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Today's Features

  • NEW YORK (AP) — In a move to inject new life into its kookiness, “30 Rock” is going live this week.
    It will be the second such outing for the NBC comedy, which is normally a polished, single-camera filmed affair. It went live for a night in October 2010 with an episode performed during the show’s normal time slot, then re-staged for West Coast viewers.
    The same plan will be followed this Thursday: Originating from NBC’s Studio 8H (fabled home of “Saturday Night Live”), “30 Rock” will air live for viewers in the Eastern and Central time zones at 8:30 p.m. EDT, then be reprised at 8:30 PDT for the rest of the country.

  • NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — It’s not his health but a family feud that is bothering George Jones.
    The 80-year-old country star posted a video message on his website Wednesday, thanking fans as he recovers from an upper respiratory infection. He then accused his daughter Georgette Lennon of spreading lies about him on the Internet.
    He was hospitalized for nearly a week last month and had to postpone shows.

  • The following restaurant inspection reports were provided by the New Mexico Environment Department.

    Santa Fe

    Burrito Spot, 2207 Cerrillos Road
    Date inspected: April 20

  • Dance
    Scottish country dancing from 7:30-10 p.m. every Monday at Fuller Lodge. Beginners welcome, no partner or kilt needed. call 662-9785 or 661-8317 for more information.
    Music
    Lads of Enchantment, a chapter of the Barbershop Harmony Society, invites the public to join them in song. They meet at 7:15 p.m. on Thursdays at the United Church of Los Alamos, Graves Hall.  

    The Los Alamos Choral Society is recruiting singers. Rehearsals are from 7-9 p.m. Tuesdays at the United Church, 2525 Canyon Road. All singers are welcome.

    The Los Alamos Community Winds invites all interested musicians to join its upcoming concerts. The LACW rehearses from 7-9 p.m. Tuesdays. lacw.org.

  • First poetry slam in Jemez Springs

    Jemez Springs will host a poetry slam at 2 p.m. Sunday at the Presbyterian Church on Hwy. 4. The Friends of the Jemez Springs Library is sponsoring the event. This is a first for the village. Cleveland High School teacher Katrina Guariscio will kick off the evening. Admission is free.

  • Kiwanis, a global volunteer organization — and Key Cub International, its younger counterpart — have joined forces with UNICEF to eliminate maternal and neonatal tetanus.
    In an effort to help spread awareness and raise money for the vaccines, syringes, safe storage, transportation and time of skilled staff members, Los Alamos High School Key Club Secretary, Katelyn Littleton, has dedicated much of her senior year to this cause called, “Project Eliminate.”
    The elimination of maternal and neonatal tetanus is being done through the administration of a vaccine that protects a mother and all her children from the deadly disease, which affects roughly 60,000 babies every year, due to unsanitary birthing practices.

  • The years between 1905 and 1917 were difficult for Jews in Russia. The pre-revolutionary years witnessed a persecution of the Chosen People not known to Europe since the Spanish Inquisition.
    Jews were blamed for the assassination of Czar Alexander II in 1881 and became scapegoats for the growing revolutionary sentiment in Russia. They were subjected to humiliating taxes, anti-Semitic laws and state-sponsored terror.
    In the 40 years leading up to the 1917 Bolshevik revolution, nearly three million Jews were forced out of their homes to leave Russia.

  • This week, the library will screen writer/director Kar Wei Wong’s “Chungking Express,” a '90s movie that feels like a 90s movie. Having “come of age” in the 90s, I mean that as a compliment.
    I like flannel shirts mixed with impressionistic psychotic love. And, it turns out — no offense to my Seattle-born (go figure) Anglo husband — I sometimes like Chinese men.
    This is a great movie, but to be honest, it took me a long time to realize it. I was well into the film before I started to understand and care about its very messed up characters.
    In some cases, it was easy, such as with the aforementioned Chinese men, by which I actually mean man, or much more specifically, Cop 663, played by Tony Liung Chiu Wai.

  • April is a special month in the literary and library worlds, honoring both poetry (National Poetry Month)  and libraries (National Library Week was April 8-14). In recognition of the role libraries play in providing free and open access to information, the Mesa Public Library Authors Speak Series presents a book on challenges to what is included in library collections at 7 p.m. Thursday in the upstairs rotunda.
    “True Stories of Censorship Battles in America’s Libraries” is a compilation of essays edited by librarians Valerie Nye and Kathy Barco, who have experienced challenges to remove material held in their own libraries’collections.

  • At 7 p.m. May 2 PEEC will present a talk on birds of Australia. Marion and Ramie Stelts will show their photographs and discuss these diverse and exotic birds.  The talk is free and open to the public. The Steltses have made six trips to Australia in the last 10 years and have fallen in love with Australian birds. This illustrated talk will discuss birds they have encountered in their travels, including many parrots, raptors, honeyeaters, flycatchers, bowerbirds and others.   For more information, PajaritoEEC.org, call 662-0460, or email Programs@PajaritoEEC.org.