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Today's Features

  • The Dia de los Muertos show at Northern New Mexico College has become an annual tradition.
    Now in its fourth year, the show will once again feature 16 artists from Northern New Mexico and beyond, displaying their best interpretations of the Day of the Dead. The man behind the show is Española’s Toby Morfin. For the past few years, Morfin has curated the show, all in an effort to share his — and other artists’ — talent with valley residents and those from surrounding areas. This year, Española artist Cruz Lopez also helped curate the show.
    The type of work displayed is as varied as the artists that create it. A good portion of the artists have done the show before, but there are also some new faces this year. Rachel Montoya is one of the newbies. Montoya, a jewelry artist, collaborated with Arturo Montaño for this exhibit. But she’s no stranger to exhibiting her work. In fact, she won first place for jewelry at this year’s Spanish Market.
    “It’s nice to add her to the show,” Morfin said. He said the show continues to improve each year and has attracted a big audience.

  • The Hilltalkers are seeking volunteer judges for the 50th annual Speech and Debate tournament Friday and Saturday. This year, the tournament will be at Los Alamos High School.  
    If you have any questions or would like to volunteer, feel free to call coaches Janet Newton or Toni Batha at 663-2651 or 663-2540 or email Batha at m.batha@laschools.net, Newton at j.newton@laschools.net or judge coordinator Katie Haynes, at katie.haynes@comcast.net. Make sure to provide your contact information.
    Individual Events include Humorous Interpretation (HI), Dramatic Interpretation (DI), Extemporaneous Speaking (Extemp), Duo Interpretation (Duo), Duet Improvisation (Duet), Original Oratory (OO), Expository Speaking (Expos) and Oral Interpretation (OI).
    Debate Events include Policy Debate (CX), Lincoln-Douglas Debate (LD), and Public Forum Debate (PF).

  • Red Cross Babysitters Course
    The Family YMCA is now taking registration for the Nov.16 and 17 session of its American Red Cross Babysitters Course.
    The course is designed by the American Red Cross to prepare youth with training in babysitter safety, basic child care, safe play, first aid and critical emergency skills, essential professional, leadership and care-giving skills and how to manage real-life problems.
    The session will be from 4-8:30 p.m. Nov. 16 and from 1-5:30 p.m. Nov. 17. Participants must be aged 11-17 and complete both days of the session they register for in order to receive certification. Cost is $110, prices are set by Red Cross.

  • As Director of the Betty Ehart Senior Center and as a music therapist, Pauline Schneider sees both the difficulties dementia sufferers and their caregivers face daily and also how music and the arts can help people connect and enjoy the  arts’ effects.
    “I have worked with people in all phases of dementia and even those who seem to have stopped relating to the world around them, remarkably respond to music. One person, who hadn’t spoken for quite some time, began to sing along with a familiar tune from decades ago and knew all the words, stayed on key and stayed focused until it was over,” Schneider said.
    She invited Mary Yamada of the Los Alamos Retirement Community, who has worked with people with dementia for 15 years and Carol Meine of Mesa Public Library arts programming, to get together and create a pilot program for people with dementia and their caregivers to meet in a non-clinical setting to enjoy the arts together.

  • Today
    GeekOut Family Night will be from 5:30-8:30 p.m. upstairs, at Mesa Public Library. Bring your own games, or play theirs.
    Thursday
    NaNoWriMo (National Novel Writing Month) kicks off. Are you game to write 50,000 words in 30 days, a novel in a month? It can be done. Find out more at the kick-off party in the upstairs rotunda of Mesa Public Library, from 5:30-6:30 p.m.

    “Valles Caldera: The Movie, Part 1: The Science.” PEEC and Reel Deal Theater team up to show a brand new documentary about the Valles Caldera. Question and answer session after the showing with the director and LANL scientists that worked on the film. The film starts at 6 p.m. and is $10 for adults and $5 for kids at the door, with proceeds benefiting PEEC. Visit PajaritoEEC.org, call 662-0460 or email Programs@PajaritoEEC.org for more information.

    The Mesa Public Library Free Film Series continues at 6:30 p.m. with Woody Allen’s “Midnight in Paris.”

    The November meeting of the Los Alamos Master Gardeners will be at 7 p.m. at Fuller Lodge. The program will be open to the public.
    Friday

  • Carole Rinard, a local needlework master, received the Gold Thread Award on Oct. 28 at the 2012 national seminar of the Embroiderers’ Guild of America, at Buffalo Thunder Resort in Pojoaque.
    This annual award is given to individuals who have given freely of their time and talents to best exemplify the EGA mission of fostering the highest standards of excellence in the practice of the art of embroidery. Carole is being honored at both the regional and national level for her life-long dedication to fiber arts.
    Upon moving to Los Alamos in 1981, Rinard immediately became active in the Embroiderers Guild at the local, regional and national levels.
    She received the Rocky Mountain Region’s first Clare Award in 1989 for outstanding service to the region. In 2004, she was the chairperson of the EGA 18th National Exhibit, which opened in Los Alamos in April of that year. As an EGA Master Needlework Judge, she has judged fiber arts at venues throughout the country.
    Rinard has exhibited widely and won awards for her needlework in Kansas and New Mexico. In 1995, she was one of 100 EGA needle artists to be selected to stitch an ornament for the White House’s Blue Room Christmas Tree.
    The ornament “New Fallen Snow at the Santa Fe Opera” is in the permanent collection of the Executive Mansion, Washington, D.C.

  • Today
    “A Plan for All Seasons: Overview,” a presentation about developing and executing a long-term financial plan to address investment goals, will be from 5:30-7 p.m. at Fuller Lodge. RSVP to Ashleigh Mares, 986-0125 or amares@wradvisors.com.
    Wednesday
    Come to PEEC to see the creepy crawly creatures from The Harrell House of Natural Oddities. In addition to the insect zoo, there will be games, crafts and a spider hunting walk will be from 1-4 p.m. Free to PEEC members, $7 per child for non-members. No registration required. Visit PajaritoEEC.org, call 662-0460 or email Programs@PajaritoEEC.org for more information.

    GeekOut Family Night will be from 5:30-8:30 p.m. upstairs, at Mesa Public Library. Bring your own games, or play theirs.
    Thursday
    NaNoWriMo (National Novel Writing Month) kicks off. Are you game to write 50,000 words in 30 days, a novel in a month? It can be done. Find out more at the kick-off party in the upstairs rotunda of Mesa Public Library, from 5:30-6:30 p.m.

  • The League of Women Voters will have their monthly Lunch with a Leader at 11:45 a.m. Nov. 8 at Mesa Library.
    Their leader in November will be the new County Attorney Becky Ehler.
    After working in Alamogordo for 19 years as the city attorney and as the legal advisor to the City’s Department of Public Safety, she came to Los Alamos in June 2012 with her husband of 34 years.
    They purchased a house in White Rock where they live with the animals their kids left behind when they moved out.
    Ehler has worked in Gallup and Roswell and had brief experience with the federal government as a summer intern in a congressional office.
    Ehler thinks working in local government is the best  choice because of the increased opportunity to directly interact with residents.
    She also believes she has a better opportunity to make an impact on the community at this level. “ It’s very gratifying to be able to see the outcome of a project upon which I have worked and see the genuine benefit to the citizens at the end of the project.”
    The event is open to the public. To attend, call Karyl Ann Armbruster at 661-6605 or email her at kaskacayman@gmail.com. Food is ordered from the co-op.
    The meal includes a sandwich or soup or salad and half-sandwich and a cookie for $10.  

  • We are so close to the end of October, that we will look ahead to November and a focus on the asset category of empowerment.
    This asset category contains assets seven through 10 and include; community values youth, youth as resources, service to others and safety.
    The assets program was disappointed when our Night in Italy event was forced to cancel, due to low-ticket sales.
    Perhaps it was timing, perhaps it was cost or perhaps there were too many events on the calendar.
    What I do know is that 100 percent of time was donated to make the effort a go. The assets program didn’t spend a penny in cost to attempt this fundraiser.
    Our thanks to local caterer Jarda Belmonte, who had the gumption to try something new to benefit youth development programs in our community.
    On a positive note, our Smith’s Change For Change collection earned our program $175.75 in donations and for that, I thank you.
    Our reason for fundraising is to at least make an attempt at sustainability. This is a part- time program and with additional funds, we could do so much more.
    The second reason is that we started the year with a $5,000 reduction in budget and must always anticipate that to happen in consecutive years.

  • Alleged hauntings and ghost sightings of places where accidents and tragedies occurred is not uncommon. In fact, there are many places throughout the state that are said to be haunted, so it should come as no surprise that the New Mexico State Penitentiary’s Old Main facility is on that list — especially since it was the site of a vicious riot in 1980.

    Inmates at the Penitentiary of New Mexico, overtook prison guards in the early morning hours of Feb. 2, 1980. Fed up with airing grievances about overcrowding, substandard food and the treatment of some prisoners — that seemed to fall on deaf ears — they decided to take action.

    During a routine inspection in one of the dormitories, the inmates overtook four prison guards and took them hostage. They then went to another dormitory, where another four guards were taken hostage. They continued to take hostages until they had acquired a total of 12. 

    During their initial assault, they were able to gain access of the control center, where they were able to get keys for the five grill gates in the prison. What happened after that will forever be etched in New Mexico history. For 36 hours, prisoners and guards alike, were tortured, beat, stabbed and raped. There were also several overdoses after the rioters gained access to the prison pharmacy.