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Today's Features

  •  Baha’i Faith
    For information, email losalamosla@gmail.com. For general information, call the Baha’i Faith phone at 1-800-228-6483.

    Bethlehem Lutheran
    Bethlehem Evangelical Lutheran Church, a member of the ELCA is located at 2390 North Road, 662-5151; see a map at bethluth.com. Worship services are at 8:15 a.m. and 11 a.m., at 9:45 a.m. we have classes for every age — new to 90+ with coffee and doughnuts served in the Gathering Space for The preaching is biblical by our Pastors Bruce Kuenzel and Nicolé Ferry, the music is lively, children are welcome and abundant, and a well-staffed nursery is provided. All are welcome! Come Join the Family!

    Bryce Ave. Presbyterian
    The church is located at 3333 Bryce Ave. The Rev. Henry Fernandez preaches, bapca.org, info@bapca.org. For information, call 672-3364.

    Buddhist
    Kannon Zendo, 35 Barranca Road. kannonzendo.org. Henry Chigen Finney, 661-6874. Meditation in the Zen tradition will be offered Wednesday evenings at the Kannon Zendo in Los Alamos.

    Calvary Chapel
    Sunday school classes for all ages at 9:15 a.m. At 10:30 a.m., worship and a study of the Biblical Jesus as He relates to people in our look at the Gospel of Exodus.

  • The Los Alamos Jewish Center will have its community Passover Seder that open to anyone interested in attending. The event will be 5:30 p.m. April 15 at the Betty Ehart Senior Center.
    The Seder is a ceremonial dinner filled with rituals designed to celebrate the Jewish people’s exodus from Egypt. The Seder, which is Hebrew for “order,” ushers in the week of Pesach in which Jews refrain from eating Chametz.
    The celebration of Passover commemorates the miraculous delivery of the Jews from years of slavery, ultimately culminating in the birth of the Torah, the Five Books of Moses, at Mount Sinai.
    Thus, for Jews all over the world, this annual time of renewal is a time to look at themselves and society through the lens of the slave once again. It is a time to let go of all prejudice, intolerance, closed mindedness and limited thinking. It is a time for renewed inspiration to help create a world that is free for all peoples and all religions.
    This year Rabbi Stephen Landau will lead the Community Seder as a fun evening of ritual dedicated to the memory of the Exodus from Mitzrayim, or Egypt and the importance of freedom and respect for everyone.

  • The Los Alamos Visiting Nurse Service Hospice is looking for people interested in assisting with the hospice program.
    Training will include diversity, confidentiality, psycho/social needs, family dynamics and meeting the needs of the individual patient.
    Orientation meeting will be noon to 1:30 p.m. May 7 at Los Alamos Visiting Nurse Service Office, 2202 Canyon Road.
    To reserve a space, call Visiting Nurses at 662-2525.  

  • Today
    The Los Alamos Republican Women will host a 2014 Republican Candidates Meet and Greet. 7 p.m. 1615 Central Avenue, Suite 100 (Downstairs from Pro2Serve & beside Metzer’s). All political persuasions are invited to come and meet the Republican candidates. State and local candidates will briefly speak and then attendees will have opportunity to personally meet and ask them questions. For more information, contact Donna MacDonald, 662-4001.

    The April meeting of the Los Alamos Master Gardeners will be 7 p.m. in the Nambé Room of Fuller Lodge. The speaker will be Rosemarie Frederickson and her topic, “Backyard Beekeeping.”

    The Mesa Public Library Film Series. “Ruby Sparks” 6:30 p.m. in the upstairs meeting room.

    “Sisters in Art — Sisters at Heart,” shows daily in the Portal Gallery of Fuller Lodge Art Center through April 26.
    Friday
    Bag Days. 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Jemez House Thrift Shop, 13 Sherwood Blvd.

  • The Hilltop Garden now has an official logo, which was designed by local resident Cayla Aikin.
    While Los Alamos County has issued a Request for Proposal and the Family YMCA has been awarded it, the county must still obtain federal permission for the specific land use.
    According to a press release, Los Alamos County is working with the Family YMCA to move this along as quickly as possible, but it will likely mean that using the land will be delayed for more months than originally thought.
    In the interim, the Y is pursuing plans for developing the space, as well as hosting an alternate site for this summer.
    The community is now free to help dream up ideas for the new garden.  Post any ideas to the Family YMCA Facebook page titled “The Family Y-Hilltop Garden”
    at facebook.com/HilltopGarden
    LosAlamos.
    The Y is currently considering about the kind of shade structure that would be ideal for Hilltop Garden.  

  • When Melissa Schmidt and her Aunt Brenda Kelley knew a change was needed, they created an opportunity for community discussion through a Facebook page called HOLLA, Hope and Love in Los Alamos, one they hope to see grow into a real force of encouragement in the community.
    The idea was born after becoming interested in a website that offers similar goals to what HOLLA hopes to do in Los Alamos and that is to offer hope and help. To Write Love on Her Arms, twloha.com, works to offer hope and help, while addressing the stigma of mental health issues.
    Born in Los Alamos in 1982, Schmidt went on to live in the big world, experiencing the heartaches of life, that many teens are forced to deal with.
    These struggles included the divorce of her parents and confronting issues of sexuality, which led to her dropping out of high school, her senior year.
    “Seriously, guys, stay in school, dropping out in January of your senior year is dumb, trust me,” Schmidt said and returned to get her diploma in 2003. “Now I see that my parents’ divorce was probably the best thing for me and my sisters, and being gay isn’t something I chose, and it is not something I am ashamed of.”

  • Doug Scott has been exploring and writing about the waterfalls of New Mexico for decades. Of special interest is that a new 80-foot high waterfall is being formed this year, for which Scott is documenting the formation and the fact that it will continue to grow for years to come. Scott will share photos and observations of these waterfalls in a slideshow and presentation 7 p.m. April 10 at the Pajarito Environmental Education Center.
    There are hundreds of waterfalls in the Land of Enchantment, yet very few people know this. Attendees of Scott’s talks are always greatly inspired to become “Waterfall-lovers” and begin “Waterfalling” immediately.
    At this event, Scott will also sign all four of his outdoor books for those interested: “Taos Waterfalls,” “Taos Mountains,” “New Mexico Waterfalls” and “New Mexico Waterfall Handbook.”
    At age 20, Scott was the first commercial whitewater river outfitter in New Mexico in 1972. Scott was also the founder of Taos Mountain Outfitters in 1972. He has been a New Mexico guide and outdoor enthusiast since moving here in 1957.
    The program is free to attend, and no advance registration is required.

  • Among those I have taken to lunch over the years, I can now add a llama to my list. My dining companion, K-2, was one of six llamas that accompanied our small group on a recent day trek with in Northern New Mexico.
    A handsome blonde and statuesque creature with plenty of personality, K-2 was ever-alert and curious as we hiked the trails in the Columbine Hondo Wilderness Area of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains. 
    I led my trusted wooly friend through the dense woods, over bridges and into the gentle creeks within this picturesque and unspoiled wilderness. With his leather padded, two-toed feet and natural agility, he walked with a self-possessed air, exuding confidence as he navigated the terrain without faltering, while carrying a load of gear.
    “Llamas are the perfect low-impact, high altitude pack animal,” said Stuart Wilde, owner and head wilderness guide of Wild Earth Llama Adventures. “They are sure-footed because they have the perfect ‘mountain moccasins’ — like mountain goats — and they have little impact on fragile wilderness trails. They exemplify the ‘leave no trace’ ethic we practice and teach out here.”

  • The Harwood Museum of Art in Taos is hosting a number of art, educational, and cultural activities for all ages to kicked off the spring season this weekend, with a panel discussion of contemporary art in Northern New Mexico, and continuing through April 18 with a jazz concert.
    “We’re thrilled that we could offer the community our popular children’s education programs, lectures, films, and musical presentations,” said director of public programs, Rebecca Aubin. “Many of these events give us an opportunity to showcase our state-of-the-art Arthur Bell Auditorium. These programs have been gaining popularity throughout the years and we plan on continuing with this growing tradition. We want the community to know that the Harwood Museum of Art is the place to come in Taos for all your art, learning, history and cultural experiences.”
    The events were kicked off by artists Jonathan Blaustein, Nina Elder and Debbie Long, who focused on contemporary art in Northern New Mexico during a panel discussion. Their work is currently on display, which demonstrates a new trend in how artists are using their art as a medium to talk about planet earth and regional landscapes.

  • SOMOS Celebrates Nat’l Poetry Month with Two-Week Poetry Event in Taos, now through April 12.
    To celebrate National Poetry Month in April, the Society of the Muse of the Southwest (SOMOS) is hosting 12 evenings of poetry readings led by 36 poets — many who live in Taos — until April 12. All readings will be at the SOMOS Salon room beginning at 7 p.m.
    The series is free, however, donations to SOMOS are appreciated as are all purchases of poetry books. The series has been curated by Taos poet and co-editor of “Taos Journal of International Poetry and Art,” Veronica Golos.
    “Taos and the surrounding area have a plethora of award winning, spoken word, poets with books,” Golos said. “We will hear from a variety of poets including young poets, firmly established poets, newer poets, formal poets, experimental poets, poets reading Shakespeare, poets reading their own translations, etc. We hope that the Taos community will be generous with their attendance, their donations, and will support poets by buying their books! It has been a great pleasure working with SOMOS curating this event.”
    All poetry readings will take place at 7 p.m. at the SOMOS Salon, unless otherwise noted. A schedule of appearances is as follows: