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Today's Features

  • As 2017 came to a close, Chartwell’s Food Services, the organization that feeds the staff and students for Los Alamos Public Schools, had a visit from an “elf.” This elf came to Chartwells through the help of an employee with a goal of helping to feed children.
    Director of Dining Services and Chef Mia Holsapple was asked how people could help kids in need of some assistance with lunch. To the surprise of many, there is a lot of need in our community and the donation was able to provide assistance to all of our local schools.
    The donor saw the need of many, especially single parents trying to find their way. “Her words were that she has been in the place of many people who have needed a hand up in life not a hand out,” said Holsapple. “She was blessed to be able to do this for others this time of the year.”
    The donation was used to assist a variety of students and in a variety of ways. The donor helped students by paying down balances, paying off balances and in some cases adding funds to accounts. Now more meals would be at the ready when students return to school next week.

  • The 2017 nominees are in for the Community Asset Awards, which will take place January 13.
    Thirty-eight nominees that live or work in our community have been nominated for accolades from 2017. One will win the biggest honor of the night, the prestigious Spirit of the West Award, named in honor of former County Councilor Jim West.
    “We’re excited once again to acknowledge the efforts of those that make our community better in many ways every day,” said Bernadette Lauritzen, executive director of Champions of Youth Ambitions (C’YA). The local non-profit welcomes nominations throughout the entire year with a special focus to get submissions between Thanksgiving and the winter holidays.
    The celebration has found a home in the Betty Ehart Senior Center for several years. That night nominees and a guest are invited for a variety of desserts to herald their accomplishments. A very limited number of tickets are sold to community members that would like to attend the occasion.
    Another annual celebration is that the nominees are unaware of who nominated them for the award and why until the actual celebration is held. Nominees are never made to speak to the large crowd gathered, but are made to stand with other nominees while their accolades are shared with the crowd.

  • The thought of removing a pet’s eye can be scary, but in some cases, eye removal is necessary to improve the pet’s quality of life. Dr. Lucien Vallone, a clinical assistant professor in the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, explained how eye removal can be beneficial.
    “Veterinarians and veterinary ophthalmologists perform an eye removal when an eye has become both painful and blinded by a disease that is unresponsive to medical therapy,” Vallone said. “The most common cause of this in dogs and cats is from a disease called glaucoma, which creates high pressure in the eye. Eye removal is also performed when an aggressive or malignant tumor invades the eye or nearby structures.”
    Having just one or no eyes may seem unpleasant, but most pets that have had one or both eyes removed experience a dramatic increase in their quality of life.
    “Most animals are experiencing chronic pain prior to eye removal, so most will respond postoperatively by displaying more energy and playfulness,” Vallone said. “Every animal is different, but most dogs and cats who have had one eye removed are behaviorally indistinguishable from their two-eyed peers.”

  • The public is invited to attend the fall prevention workshop “Stay on Your Feet:  Keeping your Balance and Preventing Falls,” a presentation at Aspen Ridge Lodge, located at 1010 Sombrillo Court.

    The presentation will be January 23, given by Robert Lee, PT, DPT, MA and director of LAMC Rehabilitation Services.

    No RSVP is needed to attend. Refreshments will be served on third floor of Aspen Ridge.

    For information, contact Cynthia Goldblatt, program manager and liaison, at 695-8981.

  • THURSDAY
    Nature on Tap: Recent Discoveries in Astronomy at 5:30 p.m. at the Nature Center.
Join local astronomers to discuss the latest findings in astronomy including gravitational waves and neutron star collisions. Free. More information at peecnature.org.

    LA Community Blood Drive from 11 a.m.-7 p.m. at the First Baptist Church Hall, 2200 Diamond Drive, by United Blood Services. Free.
    FRIDAY
    January Night Sky Show at 7 p.m. at the Nature Center.
Discover and identify constellations and planets visible in our night sky this month, and enjoy their beauty on our planetarium dome. Cost is $6 for adults, $4 for children.

    LA Community Blood Drive from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. at the First Baptist Church Hall, 2200 Diamond Drive, by United Blood Services. Free.
    SATURDAY
    Bird Walk: Los Luceros Historic Site at 6:30 a.m. at the Nature Center. Enjoy this rare and scenic birding opportunity with local expert Joe Fitzgibbon. Cost is $20 for members, $24 for non-members. A portion of your registration fee will be donated to Los Luceros.

    Feature Film: Incoming!
at 2 p.m. at the Nature Center. Discover what impacts from above can teach us about the history of our planet, the Solar System, and the Universe! Cost is $6 for adults, $4 for children. More information at peecnature.org.

  • Start the New Year with a Cowboy Pancake Breakfast.  The first breakfast of the year will be from 7-11 a.m.  Sunday at the Posse Lodge on North Mesa Road.

    The all-you-can-eat breakfast features a variety of pancakes plus eggs, sausage, bacon, coffee and juice. Adult breakfasts will cost $7, children 10 and under can eat for $4.

    This month, the proceeds from breakfast will benefit the Rotary Club of Los Alamos.

    The Rotary Club, which has been serving the Los Alamos community for over 50 years, plans to use the funds for improvements to the Quemazon Trailhead.

    Other projects supported by the club and the community’s generosity include providing pre-paid exam vouchers for UNM-LA students in the high school equivalency program; the LAHS Memorial Garden; vocational training for Delancey Street residents; transportation to swimming lessons for fourth-graders in the elementary schools; an active inbound and outbound Youth Exchange Student Exchange program and leadership camp for high school students; the Deborah Beene Music Awards; the LAHS Memorial Garden; picnic tables for PEEC; funding support for the Posse Lodge, FIRST Robotics, the Hilltalkers Speech and Debate; LA Makers, Boy Scouts, LA Cares, Family Strengths Network, the Senior Center, and PAC-8 after-school programs for middle-schoolers.

  • This month’s Nature on Tap, set for Thursday, will focus on the latest findings in astronomy, including gravitational waves and neutron star collisions.

    Local astronomers and astrophysicists Dr. Galen Gisler, Dr. Steve Becker and Dr. Paul Arendt, will provide an engaging discussion about gravitational waves, the creation of precious metals, black holes, neutron stars, the night sky and upcoming planetarium shows.

    Nature on Tap is part of a series of conversations about art, history, nature and science. Thursday’s discussion will be at 5:30 p.m. at UnQuarked Wine Room.

    Gisler was born under the dark and starry skies of eastern New Mexico and eventually found his way back to his home state. With a bachelor’s degree in astronomy from Yale University, and a Ph.D in astrophysics from the University of Cambridge (England), Gisler went on to postdoctoral positions at the Leiden University Observatory (Netherlands) and Kitt Peak National Observatory (Arizona).

    Arendt has a Ph.D in physics from Ohio State University. His working career was spent in Applied Research and Development of materials at LANL and also in commercial manufacturing.

  • As an actual Certified Prevention Specialist in the State of New Mexico, I would never tell anyone what to think or how to vote. I would, however, say that you shouldn’t be allowed to vote on something drug related unless you do your homework.

    If you are in a position to have an intern, a student, or a volunteer have them research the history of the drug. If other state’s have legalized it, someone should spend a considerable amount of time seeing how decisions have affected their community, and in what ways.

    Recently, I have seen how the news is calling the legalization of marijuana in California as, “California is going green.”

    As a speech communication major, the media literacy aspect is astounding to me. “Going Green,” has an all-natural, healthy connotation to it. I am curious, however, if the going green is all about the financial aspect of legalization?

    Remember we elect officials to be our voice, but it may soon be imperative to let your voice be heard on this issue. If New Mexico decides to legalize marijuana, we won’t have a say after the vote.

  • LOS ANGELES (AP) — Sue Grafton, author of the best-selling "alphabet series" of mystery novels, has died in Santa Barbara. She was 77.

    Grafton was surrounded by family, including husband Steven Humphrey, when she died Thursday after a two-year battle with cancer, her daughter, Jamie Clark, posted on the author's website.

    "Although we knew this was coming, it was unexpected and fast. She had been fine up until just a few days ago, and then things moved quickly," the posting said.

    Grafton began her "alphabet series" in 1982 with "A is for Alibi." Her most recent book, "Y is for Yesterday," was published in August.

    "Many of you also know that she was adamant that her books would never be turned into movies or TV shows, and in that same vein, she would never allow a ghost writer to write in her name," her daughter wrote. "Because of all of those things, and out of the deep abiding love and respect for our dear sweet Sue, as far as we in the family are concerned, the alphabet now ends at Y."