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Today's Features

  • TODAY
    The Arts Council will host the April Brown Bag Performance at noon in the Pajarito Room of Fuller Lodge. Piano virtuoso Juanita Madland will present compositions by J.S. Bach, Mozart, Chopin, Schubert, Schumann, Ginastera, and an original piece. This concert will also be presented in Minneapolis in May. This spring Juanita will play her fifth harpsichord concert.
    THURSDAY
    Gardening for Backyard Birds
from 7-8 p.m. at the Nature Center. Learn from Master Gardeners how to invite birds to your yard and garden. Free.
    FRIDAY
    Fish Fry Friday from 5-7 p.m. at Immaculate Heart Mary Parish Hall, 3700 Canyon Road. Cost is $10 for Adults, $7 for children.

    The Jemez Thrift Store will have a bag day from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. today.

    Tour of the Friedman Recycling Facility from 8:30-4 p.m. at the Nature Center.
Tour New Mexico’s state of the art recycling facility. Free. Lunch available for $13 or $14.

    Gentle Walks
at 9 a.m. at the Nature Center. A gentle walk for which the emphasis is on discovery, not mileage gained. Free.
     
    April Night Sky Show
 from 7-8 p.m. at the Nature Center.
Discover and identify objects visible in our night sky this month, and enjoy their beauty from our planetarium. Cost is $6 for adults, $4 for children.
    SATURDAY

  • Parents of incoming students are encouraged to attend the upcoming Kindergarten Round-Up Wednesday at all Los Alamos elementary schools. Children who turn 5 years old by Sept. 1 are eligible to be enrolled in kindergarten for the 2017-2018 school year.  
    Kindergarten Round-Up is an important step in the pre-registration process for parents and students alike, as it gives them an idea of what to expect for their first year of elementary school.
    Parents and their children will get the opportunity to meet teachers, principals and other key school personnel.  
    The soon-to-be kindergartners also have the chance to visit a classroom in order to become familiar with the learning environment and the teaching materials used throughout the school year.
    Parents can call the school in which they are zoned for further questions regarding Kindergarten Round-Up.  
    The first day of school is Aug. 17.
    The contact numbers are: Aspen, 663-2275; Barranca Mesa, 663-2730; Chamisa, 663-2470; Mountain, 663-2325; and Piñon, 663-2680.

  • Chandra Anne Kluk and Jon Peter McDonald were married Aug. 13, 2016, at the Immaculate Heart of Mary Parish in Los Alamos.  
    Father Glenn Jones, of IHM, presided over the double-ring ceremony with Deacons John Sutton and John Heal assisting.
    Brandon Kluk, brother of the bride, and Diana McDonald, sister of the groom, sang “Set me as a Seal” during the lighting of the Unity Candle.  
    A reception followed at Cottonwoods on the Green, which included a dinner catered by Pawel and Dorota Listwan, slide show, photo booth, and dance featuring DJ Matt from Sounds Productions.  
    The wedding colors were coral and grey and the beautiful floral arrangements were provided by Flowers by Gillian.
    Emily and Mike Kluk of White Rock are the bride’s parents, and Merle and (the late) Linda McDonald of Chandler, Arizona, are the groom’s parents. The bride was given away by her father.
    Nichole Kluk, sister of the bride, was the Maid of Honor.  Bridesmaids were Bethany Kluk, sister-in-law of the bride, and friends Celina Ayala, Erika Metcalfe, Lisa Pille, and Madeline Stephens. Jr. Bridesmaids were Madalyn and Michaela Kluk, nieces of the bride. Flower girl was Macyn Kluk, niece of the bride. The guestbook attendants were Diana and Mary, sisters of the groom.

  • March 15 — A boy. Brayden Layne Aragon. Born to Jessica Martinez-Aragon and Ernest C. Aragon Jr.
    March 21 — A boy. Aiden Talavera. Born to Elicia and Obed Talavera.
    March 24 — A boy. Corban Endeavor Smith. Born to Leanne and David Smith.

  • April 2-8
    For information, call the Betty Ehart Senior Center (BESC) at 662-8920, the White Rock Senior Center (WRSC) at 672-2034 and “Day Out” (adult day care, 8 a.m.-4 p.m.) at 661-0081. Reservations: by 10 a.m. for lunches.

    Betty Ehart

    MONDAY    
    8:45 a.m.        Cardio
    8:30 a.m.        Tax Preparation
    9:45 a.m.        Pilates
    10 a.m.        Senior Civic Discussion
    11:30 a.m.        Lunch: Fettuccine Chicken             Alfredo
    6 p.m.        Argentine Tango Dancing
    7 p.m.        Ballroom Dancing
    TUESDAY
    8:45 a.m.        Variety Training
    11:30 a.m.        Lunch: Salisbury Steak
    1 p.m.        Party Bridge
    1 p.m.        Party Bridge
    7:30 p.m.        Table Tennis
    WEDNESDAY    
    8:30 a.m.–1 p.m.    LAVA Quilters

  • The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, (505) 662-8179, has a great selection of adoptable pets just waiting for their forever home, so come adopt your new best friend today! All adoptable pets are micro-chipped, spayed or neutered, and up-to-date on vaccinations. Shelter hours are 12–6 p.m. Monday through Friday, 11 a.m. – 4 p.m. Saturday, and 12–3 p.m. Sunday.

    Be sure to check out our website at lafos.org, where you can get more information about volunteering, adopting, and donating.

    CATS
     
    Mr. Whiskers—A big tabby cat that is about 4 years old. Changes are a bit stressful for him, so he will likely need a little bit of time to adjust to his new home. He can be independent, but he’s also very sweet and likes to snuggle when he’s in the mood! He is okay with mellow cats, but other dominant males sometimes bother him.
    Lemon—A sweet older cat that was left at the front door of the shelter with no information or history. Lemon is currently in foster care receiving treatment for diabetes; her foster home reports that they call her Sugar, since she’s so sweet! When Lemon is feeling better, she’ll be looking for a mellow home that is understanding of the needs of a diabetic cat.

  • TODAY
    Nature Yoga and Trail Run
from 10:30 a.m.-12:45 p.m. at the Nature Canter. Practice yoga with Christa Tyson at the nature center, where you have a great view of nature. Optional: Arrive at 10:30 a.m. to join Christa for a pre-yoga run. Cost for yoga or run for $7/$5 for members; yoga and run for $12/$8 for members.

    Feature Film: “Phantom of the Universe” from 7-7:45 p.m. at the Nature Center. Explore dark matter, from the Big Bang to its anticipated discovery at the Large Hadron Collider. Cost is $6 for adults, $4 for children.
     
    Gardening for Pollinators
from 1:30-3:30 p.m. at the Nature Center. Join Master Gardener Kate Whealen and learn to select plants that support pollinators. Registration required. Cost is $10 or $8 for members.
    MONDAY
    Sleep Matters/Sleep Apnea and Treatment presentation at 2 p.m. on the third floor at Aspen Ridge Assisted Living, 1010 Sombrillo Court. Presenters are Dr. Roger Wiggins and Patricia Donahue, respiratory therapist of the SW Sleep Center. Refreshments served. No RSVP is necessary.  Los Alamos community, residents and families invited. Call Cynthia Goldblatt, community liaison at 695-8981 for information.

  • National Crime Victim’s Week is this week.
    Community collaboration efforts will take place for educational opportunities throughout the week and culminate in resource booths at both Smith’s locations from 1-5 p.m. Friday.
    Project partners will be on hand to answer questions and hand out free t-shirts while supplies last.
    To learn more, contact the Los Alamos Police Department Victim’s Assistant at 663-3511. No police report required.
    To learn more, visit VictimsofCrime.org.

  • Los Alamos Pony Club will host nationally renowned equestrian trainer and instructor Robert Taylor over the weekend of April 8-9.
    Community members are welcome to come and observe the event or participate in the mounted activities.
    Taylor, of TaylorMade Stables in Maryland (taylormadestables.com/robert-taylor.html), will be in town to coach show jumping and mounted games competitors of all levels. This has become an annual event for local riders, who greatly enjoy Taylor’s gruff humor and superb training skills.
    Taylor has been a fixture in the show jumping, competitive driving, foxhunting and mounted games communities internationally for many years, and his daughter Mackenzie won the International Mounted Games Association World individual Championship under-17 in 2012.
    Morning sessions for the Los Alamos clinic will be at the jump arena (behind the main rodeo facility), and focus on jumping skills for horse and rider, and then each afternoon the club will set up for mounted games practice.
    Mounted games participants can sign up to participate even on the same day of the clinic. Both English and Western tack is permitted, as long as everyone has helmets and boots.
    Audience members are welcome at no charge, but are asked to leave dogs at home or keep them leashed at all times for safety.

  • Easter is one of the most important days of the year for Christians. Easter Sunday is filled with symbolism and tradition, some of which harken back to early Christianity, while others trace their origins to paganism.
    The Easter Bunny and Easter eggs are two Easter traditions with less extensive histories. The Easter Bunny, according to sources including History.com, first arrived in America in the 1700s via German settlers who brought with them their tradition of an egg-laying hare called “Osterhase.” Children would make nests where the rabbit could lay its colored eggs. Eventually, the custom spread from Pennsylvania, where many German immigrants settled, to other areas around the country.
    Eggs are symbolic of new life and rebirth in many cultures. To Christians, eggs represent the resurrection of Jesus Christ.
    Another theory suggests that Christians were once forbidden to eat during the Lenten season preceding Easter. Therefore, Christians would paint and decorate eggs for Easter to mark the joyous celebration and cessation of penance and fasting.
    Even though these traditions have endured, Easter eggs themselves might not be so strong. This year, Easter celebrants may want to experiment with different materials that are more forgiving and more enduring than standard eggs.
    Wooden eggs