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Today's Features

  • ALBUQUERQUE — “The Case of the Indian Trader” (University of New Mexico Press) is the story of Billy Gene Malone and the end of an era.
    Malone lived almost his entire life on the Navajo Reservation working as an Indian trader; the last real Indian trader to operate historic Hubbell Trading Post.
    While Malone is at the center of this story, a more complex picture unfolds in federal agent Paul Berkowitz’s detailed account of how the National Park Service launched — and recklessly pursued — an investigation targeting Malone, falsely accusing him of a host of crimes. In 2005, Berkowitz was assigned to take over the year-and-a-half-old case.

  • The Los Alamos Historical Society is hosting a book signing and author talk with Robert J. Torrez and Robert Trapp, co-authors of Rio Arriba: A New Mexico County, on Tuesday, June 21, at 7:30 p.m. in the Pajarito Room of Fuller Lodge. The book signing is in conjunction with Homestead Day, part of the Summer Adventures in History and Science sponsored every Tuesday in June and July by the Los Alamos Historical Society and Bradbury Science Museum.
    Rio Arriba: A New Mexico County reviews the history of the area. The authors provide  an overview of its primordial beginnings, the Tewa peoples that established the county’s first permanent settlements, the role the Navajo, Ute, and Jicarilla Apache played in the region’s history.

  • Each year families anticipate The Santa Fe Opera’s popular Youth Nights at the Opera, a special program that allows them to attend final dress rehearsals at greatly reduced prices.  
    Since its inception in 1959, Youth Nights at the Opera have provided an opportunity for over 225,000 children and young adults to see professionally staged opera performances.  General Director Charles MacKay attributes his love of opera to his attendance at the very first Youth Night performance of “Die Fledermaus,” in 1959.

  • It’s a rare occasion when two theatres can come together to coordinate a show to bring to Los Alamos. It is even more rare when an actor from Albuquerque brings a show to Los Alamos,  which he plans to tour the country with, hoping to eventually end up on Broadway. Jim Cady of the Adobe Theater in Albuquerque has that goal for “The Unauthorized Afterlife of Eugene O’Neill.” Performances at the Los Alamos Little Theatre are a step toward helping him further realize that goal.
    “The Unauthorized Afterlife of Eugene O’Neill” just finished a run at Warehouse 21 in Santa Fe. There were two performances, both of which resulted in thunderous applause and standing ovations.

  • Today
    The Los Alamos Lions Club meets at 6 p.m. the first and third Thursday of each month. Those interested in the Lions Club should call Dennis Wulff at 672-9563 or email drwulff47@aol.com.

    The White Rock Family Friendly Film Series presents, “The North Avenue Irregulars,” at 7 p.m. in the White Rock Town Hall.

    The Democratic Party of Los Alamos will meet from 7-8:30 p.m. at the Mesa Public Library in Room 3. They will plan for several upcoming summer events.

    Saturday

  •     Greg Abate, considered one of the top saxophonists in the world, will play bebop jazz at 7 p.m. Friday at Ashley Pond as part of the Los Alamos County Summer Concert Series.
    After graduating from the Berklee College of Music in the mid 70s, he started his own ensemble called “Channel One,” but soon quit to play lead alto sax for the Ray Charles Orchestra.
    He stayed on with the orchestra for a couple of years then went back to his own band and sound, and then joined the Artie Shaw Orchestra, where he played tenor sax.
    However, he ran into problems with both bands because he was unable to improvise. The bands were too structured and Abate considered himself a very cool jazz musician.

  • What is a turtle’s favorite food? Does a snake feel smooth or rough? What does a scorpion look like under ultraviolet light? Join animal care expert Jennifer Macke from 10-11 a.m. June 24 at Pajarito Environmental Education Center for an informative class about the live animals on exhibit. Macke will discuss what each animal eats and share some facts about each one. The program will answer many questions about local reptiles and amphibians.
    Kids of all ages will get to touch and feed some of the animals. They will dig worms from PEEC’s worm farm, to feed Elf the turtle. They will compare how an animal’s skin is different, depending on whether it lives in water or on land.

  • Key Club President William Sky Korber, was awarded a Kiwanis scholarship. He will attend the Univserity of California at Berkeley and study pre-med.  His parents are Bette Korber and James Theiler. Pictured from left to right, Kiwanis President Fran Berting, Key Club Mentor Don Casperson, Bette Korber, William Sky Korber, James Theiler and Key Club Mentor Morrie Pongratz.

  • Students who will be enrolled in medical school for the fall 2011 semester are invited to apply for scholarship funds.
    Students are eligible to apply if they are residents of Los Alamos County or have spent the majority of their lives as residents of Los Alamos County.
    Applicants are required to write a letter about their medical school background, fill out a scholarship application form and send an official copy of their undergraduate and medical school transcripts
    Completed applications must be received by Dr. Frederica Smith’s office by Aug. 15, 2011. Contact Dr. Frederica E. Smith, Los Alamos Medical Center, 3917 West Road, Los Alamos, N.M. 87544 or call 662-9400 for forms and information.

  • Join PEEC and Dorothy Hoard on Saturday for a guided tour of Canyon de Valle in Los Alamos.
    This free hike will begin at 9 a.m. and will last for about five hours, though participants may hike only as far as they wish and return any time. 
    For four years, a dedicated team of dendrophiles (tree-lovers) has been scouring Los Alamos for the biggest tree of each species that appears in the county.
    Depending on their preferred habitat, the biggest trees range in elevation from a hackberry along the Rio Grande in White Rock Canyon, to an aspen near the ridgeline of the mountains above town.