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Today's Features

  • Group auditions for Van Choc Straw will be at 7:30 p.m. Nov. 4 and 5 in the Green Room of the Performing Arts Center, 1670 Nectar St.
    Scripts are available at the Reference Desk of the Mesa Public Library.
    Anyone who wishes to have a private audition rather than attend the group audition should contact John Gustafson at johngus@cybermesa.com or at 412-3235.
    Callbacks, if necessary, will be at 7:30 p.m. Nov. 6.
    “VanChocStraw” (think Neopolitan ice cream), an unpublished play by Albuquerque-based playwright Mark Dunn, will be produced at Los Alamos Little Theatre in March 2013, and will be LALT’s entry into the AACTFest competition to be hosted at LALT, also in March.
    Mimi Adams is the director and Gustafson the producer. Anyone interested in helping with crew for this show is also invited to let them know of your interest. Casting will be for four women and one man.
    Characters in order of appearance
    • Althea Witlin, female, mid- to late-70s
    • Leif Morrell, male, 33
    • Mattie Pleshette, female, mid-20s to early 30s
    • Connie Morrell, female, 31
    • Ina Gluck, female, mid-70s
    This is a comedy/drama. Althea Witlin has one jigsaw puzzle among her large collection that she’s never worked.

  • The 35th Annual Fall Arts and Crafts Fair presented by the Fuller Lodge Art Center Saturday, offers a “Gateway to the Holidays” shopping experience with a showcase of artists and craftspeople. The show features more than 60 artists representing 22 communities and three states.
    The artists present a wide selection of contemporary arts and crafts, ranging from functional to decorative. Both two- and three-dimensional works will be featured including ceramics, fabric and fiber, glass, jewelry, metal, wood, painting and photography. 
    This year, the Art Center is holding the fair at the Crossroads Bible Church, 97 East Road. This venue will hold enough artists for variety, while still maintaining an intimate shopping experience. To help celebrate the new location, there will be a number of door prizes. Anyone who visits may enter the drawing. Pick up a ticket at the front door, go to the stage and punch a hole in the ticket, then drop it in the “draw” box on the way out. This will help the Art Center get a count of attendees and encourage visitors to wander through the whole fair, hopefully looking at many of the works displayed.

  • The Lads of Enchantment will present their Annual Barbershop Harmony Show Oct. 26 and 27 at the United Church of Los Alamos.
    This year’s show, “After Dark,” will feature the Lads of Enchantment Chorus and quartets and the Lads’ special guest, The 505 Chorus, Albuquerque’s young men’s a cappella group.
    “After Dark” takes a light-hearted look at the misadventures of Dr. Frankenstein as he attempts to brighten his existence using his form of creativity.
    The foibles of Frankenstein and his assistants establish the premise for the Lads to sing traditional barbershop songs and favorites such as “Blue Moon,” “By the Light of the Silvery Moon,” “I’m Sitting on Top of the World,” Blue Velvet” and “Moonlight Bay.”
    Since the show is the weekend before Halloween, the audience is encouraged, but not required, to wear a costume and participate in a costume contest each night of the show.
    The 505 Chorus brings the energy and enthusiasm of youth and a blended sound to the show.  The 505 Chorus was founded in 2008 by four young men who wanted to compete in collegiate a cappella choral singing, which has undergone resurgence in recent years.  

  • Get a taste of India and travel down the rabbit hole with “Alice in Indian Wonderland,” from 4-6 p.m. Sunday at the Duane Smith Auditorium.
    For the eighth year, Kavita Nandakishore and Alina Deshpande will present the “Dances of India” fundraiser. This year, it will benefit Bharat Vidyalaya, a school for children living below the poverty line in Wai, Maharashtra, India.
    Nandakishore and Deshpande teach Kathak and Bharatnatyam dance classes at the Y. Deshpande teaches Kathak, an East Indian classical dance that involves combinations of hand and foot movements set to a combination of beats, while Nandakishore teaches Bharatnatyam, a classical dance from South India that combines postures, drama, expression and rhythm in an attempt to “embody the divine beauty, charm, rhythms and symbols that exist in heaven as a means of spiritual elevation,” according to the Y’s website.

  • Today
    GeekOut Family Night will be from 5:30-8:30 p.m. upstairs, at Mesa Public Library. Bring your own games, or play theirs.

    This month’s Juvenile Justice Advisory Board meeting will be at 6:15 p.m. in Building #1, Camino Entrada, Pajarito Cliffs Site. The public is welcome to attend. For more information, call 661-4097.
    Thursday
    The Los Alamos Farmers Market will be from 7 a.m.-12:30 p.m. in the Mesa Public Library parking lot. There are two Thursdays left for the outdoor market season.

    Tom Ribe, a native of Los Alamos and an expert on natural resource issues relating to the Four Corners area will present, “21st Century Science Powered by 19th Century Power Plants,” at 6 p.m. at UNM-LA building 2, room 230. The talk is sponsored by the Los Alamos County Environmental Sustainability Board and the Los Alamos Sustainable Energy Network. Attendees are encouraged to attend the Los Alamos County Environmental Sustainability Board meeting at 5:30 p.m. The talk will follow that meeting.

    Join the Parent Raising Teen Club from 6-7:30 p.m. at the Unitarian Church, 1738 N. Sage Loop. Share your worries and find like-minded parents that can offer support. The group will meet each Thursday evening through Nov. 29. For more information, call Elizabeth Grant at 660-5796.

  • A small “barn-raising” will be held 4-6 p.m. Oct. 23 at the Los Alamos Cooperative Market, 95 Entrada Dr., in conjunction with a national State Farm Youth Advisory Board grant award presentation.
    Youth and adult volunteers are welcome to assist with the construction and decoration of a small hoop house at the Co-op, which is a partnering satellite location for the funded community garden project.
    The State Farm Youth Advisory Board awarded a $96,250 grant to the Los Alamos Juvenile Justice Advisory Board in support of an educational and outreach community garden.
    The JJAB has contracted The Family YMCA to deliver the grant’s education and food-assistance objectives throughout the next year.
    This is the second award by the State Farm Youth Advisory Board to the JJAB for their Los Alamos Youth Food Project. The funding has provided seed money in order to mobilize middle and high school youth in support of sustainable healthy eating.
    Youth and adult volunteers can paint and decorate the hoop-house from 4-6 p.m. Oct. 23. The hoop house will be used for winter planting and spring seedling starters. State Farm representatives will also present a commemorative check to JJAB officials at 4:30 p.m.

  • Janali Gustafson, a senior at Los Alamos High School was recently honored as Rotary Student of the Month for September. Gustafson is the daughter of Sarah and John Gustafson and the sister of Elena and Nathaniel.
    The Rotary Club of Los Alamos selects one student each month of the school year to honor as a Student of the Month. In addition to high school seniors, high school juniors are now eligible for the recognition. Students are nominated by their teachers and chosen on the basis of their academic achievement, extracurricular activities and in particular, their service to the community.
    Community service has been an important part of Gustafson’s four years at LAHS.  Since her freshman year, she has been a member of Los Alamos Youth Leadership.
    With her interest in establishing positive relationships between elementary school students and high school students, she organized Wild Day, a Saturday of recreational activities for elementary school students and also LAYL’s largest community service project.
    Through the high school’s Environmental Club, Gustafson has also helped coordinate projects designed to motivate the community to adopt a greener lifestyle.  

  • Today
    The next meeting of the Los Alamos Geological Society will begin at 7:30 p.m. at the Christian Church, 92 East Road. The featured speaker will be Dan Aiken. The October field trip will be to San Pedro Mines. For this trip, they will meet at 7 a.m. Oct. 20 at Sullivan Field. For more information, contact Paul Bradley at Ppbradpp@aol.com.

    Rebecca Oertel, a Forest and Range Plant ecologist will present the effects of the Las Conchas Fire on the VCNP and surrounding Jemez Mountains. She will discuss the ecological consequences of this fire as well as the recovery that is underway. From 7-8 p.m. Free. No registration required.
    Wednesday
    GeekOut Family Night will be from 5:30-8:30 p.m. upstairs, at Mesa Public Library. Bring your own games, or play theirs.

    This month’s Juvenile Justice Advisory Board meeting will be at 6:15 p.m. in Building #1, Camino Entrada, Pajarito Cliffs Site. The public is welcome to attend. For more information, call 661-4097.
    Thursday
    The Los Alamos Farmers Market will be from 7 a.m.-12:30 p.m. in the Mesa Public Library parking lot. There are two Thursdays left for the outdoor market season.

  • Today we focus on improving school climate and I will spend the day with the Aspen Tiger sixth graders, presenting the Change of Heart program.
    I believe that one of the most important things we need to do is to make every school a safe place to learn.
    We present this program at every elementary school and at Los Alamos Middle School for all new students to the district.
    Often, the stories shared by students who come from other schools, is astonishing.
    Just yesterday at Cookies and Conversation, one young man spoke of life at school before coming to the Los Alamos Public Schools District.
    The fact that the classrooms are calm, the teachers are engaged and students don’t rule should be a standard, but I’m confused why the whole country doesn’t have the same standard.
    As families, we should teach our kids to be nice, tolerate others, do unto others — or just ignore someone they don’t get along with at school.
    I assume the hard part is that not everyone comes from the same home, doesn’t have parents that support differences, doesn’t think you should love your neighbor as you love yourself, or maybe even to love yourself in the first place.
    We expect the schools to be able to accomplish the goals we don’t set forth in our own homes.

  • The annual Los Alamos County Science Fair will take place Jan. 26, 2013 in the Los Alamos High School Commons Areas. The public is invited to view the projects between 1-3 p.m.
    LAPS and home school students in grades four through 12 will display projects in fourth and fifth grade individual elementary, K-sixth grade elementary class, six through eighth grade junior division and nine through 12th grade senior division.
    The elementary projects are divided into three categories.
    The students in junior and senior divisions will compete for first, second and third place and honorable mention in 17 categories. This will give them an opportunity to participate in the Northeastern New Mexico Regional Science and Engineering Fair in Las Vegas, N.M. March 3, 2013.
    Every student will receive feedback from the judges, which will assess the student’s scientific approach, skills, creativity, clarity and thoroughness. Therefore, the participation in the County Science Fair is experience for student learning.
    Participation at the science fair helps the students to achieve State Standard I for every student in every grade level. This standard requires students to understand the processes of scientific investigations and use inquiry and scientific ways of observing, experimenting, predicting and validating to think critically.