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Today's Features

  • Dance

    Scottish country dancing from 7:30-10 p.m. every Monday at Fuller Lodge. Beginners welcome, no partner or kilt needed. call 662-9785 or 661-8317 for more information.
    Music

    Lads of Enchantment, a chapter of the Barbershop Harmony Society, invites the public to join them in song. They meet at 7:15 p.m. on Thursdays at the United Church of Los Alamos, Graves Hall.  

    The Los Alamos Choral Society is recruiting singers. Rehearsals are from 7-9 p.m. Tuesdays at the United Church, 2525 Canyon Road. All singers are welcome.

    The Los Alamos Community Winds invites all interested musicians to join its upcoming concerts. The LACW rehearses from 7-9 p.m. Tuesdays. lacw.org.

  • LOS ANGELES (AP) — Fans are so hungry for “The Hunger Games” that Hollywood’s buzzing about an opening weekend to rival the $140 million debuts of some of the “Twilight” movies.
    Early tracking pegged “The Hunger Games” at only about half that much. But box-office forecasters have been continually revising their predictions upward based on audience awareness and advance ticket sales.
    Opening Friday, “The Hunger Games” has a strong shot at shattering the record March debut of $116.1 million domestically for 2010’s “Alice in Wonderland.” It would be only the second movie opening in March to top $100 million in the first weekend.

  • THIS WEEK ON PAC-8
    Views expressed on programs shown on PAC8 do not necessarily reflect the views of the manager, staff, or board.

    Friday, March 23, 2012
    06:00 AM Democracy Now! – LIVE!
    10:00 AM Democrary Now!
    11:00 AM  County Council Replay (3-20-12)
    03:00 PM Celebration of Aging
    04:00 PM Al Jazeera DC Bureau
    05:00 PM Democracy Now!
    06:00 PM Los Alamos Historical Society-“Los Alamos and the Cold War”
    07:30 PM Spirituality Today
    08:00 PM Clear Heart, Clear Mind
    09:00 PM FSTV

    Saturday, March 24, 2012
    FSTV

    Sunday, March 25, 2012
    06:00 AM FSTV
    05:30 PM Key to the Kingdom

  • The following restaurant inspection reports were provided by the New Mexico Environment Department.

    Santa Fe

    Azur, 428 Agua Fria St.
    Date inspected: March 13
    Violations: Three high-risk violations for poor personal hygiene — hand sink in kitchen was used to store dirty dishes; there were no paper towels in the towel dispenser; and there was no soap available for this hand sink. All high-risk violations were corrected. Two low-risk violations, one for floors/walls/ceilings — the wall across from the undercounter freezer unit is cracked. Seal; some light bulbs in the exhaust hoods are burnt. Replace.

  • Once again, the individuals that make up The Santa Fe Opera Spring Opera Tour are getting ready to take to the highways and byways of New Mexico and Texas.
    The group consisting of Music Director Kirt Pavitt, Soprano Julia Ebner, Tenor Joshua Guerrero and Stage Manager Joel Atella, will load the Santa Fe Opera van with sets and costumes and take off for their month-long adventure and a brand new opera to share.
    Ebner was an apprentice singer in the 2011 season and Guerrero will be a first year apprentice this summer.
     “Avastar,” is an original work written by Pavitt and Stage Director Kathleen Clawson especially for the tour to engage students in the world of opera using contemporary themes.

  • Like most books by Hunter S. Thompson, the “Rum Diary” is not for everyone.
    His gonzo style of journalism probably doesn’t interest the masses and neither do his books.
    In fact, those not interested in journalism and his wild tales probably won’t be interested in his writing.
    Thompson’s style is sometimes hard to follow. It doesn’t always flow the way one would expect. It’s choppy, sometimes convoluted and sometimes strange. But that’s what makes his style so unique.

  • Sometimes it’s ignored. Sometimes people afflicted with it are in denial. Other times, family members are helpless because they have no idea what to do about it, but mental illness isn’t something that will just go away.
    Those who are affected by it need to seek help and those that have family members suffering from it need seek help on their behalf.
    In an effort to spotlight on the subject, a group of people from Los Alamos and the surrounding areas will share their stories with Los Alamos residents at 7 p.m. Saturday at the Duane Smith Auditorium in a series of monologues titled, “Minds Interrupted: Stories of Lives Affected by Mental Illness.” Congressman Ben Ray Luján will introduce the stories.

  • Mesa Public Library’s Authors Speak Series presents a talk on one of the most discussed issues in New Mexico and the Southwest: water and in particular, the Rio Grande. This study by three authors in different fields examines the history of the Rio Grande from many angles.
    G. Emlen Hall and Fred Phillips will present, “Authors of Reining in the Rio Grande: People, Land and Water,” at 7 p.m. Thursday in the upstairs rotunda of Mesa Public Library.
    The study examines human interactions with the Rio Grande from prehistoric time to the present day and explores what possibilities remain for the desert river.

  • Pregnant women get asked many questions as they await their babies: When are you due? Is it a boy or a girl? Have you picked out a name? Have you written a birth plan?
    Or even, sometimes: Who’s the father?
    In “The Snapper,” sort of a 1993 Irish precursor to the 2007 American mega hit “Knocked Up” — in that both comedies star a fetus that does not result from sacred marital love, but rather from booze — 20-year-old Sharon Curley (Tina Kellegher) does not want to answer that last question.

  • The Pajarito Environmental Education Center and the Reel Deal Theater will offer a special showing of “Jane’s Journey,” an award-winning film about Jane Goodall, at 7 p.m. Thursday.
    The film will be $10 for adults and $5 for children. 
     It would be hard to name anyone who has had more of an impact in the realm of animal research and wildlife conservation than Goodall.
    Her pioneering study of wild chimpanzee behavior in Africa continues today, more than 50 years later, under the auspices of her institute.