 19 years of providing dance training to the community. This year’s presentation is sure to be a sweet treat to audience members. The exquisite sets, splendid costumes and skillful choreography provide a beautiful showcase for both regional and visiting talent.

  • For the third year in a row, White Rock Presbyterian Church will host Sitters for Shoppers from 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Dec. 12 at the church.

    Children ages two through fourth grade will enjoy a variety of activities, crafts, games and videos while under the care of adults from the church. Lunch and snacks will also be provided.

  • The Delancey Street Christmas tree lot is a prefect holiday setting.

    The lot, which is located next to the Knights of Columbus building off Trinity Drive, has candy-cane light poles and Christmas trees in every size. There are racks of wreaths and even snow on the ground.

    The sweetness of the scene goes beyond appearances; there is another aspect beneath the surface that makes this particular Christmas tree lot significant. The proceeds go toward a worthy cause.

  • Education consultant Whitney Laughlin describes colleges today as a perfect storm, which is not a good thing. With universities such as the University of California raising its tuition 32 percent, it is more important than ever to make a wise college selection. Laughlin can show students how to make the best decision.

  • When Rosemary O’Connor looks at the date, Dec. 11, circled on her calendar, it is because that is the date of the Los Alamos Symphony Orchestra’s Christmas Concert at 7 p.m. in the White Rock Baptist Church. She doesn’t think about the fact that it is also her 90th birthday.

  • One of the most significant figures in the history of the Manhattan Project and the development of the U.S. nuclear weapons program may also be one of the least well known.

    According to his biographer, Navy captain William S. “Deak” Parsons “made the atomic bomb happen. As ordnance chief and associate director at Los Alamos, Parsons turned the scientists’ nuclear creation into a practical weapon.

  • “Will you be our Mother Ginger?” Who could possibly refuse such a request? Certainly not Will Rees, Kevin Holsapple or Charlie McMillan, who will each take a turn portraying the colorful, larger-than-life character of Mother Ginger this week in “The Nutcracker.” Dance Arts Los Alamos (DALA) is once again welcoming local community members into the cast of its 14th production of the traditional holiday ballet.

  • My sister had been waiting for this movie for months. She re-read all the books, which the movie is based on, in preparation of the next film installment of the “Twilight” series.

    I myself was eager to see “New Moon.” I’ve not read the books but I had seen previews for the film and read an article about the film’s star, Robert Pattinson. All of this wet my appetite for the movie.

    Even my sister’s husband was eager to see the movie – proving that there is something in the movie for men and women of all ages.  

  • “Your daughter is optimistic – she thinks our child will be president of the United States,” says Sidney Poitier’s character, Dr. John Wade Prentice, in the classic film “Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner.”

    In 1967, the line stood out because of the complete improbability that a child of an interracial marriage would ever be elected president.