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Today's Features

  • If you’ve noticed your pet’s eye lenses becoming cloudy or opaque, your pet could be developing cataracts. Though cataracts can decrease vision, or even cause complete blindness, not every companion animal that develops cataracts requires surgery. Dr. Lucien Vallone, clinical assistant professor at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, explained how cataracts can affect pets.
    “A cataract is an opacity of the lens,” Vallone said. “A clear lens is necessary for good vision; thus, any opacification can cause decreased vision. However, not all cataracts are the same. Some cases of cataracts are so severe they can cause blindness and inflammation in the eye, which may cause significant discomfort. Some cases are small enough they don’t interfere with vision at all and should be monitored.”
    All companion animals can develop cataracts, but Vallone said cataracts are common in dogs. Several breeds of dogs may be predisposed to cataracts, though not every dog within these breeds are affected.

  • April 29-May 6
    For information, call the Betty Ehart Senior Center (BESC) at 662-8920, the White Rock Senior Center (WRSC) at 672-2034 and “Day Out” (adult day care, 8 a.m.-4 p.m.) at 661-0081. Reservations: by 10 a.m. for lunches.

    Betty Ehart

    MONDAY    
    8:45 a.m.         Cardio
    9 a.m.        Pilates
    9:45 a.m.        Matter of Balance Class
    10 a.m.        Senior Civic Discussion             group
    11:30 a.m.        Lunch: Chef Salad
    6 p.m.        Argentine Tango Dancing
    7 p.m.        Ballroom Dancing
    TUESDAY
    8:45 a.m.        Variety Training
    11:30 a.m.        Lunch: Hamburger with             Cheese
    1 p.m.        Party Bridge
    7:30 p.m.        Table Tennis
    WEDNESDAY    
    8:30 a.m.–1 p.m.    NO LAVA Quilters

  • The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, (505) 662-8179, has a great selection of adoptable pets just waiting for their forever home, so come adopt your new best friend today! All adoptable pets are micro-chipped, spayed or neutered, and up-to-date on vaccinations. Shelter hours are 12–6 p.m. Monday through Friday, 11 a.m. – 4 p.m. Saturday, and 12–3 p.m. Sunday.
    Be sure to check out our website at lafos.org, where you can get more information about volunteering, adopting, and donating.
    CATS
    Mr. Whiskers—A big tabby cat that is about 4 years old. Changes are a bit stressful for him, so he will likely need a little bit of time to adjust to his new home. He can be independent, but he’s also very sweet and likes to snuggle when he’s in the mood! He is OK with mellow cats, but other dominant males sometimes bother him.
    Wally—A handsome and regal 3-year-old tabby. He has beautiful, inquisitive eyes that draw in volunteers and shelter visitors, and he loves when volunteers open his kennel to pet him. Wally came to the shelter as a stray, so we don’t know much about his history, but he’s excited about finding a home that will keep him inside and make him part of the family.

  • On a beautiful spring Saturday morning, a few local ladies (and a few men) gathered in the Memorial Rose Garden with Extension Officer Carlos Valdez to learn tips and tricks for pruning rose bushes. The New Mexico State University Cooperative Extension Service has been working with the Garden Club every year for 30 years on this particular talk.
    “It’s been a great relationship that we’ve had,” Valdez said, and thanked the Garden Club for providing all the beautiful roses in the garden. The Los Alamos Garden Club has been in place since the mid-1940s and has taken care of the Memorial Rose Garden since 1957.
    Although the workshop focused on pruning rose bushes, Valdez began the morning with general information concerning planting and rose care.
    Extra tip: It is best to ease into the growing season with water and fertilizer. In the same way, ease out of the season gently with those things.
    Plantings Roses: To explain most of his tips, Valdez used the example of bare root roses. “Find yourself a reputable rose supplier. You want to purchase the highest grade of rose that you can get,” he said. Once the rose bush is purchased, soak overnight in a bucket of water and plant it the following day.

  • Green thumbs moving to Los Alamos often get a shock. Not only is the soil difficult to work with, but the water situation is a little tough, too.
    One can go all winter without a drop and a very expensive water bill, and then suddenly wake up to a deluge when the spring arrives. It can destroy all the hard work of nursing that flower or vegetable garden through yet another tough year. With the lowest annual precipitation count of six inches and a high of 30(!) inches, New Mexico is indeed a land of contrasts.
    So.. what to do? The New Mexico State University Los Alamos County Cooperative Extension Office suggests the key to lessening water bills and frustrations is to just go with the flow. Instead of planting Touch Me Nots, Black-Eyed Susans and Spiderworts, try for something a little closer to home, plants native to New Mexico that are just as pretty and can thrive on little to no water.
    For vegetable gardening, a little research into how the Native Americans thrived up here on the Pajarito Plateau can go a long way. They did it on just a little water and very little work. The Three Sisters technique has been used by the pueblo indians for centuries. They discovered that planting beans, squash and corn together results in a garden that’s virtually maintenance free, even in the driest and toughest of conditions.

  • The United Church of Los Alamos and the Universalist Unitarian Church will host a joint program at 9:30 a.m. Sunday, during its services, hosted by the youth.

    The youth were part of the recent delegation that spent their spring break with adult counterparts in Puerto Penasco, Mexico. The group built an incredible three homes in a one-week time period, changing the lives of three Mexico families forever.

    “Our kids in LA are great kids, always enjoy being around them in any setting,” said the Reverend Keith Lewis, the Pastor for Youth and Congregational Ministries, at the United Church. “This bunch especially, no gripes or complaints, just good old fashion sweat and hard work.”

    After a long journey and an overnight stay on the floor of a Phoenix church, the teams crossed the border, unpacked their campsites and prepared for the work ahead. The work includes mixing concrete by hand for the three build sites, followed by framing day, roofing day and stucco day. The final day was a beautiful bilingual passing of the keys to a new home, the first set of keys they have ever owned.

    According to Lewis, their hard work was so well done that teams not only finished their daily projects on time each day, but on some days, even finished early.

  • TODAY
    Join the Los Alamos History Museum for an exhibit opening from 3-5 p.m. Friday in the Los Alamos History Museum Rotating Gallery. Culture and Collaboration: The Los Alamos/Japan Project explores the goals of this unique intercultural initiative to create understanding through shared history, partnerships, dialogue, multiple perspectives, and collaboration. On display through July 9.

    Astronomy Show: Solar System Revelations
at 7 p.m. at the Nature Center. Dr. Galen Gisler uncovers new revelations about our Solar System. Cost is $6 for adults, $4 for children.
    SATURDAY
    Earth Day Festival from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. at the Nature Center.
Join us to celebrate Earth Day at the Los Alamos Nature Center, where there will be engaging activities, fun entertainment, and delicious food. Free.
     
    Saturday to March 5:
Earth Day Feature Film: We are Stars
at 12:30 p.m. at the Nature Center. This exciting, family-friendly film connects us to the evolution of the Universe and explores the secrets of our cosmic chemistry. Cost is $6 for adults, $4 for children.

  • TODAY
    Astronomy Show: Star Stories - Color
at 7 p.m. at the Nature Center. Cost is  $6 for adults, $4 for children.

    Fish Fry Friday from 5-7 p.m. at Immaculate Heart Mary Parish Hall, 3700 Canyon Road. Cost is $10 for Adults, $7 for children.

    Middle-schoolers invited to participate in Dance For A Cure at 7:30 p.m. at the Los Alamos County Sheriff’s Posse Shack. Cost is $5. Pizza while supplies last. Benefits the American Cancer Society.
    SATURDAY
    Feature Film: “Sea Monsters, A Prehistoric Adventure” at 2 p.m. at the Nature Center. 
Cost is $6 for adults, $4 for children.
     
    Coffee with the Warden
from 10:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. at the Nature Center. Bring wildlife questions and talk with the local Game & Fish warden Amos Smith. Free.
    SUNDAY
    Feature Film: Sea Monsters, “A Prehistoric Adventure” at 2 p.m. at the Nature Center. See prehistoric sea creatures come to life, and follow fossil hunters to remote locations as they excavate the remains of some of the most awe-inspiring creatures of all time. Cost is $6 for adults, $4 for children. More information at peecnature.org.
     

  • The Los Alamos Nature Center is ending the month with a star workshop at 7 p.m. April 28 and an exciting astronomy film “Phantom of the Universe” at 2 p.m. April 29 and 30.
    The Friday star workshop is a family-friendly two-hour program that starts by charting the major constellations in the planetarium. Then, weather permitting, participants will practice identifying objects and constellations outside the nature center. Educator Jon Lorenz will weave Greek and Southwest Native American star legends of the visible constellations in view. Space is limited. Visit peecnature.org/planetarium to register.
    “Phantom of the Universe” is a full-dome planetarium show that showcases an exciting exploration of dark matter, from the Big Bang to its anticipated discovery at the Large Hadron Collider. This film will play at 2 p.m. on both Saturday and Sunday.

  • This month’s Military Order of the World Wars Chapter 229 meeting will start at 6 p.m. Tuesday at the Los Alamos Research Park the second floor conference room.
    The speaker will be Rep. Stephanie Garcia-Richard. She will be reporting on actions taken in this year’s annual New Mexico legislative session.
    The meeting will begin with a social period, followed by a brief business meeting and dinner at 6:25 p.m. The presentation will begin at about 7:15 p.m.
    The Military Order of the World Wars dinner meetings are open to interested citizens for the dinner and program with RSVP, or the program only at no cost. The Hot Rocks Java Café staff will be catering the dinner: Pork tenderloin and appropriate side dishes. Cost of the dinner is $25 per person. A dinner reservation made is a commitment to the chapter to pay for the reserved dinner(s). RSVP either with a yes or no for the dinner by Sunday.
    Call LTC Gregg Giesler, USA Retired, Chapter Commander, 662-5574 (g.gieslercomputer.org) or Eleanor Pinyan, 672-3750 (email: depinyan@cybermesa.com).