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Today's Features

  • THIS WEEK ON PAC-8
    Views expressed on programs shown on PAC8 do not necessarily reflect the views of the manager, staff, or board.

    Friday, August 24, 2012
    06:00 AM Democracy Now! – Live
    10:00 AM Democrary Now!
    11:00 AM  County Council Replay (8-21-12)
    03:00 PM Celebration of Aging
    04:00 PM Al Jazeera DC Bureau
    05:00 PM Democracy Now!
    06:00 PM Los Alamos Historical Society –“New Mexico’s Struggle for Statehood”
    07:00 PM Homestead Tour
    07:30 PM Spirituality Today
    08:00 PM Clear Heart, Clear Mind
    09:00 PM FSTV

    Saturday, August 25, 2012
    FSTV

    Sunday, August 26, 2012
    06:00 AM FSTV
    05:30 PM Key to the Kingdom
    06:00 PM Drawing Men to Christ
    07:00 PM United Church
    08:00 PM That Which Is
    09:00 PM Trinity on the Hill
    12:00 PM Free Speech TV

    Monday, August 27, 2012
    06:00 AM Democracy Now! LIVE
    10:00 AM Democracy Now!
    11:00 AM Spirituality Today
    11:30 AM The LA Times – Legislative Review with Jim Hall
    12:00 PM Army Newswatch
    12:30 PM Elizabeth Claire Project
    01:30 PM Summer Video Classess Showcase
    03:00 PM The David Pakman Show

  • The following restaurant inspection reports were provided by the New Mexico Environment Department.

    Los Alamos

    Bandelier Grill Restaurant/catering, 11 Sherwood Blvd.
    Date inspected: Aug. 17
    Violations: Five high-risk violations, two for improper holding — prep refrigerator in grill area has a temperature of 54 degrees on top and below; two violations for contaminated equipment — slicer and dicer has food product on it. Must be cleaned after each use; no sanitizer available. One violation for plumbing/waste disposal — need two-inch air gap for pipe draining into floor drain in bar area. Two moderate-risk violations for contaminated equipment — food items on floor, floor needs to be cleaned; refrigerator is not NSF, must be removed, can’t use. One low-risk violation for poor personal hygiene — food items stored directly on floor.
    Status of establishment: Approved, follow-up Sept. 1.

    Fabulous 50s mobile unit
    Date inspected: Aug. 14, opening
    Violations: None
    Status of establishment: Approved, no follow-up required.

    Fabulous 50s Diner, 1325 Trinity Dr.
    Date inspected: Aug. 17

  • Los Alamos Little Theatre and Teatro Paraguas of Santa Fe are teaming up to produce a New Mexico Statehood Centennial Event in Los Alamos. “Parted Waters” by local playwright, Robert F. Benjamin, will be produced at  2 p.m. Sunday at the Los Alamos Little Theatre. The performance will be directed by Fran Martone, who starred in the Los Alamos production of “Time Enough” and directed “Galileo’s Footsteps” and “Manhattan Glass” at the 2011 Atomic Theatre Festival. “Parted Waters” is a drama about three generations of a Crypto-Jewish, Hispanic family struggling with its identity in Northern New Mexico. Admission at the door is by donation, with a suggested amount of $10. For more information, visit teatroparaguas.org.

  • In the Northern New Mexico mountain communities of Angel Fire, Taos, Raton and Las Vegas, Music from Angel Fire’s 29th Season will entertain audiences with chamber music through Sept. 2, in 15 concerts featuring works from the Baroque to the Contemporary periods.
    Included among the 2012 artists are Ida Kavafian, artistic director, violin; Ani Kavafian and Pamela Frank, violin; Anne-Marie McDermott, piano; Peter Wiley, cello; Tara Helen O’Connor, flute; Karen Lindquist, harp and Guillermo Figueroa, violin/viola among many others. Steven Stucky is the 2012 composer-in-residence.
    Stucky is the winner of the 2005 Pulitzer Prize for his “Second Concerto for Orchestra,” he is also a member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.
    Two themes will run through the 2012 Season of Music from Angel Fire. La Musique de la France — A Season Celebrating Great French Composers honors the 150th anniversary of the birth of the impressionist composer Claude Debussy and the 100th anniversary of the birth of composer Jean Françaix.
    Audiences can expect to hear works by French composers Debussy, Françaix, Poulenc, Saint-Saëns, Ravel, Fauré and Franck as well as compositions by masters from the baroque, classical, romantic and contemporary periods.

  • More than 20 authors and publishers will gather to sell their books Sept. 8 at Fuller Lodge, during the first Los Alamos Book Fair, sponsored by the Los Alamos Historical Society and its publishing venture, Bathtub Row Press.
    Between 9 a.m. and 2 p.m., shoppers can meet the authors, discuss their work or pick up a signed copy of a new release to tuck away for a holiday gift. Several recently released titles will be showcased, including Cindy Bellinger’s “Walking on Burnt Mountain, A Spiritual Quest in Los Alamos.”
    And for history buffs interested in the Manhattan Project, Don Farrell’s “Tinian, A Brief History,” has been reissued and will be available. Bathtub Row Press will have the newly-released soft cover of its award-winning book, “At Home on the Slopes of Mountains: The Story of Peggy Pond Church.”
    Shopping and refreshments await visitors to Fuller Lodge, followed by free tours of the Los Alamos Historic District at 3 p.m. for anyone interested in the stories associated with Ashley Pond, the Ice House Memorial and the log and stone houses of Bathtub Row, a preview of the proposed Manhattan Project National Historical Park.

  • Five Los Alamos households will open their yards to the public from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturday as part of the Master Gardener’s Tour.
    The tour is in its 10th year and is produced by the Los Alamos Master Gardeners, in conjunction with the Los Alamos Extension Office and Los Alamos Extension Agent Carlos Valdez.  Gardeners and homeowners looking for answers to questions about growing vegetables and flowers in the area, as well as those looking for landscaping ideas, might enjoy the tour.
    According to Master Gardener Denise George, it will include a variety of approaches to landscape design.
    “The gardens on this tour are very different. Some lots are large and others small. All five residential gardens feature outdoor living space, some have ponds and other water features, most incorporate vegetable areas into their gardens, some emphasize attracting birds and other wildlife, some were designed to require little maintenance,” George said.
    “Visitors should expect to leave with ideas that they might incorporate into their own landscapes. At each location, visitors will be able to ask master gardeners any questions they might have.”
    This year, the following residents will be make up the tour:
    • Shelby and Tony Redondo, 390 Manhattan Loop

  • Getting a grasp on the English language can be difficult, especially for those who were not brought up learning it. After all, there are so many things to consider, especially when words like cool have double meanings. Of course, there’s also words like their, there and they’re, to consider.
    Northern New Mexicans don’t make the task any easier. They seem to have a language all their own. It’s a fusion of American English and Castilian Spanish and produces terms such as acequia, mijo and patrón, which are mixed in with everyday English. It’s not uncommon to hear a native New Mexican speak Spanglish, a mix of English sprinkled with Spanish words here and there.
    While using Spanish terms is commonplace for most New Mexicans, it’s not so easy for tourists and those who have moved to New Mexico to understand the lingo. Until now.
    Mark H. Cross, a proofreader for the New Mexico Legislature, has written “Encyclopedia of Santa Fe and Northern New Mexico,” to help people understand the language and history of New Mexico.
    Cross’ tale of moving to New Mexico is not unique. Like many who fall in love with the Land of Enchantment, he came to visit a friend here and decided to make New Mexico his home. So in 1996, he made the move to Santa Fe and has lived there ever since.

  • Art comes in many forms and can be made out of anything an artist can think of. Now, Oregon native and New Mexico resident Nancy Judd is opening the eyes of fashionistas in and out of the state and letting them know the same can be said of fashion.
    Since 1998, Judd has been crafting fashions out of other people’s trash. She first got the idea while working in Santa Fe, as the city’s recycling coordinator.
    “I realized that art and fashion could be used to raise the consciousness of the public about recycling in a fun and positive way,” Judd said. “I started an event called the Recycle Santa Fe Art Market, that is still going strong.
    The opening night always features a recycled fashion contest and I would make a dress every year to promote the contest.
    Soon, I had a wonderful collection of recycled garments and I started to get invited by other recycling coordinators around the country to give recycled fashion shows in their communities.”
    She stopped doing fashion shows four years ago, because she said she realized she could “reach more people with my message of sustainability with exhibitions. I also wanted an audience that was not already environmentally minded.”

  • Kelley Kramer received a certificate of appreciation for service on the Juvenile Justice Advisory Board last month. Kraemer is now attending college.

  • Today
    The Los Alamos Community of Atheists will host a discussion from 6:30-8 p.m. in meeting room 1 of the Mesa Public Library. This month’s topic is “Mormon mythology, morality and Mitt. How benign are Mormon beliefs? How would a Mormon in the White House affect you?” Direct questions to losalamoscommunityofatheists@gmail.com.All are welcome.

    Thursday
    The Los Alamos Farmers Market will be from 7 a.m.-12:30 p.m. in the Mesa Public Library parking lot.

    Family Game Night at Mesa Public Library. Join the geeks and gamers from 5:30-8:30 p.m. in the upstairs rotunda for game boards galore. All ages welcome, please bring a parent or another adult if you’re 12 or younger.

    Wildflower Walk. Join Chick Keller, curator of PEEC’s Jemez Mountain Herbarium, for an easy walk to learn the names of local wildflowers.  A plant list will be provided so participants can keep track of what they see. Meet at PEEC at 5:30 p.m. to carpool or caravan to the trailhead. Free, no registration required. Visit PajaritoEEC.org, call 662-0460, or email Programs@PajaritoEEC.org for more information. In case of rain, meet inside PEEC for slide and plant identification discussions.