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Today's Features

  • Piñon Panther alumni Dallin Stokes has almost completed his Eagle Scout project for Piñon Elementary School. The Los Alamos High School junior worked on behalf of Scout Troop 422. Stokes is quick to praise community members for their  assistance with the project including Lynne Compton at Metzgers who helped to acquire the paint; Piñon personnel; his mother; dedicated mentor and guide Garth Tietjen.
    “Dallin is a wonderful example of a proud Piñon alumnus who is giving back,” said Piñon Principal Jill Gonzales. “Dallin took careful measurements, created scale drawings and meticulously painted each of the 48 contiguous states in a variety of colors — the final product of which looks absolutely wonderful!”
    Stokes hopes to receive a degree in history education at Brigham Young
    University in the future and teach high school or college history.

  • Next week, we begin to focus on an asset of the week, to ensure another year of relationship building.
    This year, I feel like we need a slogan. I won’t give up the ones we already use which are, “Healthy Community, Healthy Youth,” or “Take A Second, Make A Difference.”
    Sometimes I feel like we need something to rally the troops, something to ignite the little fire that makes you want to get something done.
    When we think of asset building, we need to be intentional in our efforts.
    It doesn’t matter if it is eye contact in passing, a friendly nod or an actual conversation, just be aware.
    This is the chance to give students a second chance and help them get on the good path.
    This charge if you will, extends to parents, caregivers, coaches, teachers, staff, neighbors and anyone that associates with kids.
    The work I do isn’t just for those that are in school, it is for anyone interested in building a better community.
    I do tend to focus a lot of working with the schools, but mainly because they are a captive audience.
    I can also work with scouts, church youth groups or whatever adults are open to sharing a few minutes to see how they can do better.

  • Pajarito Environmental Education Center is offering two new clubs for kids in grades kindergarten through third: “Nature Detectives” for grade K-1, and “Outdoor Explorers” for grades 2-3. The clubs will begin Sept. 4 and run every Tuesday from 3:45-5:15 p.m., through Nov. 27. Angelique Harshman and Beth Cortright will teach the clubs.
    PEEC’s Nature Clubs are a way to help children connect with the outdoors. Members will investigate local animals and plants and connect with the wild side of the Pajarito Plateau through a variety of activities. Because the clubs are targeted to just two grade levels each, activities will be more age-appropriate than before. Club members hike in the canyon, do science experiments and get in-depth with nature.
    Harshman is an environmental educator with more than 15 years of experience working with kids from preschool to high school age. Cortright is a biologist with a specialty in entomology and has worked with many PEEC programs, including field trips and summer camps.  

  • Elke Duerr of the Web of Life Foundation comes to Pajarito Environmental Education Center at 6:30 p.m. Thursday for an interactive presentation about wolves in the Southwest.
    This presentation will be suitable for all ages and will include hands-on activities and documentary film footage.  The talk is free and open to the public.
    Duerr will provide facts about wolves in the state and hands-on experiences from her “wolf trunk.” The audience will be able to see wolf tracks and fur and learn about how researchers radio collar a wolf to track its movements. Participants will be able to howl with wolves on tape and listen to stories of wolf encounters.  
    Duerr will also show footage and stills from her film work about the Mexican Gray Wolves. She will discuss humans’ relationship to the wolf and why we want wolves to remain a part of the wilderness and cultural heritage.
    The Web Of Life Foundation is dedicated to a healthy coexistence between wilderness and civilization, the reconnection of humans to the natural world and the recovery of endangered plant and animal species.
    Come to PEEC to learn about the importance of wolves in the ecosystem. For more information, visit PajaritoEEC.org, call 662-0460, or email Programs@PajaritoEEC.org.

  • In honor of National Farmers’ Market Week 2012 (Aug. 5 -11), the New Mexico Farmers’ Marketing Association announces the New Mexico Farmers’ Market Story Awards, designed to reward and showcase the variety of ways farmers’ markets benefit communities across New Mexico. 
    The NMFMA is looking for essay and/or video submissions from both farmers/producers and customers from all corners of the state that depict concrete examples of farmers’ market impacts.
    Contest entries should answer the question: “How has selling or shopping at a farmers’ market affected you, your farm, your family or your community?
    Submissions might address topics such as: on-farm biodiversity, responsible agricultural production, sustaining family farms (or backyard growers), rural job opportunities, helping your family eat more fruits and vegetables, learning about where your food comes from, or getting to know your community better.
    Prizes will include one grand prize ($250); Best Farmer/Producer Video ($100); Best Farmer/Producer Essay ($100); Best Customer Video ($100 market bucks); Best Customer Essay ($100 market bucks). Honorable mentions will also be awarded.
    Submissions should include essays and/or videos written by or featuring farmers/producers as well as market customers. Submit entries by Sept. 5.

  • The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of on site adoptable pets waiting for their forever home.
    Come find a companion that will give you unconditional love. Be sure to visit lafos.org, where you can get more information about volunteering, adopting and donating.
    All adoptable pets are spayed or neutered, have their shots and are micro chipped. Visitor guides: Between 4-6 p.m. Friday, volunteers will be at the shelter to give potential adopters personal introductions to the adoptable animals.

    DOGS
    Coqueta — Six-year-old spayed female Retriever/Chow-mix surrendered. Good with adults and gentle children. Has been an outdoor dog.
    Naney — Senior brown-and-white English Hound-mix. Owner going abroad. Needs a quiet retirement home. Has reasonable doggy manners. Would be a nice, calm companion in a quiet home.  Will have some tumors removed and a good dental next week.
    Phoebe — Young, black female Spaniel-mix. temperament testing shows no aggression or guarding issues. Enjoys being around people. Her choice is not to share her new home with another dog or cat.
    Seren — Shepherd-mix, still very nervous without her owner, who had to move away for a job. Bonds strongly with a single owner.

  • Registration for the next session of dog training classes offered by the  Los Alamos Dog Obedience Club will begin Sept 4. Classes this session include Puppy Kindergarten, Basic Manners, Beginning Agility, Beginning Rally, Recall, Competitive Obedience, Conformation and the parRENT Free Club (for kids) and will begin the week of Sept 24.
    Class schedule, registration guidelines and registration form will be available on the LADOC website at ladoc.dogbits.com and at the LADOC building, 246 East Road. Registration is first-come, first-served, so timely registration is advised.
    Registration materials must be postmarked by Sept 14.

     

  • Aug. 26-Sept. 1
    For information, call the Betty Ehart Senior Center (BESC) at 662-8920, the White Rock Senior Center (WRSC) at 662-8200 and “Day Out” (adult day care, 8 a.m.-4 p.m.) at 661-0081. Reservations must be made by 10 a.m. for daily lunches.

    Betty Ehart
    MONDAY
    8:45 a.m.    Cardio
    9 a.m.    Toenail clipping
    11:30 a.m.    Lunch: Pork chop
    7 p.m.        Ballroom dancing

    TUESDAY
    8:45 a.m.    Variety training
    10 a.m.    No low vision/hearing
    11:30 a.m.    Lunch: Chef salad
    7 p.m.        Bridge
    7:30 p.m.    Table tennis

    WEDNESDAY
    8:30 a.m.    RSVP quilters
    8:45 a.m.    Cardio plus exercise
    10:45 a.m.    Music with Ruth
    11:30 a.m.    Lunch: Oven baked chicken
    Noon        Paula Sanchez    
    1:15 p.m.    Socrates Café
    1:30 p.m.    Daytime duplicate bridge
    1:30 p.m.    Tire pressure check

    THURSDAY

  • Los Alamos Medical Center reported the following births:

    • Aug. 1: A boy, Grady William Nackers, Christina and William Nackers  

    • Aug. 2: A girl, Hazel Bryn Torres, born to Kaylee and Aaron Torres

    • Aug. 4: A girl, Charlotte Sofia Moro, born to Lauren and Erik Moro

    • Aug. 7: A boy, Gabriel Vincent Elca, born to Divina Anunciado and Aridel Elca

    • Aug. 7: A girl, Emily Q. Huang, born to Wenjing Oiu and Chen Huang

    • Aug. 8: A boy, Elijah Ben Arellano, born to Faith Martinez and Jerome Arellano

    • Aug. 9: A girl, Joslynn Marie Romero, born to Alicia Herrera and Eric Romero

    • Aug. 10: A boy, Lucius Kang, born to Ni Ni and Zhongbo Kang

    • Aug. 13: A girl, Mia Bella Sandoval, born to Brittany and Frank Sandoval

    • Aug. 14: A girl, Jazmine Lynette Martinez, born to Cassandra Jordan and Juan Martinez


  • CINCINNATI (AP) — Neil Armstrong was a quiet self-described nerdy engineer who became a global hero when as a steely-nerved pilot he made "one giant leap for mankind" with a small step on to the moon. The modest man who had people on Earth entranced and awed from almost a quarter million miles away has died. He was 82.

    Armstrong died following complications resulting from cardiovascular procedures, his family said in a statement Saturday. It didn't say where he died.

    Armstrong commanded the Apollo 11 spacecraft that landed on the moon July 20, 1969, capping the most daring of the 20th century's scientific expeditions. His first words after setting foot on the surface are etched in history books and the memories of those who heard them in a live broadcast.

    "That's one small step for (a) man, one giant leap for mankind," Armstrong said.