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Today's Features

  • The Summer Concert Series continues at 7 p.m. Friday at Ashley Pond with the one of Scotland’s best traditional and neo-traditional bands, Old Blind Dogs.

    I promise it’ll be a tremendous show. They’ll play jigs, reels, love songs and ballads. The Los Angeles Times reported the Old Blind Dogs brings “freshness and color to acoustic music steeped in centuries of Scottish folklore and history.”

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  • Garden party  

    Added up together, there were more than 1,000 garden visits at the recent Los Alamos Gardeners’ Tour. The Garden Tour committee thanks the garden owners, Bev and Martin Cooper, Russell and Marion Pack, Steve Foltyn, the Steve Storms family, Robert and Mary McQuinn, Earl and Linda Hoffman and Pat Walls, for opening their gardens for the day.  

  • There are sights that have become very familiar to the American Cancer Society’s Relay for Life – the purple T-shirts, rows of glowing luminaries and walkers pounding the pavement as early as 1 a.m. But there will be a new sight to behold during this year’s relay.  

    Local celebrities will show off their moves on the dance floor. The event, Dancing with the Stars, will be held during a break at the Los Alamos Summer Concert Series’ show June 25 at Ashley Pond.

  • Laurianne Fiorentino is a renaissance woman. Fiorentino is not only a singer, guitarist and song writer, but she has dabbled in a wide array of other careers, according to her Web site. Fiorentino has been a professional immuno-therapist or allergy technician, potter, graphic-artist-designer/photographer, an Alaskan salmon fisherwoman and a leather-tooling artist.

    That is just the tip of the iceberg; Fiorentino has also worked as a journalist, photographer, painter, tour guide, choir director and an ortho-bionomy healing arts practitioner.

  • The Annual Chili Line Picnic started with just one church – the Trinity on the Hill Episcopal Church – sharing fellowship and barbecue. Now, 15-20 years later, the picnic tables seat members  from several churches. In addition to Trinity on the Hill, St. Jermone’s Espiscopal from Chama and St. Stephen’s in Española participate in the event.

  • If you ever wanted to test the validity of the saying, “when life gives you lemons, make lemonade,” look no further than Christa Brelsford.

    Brelsford, a Los Alamos National Laboratory student employee, traveled to Haiti and helped with Haiti Partners’ adult literacy program in January. She and her brother, Julian, traveled to three different towns including Darbonne, assisting the Christian organization, which focuses on improving education, economic prospects and Haitians’ faith.

  • A singing dog, an awful dog, thugs in the U.S. Customs service and a grandamother busted out of jail are just a few quirky characters that Martha Eagan snares and ropes into her literary work.

    Her most recent book, “La Ranfla and Other New Mexico Stories,”  is described as light-hearted and  reflects the nuttiness in life.

    “La Ranfla” is also the subject of  Eagan’s talk at 7 p.m. Thursday in Mesa Public Library’s upstairs gallery. The discussion is part of the library’s Authors Speak series.

  • Tom Ribe will sign “Inferno by Committee: a History of the Cerro Grande Fire, America’s Worst Prescribed Fire Disaster” from 6-7:30 p.m. Thursday at Otowi Station.

    A decade has passed since the Cerro Grande Fire ushered into America’s psyche the concept of megafires.

    “Inferno by Committee” is written from the perspective of a professional fire manager.

  • If ignored, history will turn to dust. Its lessons will fade and smudge. While it is easy to shrug off the past and merely allow it to turn to ash, but that could be a mistake. Looking to the past can reveal answers to current and future questions.  

    For instance, Tom Ribe, author of “Inferno by Committee,” took an in depth look at the Cerro Grande Fire and discovered a lot of lessons within the fire’s ashes.