.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's Features

  • November is Native American Heritage month. An additional focus takes place the day after Thanksgiving, called Native American Heritage Day.

    Jessica “Jaylyn” Atsye of the Laguna Pueblo began an event in 2010 called Rock Your Mocs Week. This year the week takes place Nov. 12-18. It will be the third year Los Alamos supports the effort by Rockin our Mocs.

    It is a chance for Native Americans, both youth and adults, from all backgrounds, to wear their moccasins for a day or the week and share their pride and culture. The traditional moccasins are as different as the people who will wear them.

    A friend of mine, Deb Minyard from Pojoaque High School, received a pair as a gift when she was the 2015 New Mexico Teacher of the Year. Her student, Nessa, asked if she could give her a handmade pair as a gift. When Minyard accepted, the student measured her feet in the traditional way, by tracing them.

    The handmade moccasins were crafted by Bernard Mora of the Tesuque Pueblo. The beautiful gift brought Minyard to tears, making her feel like a part of the student’s family. Minyard considers the gift one of her most treasured possessions.

  • Fees at many recreation sites and amenities at the Santa Fe National Forest will be waived over Veterans Day weekend on Saturday and Sunday.

    Fees at all national forests and grasslands will be waived at many day-use sites, such as picnic grounds and developed trailheads, in cooperation with other federal agencies under the Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement Act.

    Other agencies also participating in the fee-free days including the National Park Service, Bureau of Land Managements and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

    The fee-free availability includes sites in the Santa Fe National Forest which normally charge day-use fees and campgrounds. Site on the National Reservation System are not fee-free, according to a press release from the Santa Fe National Forest.

    If you plan to visit, “know before you go,” by checking the weather forecast and being prepared for seasonal fluctuations.

    Follow basic safety precautions for hiking, fishing and camping in the national forest.

    Although fire danger is somewhat lower, campfire safety and prevention is always a priority while outdoors, according to the press release.

    Never leave a campfire unattended and make sure it is out and cold before leaving your campsite.

  • The Los Alamos VFW Post 8874 will hold a Veterans Day Ceremony at 11 a.m. at Ashley Pond to honor veterans Saturday. The special ceremony will include a color guard and trumpet player.

    Following the ceremony, the public is invited to the VFW for a celebration, at 1793 Deacon St., Los Alamos.
    The American Legion Frank G. Frainier Post 90 in Los Alamos is planning a steak dinner and live music night on Veterans Day Saturday.

    Legion members, the public and anyone eligible for membership is welcome for the steak dinner that starts at 4 p.m. in the dining hall at 1325 Trinity Drive, said Commander Linda Fox.

    The dinner costs $15 for a ribeye steak, loaded baked potato, salad, roll, dessert and soft drink. To reserve a dinner, call the American Legion at 662-7772 before 8 p.m. Thursday.

    Following the dinner, members and anyone eligible to join the legion – which includes anyone who was in the military, or parents, or siblings of those in the military – can stay for the live music that starts at 6 p.m. in the bar area.

    Bat Bennett, a well-known musician, will play his special mix of tunes in the bar.

    “People really get involved,” Fox said. “He’s really a very good entertainer.”

  • The Los Alamos County Ice Rink’s is set to open its winter season with a free skating lessons event at 11:30 a.m. Nov. 15.

    Free mini-skating lessons will be free for children 10 and under from 1:30–2 p.m. and children  11 to adult can try free lessons from 2:15–2:45 p.m.

    Registration for skate lessons is now open online or available at the Walkup Aquatic Center.

    Prior to opening day, contact the PROS Division at 662-8170, visit the website at losalamosnm.us (click on Recreation) or email lacrec@lacnm.us for more information.

  • By MATT O'BRIEN, AP Technology Writer

    Don't throw away your Stephen King collection just yet. But the Master of the Macabre might want to keep an eye out behind him, because scientists have just unleashed a nightmare machine on a mission to churn out its own bone-chilling tales.

    MIT researchers have applied the electrodes and brought to life a new fiction-writing bot they call Shelley — after "Frankenstein" author Mary Shelley. To keep the bot busy — no wandering the countryside terrorizing villagers! — the team gave it a crash course in the horror genre, forcing it to read 140,000 stories published by amateur writers on a popular online forum.

    Now Shelley's artificial neural network is generating its own stories , posting opening lines on Twitter, then taking turns with humans in collaborative storytelling.

    COLD, CALCULATING HORROR

    "She's creating really interesting and weird stories that have never really existed in the horror genre," said Pinar Yanardag, a postdoctoral researcher at the MIT Media Lab. One strange tale, for instance, involved a pregnant man who woke up in a hospital.

  • Here are the newest members of the community born at Los Alamos Medical Center:

    Oct 19: A boy, Leo Timothy Uhlenbrock, was born to Emily and Kyle Uhlenbrock.

    Oct. 20: A boy, Owen Iefan Griffith, was born to Lauren and Gareth Griffith.

    Oct. 22: A boy, Tycho Rook Lanza Williams, was born to Nina Lanza and Richard Williams.

  • Children and adults may love the spooky traditions of Halloween, but our pets are less likely to appreciate the costumes, masks and parties associated with Halloween night.

    Kit Darling, infection control coordinator at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, recommended a few tips to keep your pet safe this Halloween.

    “Keep candy secure from pets,” Darling said. “Many candies are toxic to pets, such as chocolates. Candies and gum containing the sugar-free sweetener xylitol are also toxic.”

    Additionally, lollipops and other candies with plastic wrappers can cause intestinal blockage if ingested, Darling said. Be sure to clean up candy trash and store candy on a high shelf to prevent pets from reaching it.

    Other items to keep away from your pets include candles, pumpkins, pumpkin seeds, corn, lights and electrical cords.

    These objects are a hazard if consumed or chewed on by your pet. If you suspect your pet has ingested a dangerous item, Darling recommended contacting the Animal Poison Control Center at 888-426-4435 or your veterinarian.

    Pet owners may want to dress their pet for Halloween night, but this may not be the best idea. Darling said pets shouldn’t be dressed in costume unless you know they are comfortable wearing the outfit.

  • Powerball didn’t work out for you this week. You picked the wrong color combo for your unicorn look. They closed the highway before you got through the construction zone.

    There’s bad luck all over.

    Here’s a tip.

    The puppy Morello over at the Los Alamos County Animal Shelter could be the best thing that’s happened to you in quite awhile.

    His charm is his youth, and potential.

    A mixed breed with terrier traits, he’s a small puppy likely to reach medium proportions.

    He’s got a cute ear fold happening and appears genuinely interested in what comes next.

    He’s got some of his shots, not all, and he’ll need boosters.

    Consider making Morello part of your universe. Bad luck doesn’t last long when you’ve got a friend.

    Please contact the Los Alamos County Animal Shelter at 662-8179 or email at Police-psa@lacnm.us.
     

  • If Halloween is spooky for you, just think of it from a dog’s perspective: Costumed creatures, sugary treats and things that go “boo” in the night — oh my. These simple precautions from the Santa Fe Animal Shelter, however, can make the festive event fun.
    • Watch out for candy. Chocolate in all forms can be very dangerous to dogs and cats. And some candies contain the artificial sweetener xylitol, which can also cause problems. Pumpkins and corn might not be life-threatening but can upset stomachs.
    • Lighted pumpkins are fun but be careful that Fido doesn’t knock over all your work and start a fire. And curious kittens run the risk of getting burned by candles.
    • Dress-up can be fun for critters, but not all of them love it as much as you do. Watch the stress level, and only put on costumes that don’t restrict movement or hearing or impede the ability to breathe, bark or meow. Consider a colorful bandanna if all else fails.
    • Keep dogs and cats in a separate room away from the front door during peak trick-or-treating hours. Too many strangers can be stressful.
    • If you can’t resist bringing your critter along for trick-or-treating, make sure he or she can be seen from the road.