.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's Features

  • “The Descendants,” screening Thursday at Mesa Public Library, is the kind of film that smart people wish would win awards. 

    It’s not sensationalistic or gratuitous. It’s not one easy laugh after another, one car chase after another, one famous person after another saying dumb, obvious things with their multi-million-dollar voices. 

    And in fact, the film did win an Oscar for Best Writing, Adapted Screenplay and was nominated for four others: Best Achievement in Directing (Alexander Payne); Best Achievement in Film Editing (Kevin Tent); Best Motion Picture; and Best Actor (George Clooney). 

  • The  Los Alamos High School Homecoming Parade is slated for Sept. 21. 

    Staging begins at 2 p.m. on 4th Street and Central Avenue, at the Canyon School parking lot. The parade send-off will begin at 3 p.m. Walkers should stage on the west side of the Canyon School parking lot, while floats/trailers should only stage on the east side of the parking lot. This arrangement is different from last year.

    The parade will step off at the intersection of 4th Street and Central Avenue at 3 p.m. Parade participants should arrive no later than 2:30 p.m. The parade will head down Central Avenue, past the judges’ stand in front of Starbucks, finishing on Rose Street. 

    Walking participants will be directed to the United Church parking lot, while driving participants must drive to the Griffith or Mesa parking lot before unloading their participants. 

  • Today
    Mesa Public Library presents Game Night from 5:30-8:30 p.m. Bring your games or play theirs. For all ages.
     
    Monica Witt, Utilities and Institutional Facilities Energy manager at LANL will give a talk at 7 p.m. in upstairs meeting rooms 2 and 3 at Mesa Public Library. Witt has worked at LANL for 10 years in the environmental and energy management fields. She is responsible for implementing projects to reduce energy and water to meet the lab’s sustainability goals. She will discuss the federal sustainability requirements and what LANL is working on to meet energy, water and greenhouse gas reduction goals. The program is co-sponsored by the Sierra Club and the Los Alamos Sustainability Network.

    Thursday
    The Los Alamos Farmers Market will be from 7 a.m.-12:30 p.m. in the parking lot of Mesa Public Library.

    The Mesa Public Library Free Film Series presents “The Descendants,” (R), at 6:30 p.m.

    Bird Banding Talk at PEEC by local birder Dave Yeamans. Learn how scientists use banding methods to track and study birds around the world. See photos, hear stories and watch movies of ornithologists at work. 7 p.m. Free. No registration required. Visit PajaritoEEC.org, call 662-0460, or email Programs@PajaritoEEC.org for more information.

    Friday

  • Douglas and Ruth Helmick Lier

    Doug and Ruth Lier are both of Scandinavian descent and perhaps that partially explains how they fit together so well. Doug notes his heritage is Norwegian and Danish, and Ruth descends from “Viking kings.” Maybe that bond also fires the apparently boundless energy and interests they share and pour into the community — much to the betterment of Los Alamos for the past 60 years.
    Green Bay, Wis. was home to Doug until he left to attend St. Olaf College in Northfield, Minn., where he earned his bachelor’s degree in physics.  Following graduation, he joined the Navy’s Officer Candidate School. Due to his background in physics and math, Doug was sent to Sandia Base in Albuquerque for training as a nuclear supervisor. He served out the remainder of the Korean War in the far East as a nuclear supervisor aboard Navy carriers.
    He later joined the Los Alamos Laboratory as a joint task force member, then as a lab staff member in J and P divisions, and ended his 36-year lab career in the directors’ office.
    Ruth Helmick Lier grew up in Des Moines, Iowa and at 22, was happily completing her master’s degree in microbiology when she learned the Los Alamos school system was seeking a science teacher.

  • PASADENA, Calif. (AP) — Thirty-five years after leaving Earth, Voyager 1 is reaching for the stars.

    Sooner or later, the workhorse spacecraft will bid adieu to the solar system and enter a new realm of space — the first time a manmade object will have escaped to the other side.

    Perhaps no one on Earth will relish the moment more than 76-year-old Ed Stone, who has toiled on the project from the start.

    "We're anxious to get outside and find what's out there," he said.

    When NASA's Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 first rocketed out of Earth's grip in 1977, no one knew how long they would live. Now, they are the longest-operating spacecraft in history and the most distant, at billions of miles from Earth but in different directions.

    Wednesday marks the 35th anniversary of Voyager 1's launch to Jupiter and Saturn. It is now flitting around the fringes of the solar system, which is enveloped in a giant plasma bubble. This hot and turbulent area is created by a stream of charged particles from the sun.

    Outside the bubble is a new frontier in the Milky Way — the space between stars. Once it plows through, scientists expect a calmer environment by comparison.

  • LOS ANGELES (AP) — Michael Clarke Duncan, the hulking, prolific character actor whose dozens of films included an Oscar-nominated performance as a death row inmate in "The Green Mile" and such other box office hits as "Armageddon," ''Planet of the Apes" and "Kung Fu Panda," is dead at age 54.

    Clarke died Monday morning at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, where he was being treated for a heart attack, said his fiancée, reality TV personality Rev. Omarosa Manigault, in a statement released by publicist Joy Fehily.

    The muscular, 6-foot-4 (1.96 meter) Duncan, a former bodyguard who turned to acting in his 30s, "suffered a myocardial infarction on July 13 and never fully recovered," the statement said. "Manigault is grateful for all of your prayers and asks for privacy at this time. Celebrations of his life, both private and public, will be announced at a later date."

  • Register middle school or high school students for STEM Student Day from 4-7 p.m. Sept. 14.
    Everyone starts off at the Little Theater at 4 p.m. with a character performance of Madame Curie. Then at 5 p.m., walk over to the Bradbury Science Museum and have pizza and attend a program of the students’ choice (required at time of registration). Students choose from: Kraz-E-Science show; Mars-Rover program; or Fire Science program. All programs are limited in size. There will also be an iPad giveaway followed by seeing a domonstration of the Procter & Gamble Corvette with jet engine in the parking lot across the street.
    Register at chamberorganizer.com/members/evr/reg_event.
    The last Los Alamos County Summer Concer Series event of the season will be at 7 p.m. at Ashley Pond, featuring Stephanie Hatfield.
    From 11 a.m.-3 p.m.  Sept. 15, The Next Big Idea Festival will be at Fuller Lodge. There will be entertainment planned and food. Kids of all ages, as well as other venues about town such as the Bradbury Science Museum, Recycled Fashion Show down MainStreet, Mesa Pubic Library and parking lot and Central Park Square’s Beer garden at The Park or green area. Go to nextbigideala.com for more information.