.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's Features


  • THIS WEEK ON PAC-8
    Views expressed on programs shown on PAC8 do not necessarily reflect the views of the manager, staff, or board.

    Friday, September 28, 2012
    06:00 AM Democracy Now! – Live
    10:00 AM Democracy Now!
    11:00 AM County Council Replay (9-25-12)
    03:00 PM Celebration of Aging
    04:00 PM Al Jazeera DC Bureau
    05:00 PM Democracy Now!
    06:00 PM Los Alamos Historical Society
    07:00 PM Ice Cream Man
    07:30 PM Spirituality Today
    08:00 PM Clear Heart, Clear Mind
    09:00 PM FSTV

    Saturday, September 29, 2012
    FSTV

    Sunday, September 30, 2012
    06:00 AM FSTV
    05:30 PM Key to the Kingdom
    06:00 PM Drawing Men to Christ
    07:00 PM United Church
    08:00 PM That Which Is
    09:00 PM Trinity on the Hill
    12:00 PM Free Speech TV

    Monday, October 1, 2012
    06:00 AM Democracy Now! LIVE
    10:00 AM Democracy Now!
    11:00 AM Spirituality Today
    11:30 AM The LA Times – Legislative Review with Jim Hall
    12:00 PM Army Newswatch
    12:30 PM Elizabeth Claire Project
    01:30 PM Summer Video Classes Showcase
    03:00 PM The David Pakman Show
    04:00 PM Al Jazeera DC Bureau
    05:00 PM Democracy Now!

  • On a lazy afternoon, the last thing many people want to do is head to Santa Fe to look at galleries. The mention of the word can be enough to make some people look around for undone chores.
    However, Hillside Market, at 86 Old Las Vegas Hwy., has a range of services that might change some minds. With work from more than 30 New Mexican artists, antiques, a koi rescue area, a coffee shop and a large greenhouse, Hillside Market is appealing to people of all ages.
    Owners Tisha Sjostrand, Kate Sjostrand and Pam Fennell created a space for people to browse, have a cup of coffee, meet local artists, buy local produce and take a class or two. This is no high-pressure sales situation. Staff members and artists are available to give information, but customers can enjoy the items on display at their own pace, without being pushed or prodded, which is helpful, as there is so much to see.
    The variety of merchandise includes items one expects to see in art galleries, such as paintings and sculptures, but also includes jewelry, rugs, furniture and many old treasures. Another important facet of this business is that the artists are not from elsewhere, merely selling their work in New Mexico, so all purchases support New Mexico’s economy.

  • When out enjoying a leisurely lunch, incessant cell phone ringing can be annoying.
    It’s even worse when the cell phone won’t stop ringing and the owner won’t answer it. Jean (Kate Ramsey) found herself in that very situation in Los Alamos Little Theater’s presentation of “Dead Man’s Cell Phone,” directed by Gwen Lewis and produced by David Schiferl.
    Gordon (Eric Björklund) wouldn’t answer his phone. Not because he didn’t want to, but rather because he couldn’t. He was dead. He also happened to be sitting next to Jean in a café, while they were lunching. After unsuccessfully trying to talk to him, her response to silence the annoying contraption was to answer it. What happened after that was a bit strange.
    The cell phone became a part of her life. It constantly rang and she constantly answered it, even though she did not know the people on the other end. No matter where she was or what she was doing, she answered the phone.

  • On Oct. 5, four different organizations will keep their doors open into the evening to provide an inside view of the arts community.
    Mesa Public Library Art Gallery at 2400 Central Ave. celebrates the opening of “Unmute,” a traveling exhibition that explores the theme of how text and image developed new relationships in 20th century art, from 4-5:30 p.m.
    The exhibition includes many examples of artist’s books, but also other works in a wide range of media.
    “Unmute”  is an exhibition of works on paper from the permanent collection of the University Art Gallery at New Mexico State University that question the assumptions about the relationship of language and image in visual art.
    It explores in depth what happens when artists indulge the fundamental impulse to breach the supposed boundaries between the verbal and the visual.
    Also from 4-5:30 p.m., the Los Alamos Historical Society,1050 Bathtub Row, will feature photographs of Manhattan Project veteran Jack Aeby, who took the only known color photo of the world’s first atomic blast at Trinity Site. Their permanent exhibits feature all eras of Los Alamos history, including a section on post-war “Cold War” era Pacific testing, a domestic bomb shelter and more.

  • Mesa Public Library Art Gallery, with support from the Friends of Los Alamos County Libraries, will host a traveling exhibition that explores the theme of how text and image developed new relationships in 20th century art, including the closest form of that relationship, the artist’s book.
    The event is from 4-5:30 p.m. Oct. 5 and is part of the Arts Crawl Evening, which includes the Los Alamos Historical Museum, Fuller Lodge Art Center and Karen Wray Fine Art.
    The exhibition includes many examples of artist’s books but also other works in a wide range of media as well. Works by 52 artists, many of world renown, provide a strong showing of how text and image combine to make visually and intellectually compelling art. Sol Lewitt, Joyce Kozloff, Hans Haacke, Melissa Grimes, Jaune Quick to See Smith, Pat Steir, Carrie Mae Weems, to name a few, are among those artists whose work is included in the exhibit, one so fitting to be shown in a library. New Mexico institutions have treasures in their collections, a resource to share across the state and across institutional venues for all New Mexicans and visitors to enjoy.

  • Today
    The Los Alamos High School Band Boosters are hosting a “No Cook Noodle Night” from 5-7 p.m. at Trinity on the Hill’s Kelly Hall. With an eat-in or carryout option, the menu includes lasagna with meat and red sauce; spaghetti with a choice of meat or vegetarian sauce; penne with alfredo sauce (meatless); macaroni and cheese; and rice noodles with gluten-free Asian sauce. Dine-in meals include salad, bread and a cookie. Tickets are $8 for adults and $5 for children and are available in advance or at the door. For more information or to purchase tickets, call Maire O’Neill at 412-8739.

     Mesa Public Library presents Game Night at Mesa from 5:30-8:30 p.m. Bring your games or play theirs. For all ages.

    The Los Alamos Community of Atheists will discuss women in atheism from 6:30-8 p.m. in meeting room one of Mesa Public Library. Feel free to bring a favorite book, quotation or other contribution to free thought by women. All are welcome.
    Thursday
     The Los Alamos Farmers Market will be from 7 a.m.-12:30 p.m. in the parking lot at Mesa Public Library.

    Los Alamos High School NJROTC will host a brisket night from 5:30-7 p.m. at the Sheriff’s Posse Lodge on North Mesa. The cost is $10 per plate and supports the NJROTC in their competitions and activities.

  • Aiyeswaria Jeganathan was the 2012 Chalk Walk grand prize winner. The Chalk Walk is held annually in front of Fuller Lodge, as part of the Next Big Idea Festival

  • The students of the Los Alamos High School Naval Junior Reserve Officers Training Corps would like the community to assist their program by not just opening their wallets, but your mouths.
    The monthly Barbecue Brisket Night kicks off Thursday, remaining a steadfast fundraiser for more than three years.
    The menu will include barbecue brisket, a vegetable, potato, roll and dessert for $10 and will be served at the Sheriff’s Posse Lodge, from 5:30-7 p.m.
    LAHS Booster Club President Brenda Kelley explains how the fundraising opportunities throughout the community will help teams with their participation at competition.
    “This allows the instructors to concentrate on core instruction and training they provide to the cadets,” Kelley said. “The value gained by the additional activities can be measured by the many trophies, awards, ribbons and other formal recognition but the biggest and best prize is the positive experiences provide to the cadets.”
    The training and experience offered through the programs provides students with hands-on opportunities from serving others to achieving personal goals that fill lifetime learning experiences.
    For more information about the program, call 663-3227.

  • Former Los Alamos High School student William O’Donnell, has produced the film “Education is Hope,” tracing the impact of education in Kenya on students, their family and their community.
    There will be a free screening at 6 p.m. Saturday at the Reel Deal Theater.
    “Education is Hope” is a grassroots film that will transport the audience to a country where poverty and back-breaking labor can usually only be overcome by education.
    Education for young Kenyans is a sometimes elusive goal, hindered by the day-to-day responsibilities of maturing children to help support their families through hard labor. Dylan Westfall and O’Donnell embark on a journey through three months in Kenya.
    While living, sleeping and eating with the locals, they document the hardships and beliefs held among many Kenyan’s that only education can lift the poor, diseased and marginalized out of desperate circumstances.
    In the film, locals tell their stories, which illustrate that the hope of education is warranted. It shows that those who complete high school and some form of higher education find opportunities that would otherwise be non-existent.
    Meet the producers and Fredah, a Kenyan woman featured in the film, with a reception to follow.


  • ST. LOUIS (AP) — With a string of gold albums, a hit TV series and the signature "Moon River," Andy Williams was a voice of the 1960s, although not the '60s we usually hear about.

    "The old cliche says that if you can remember the 1960s, you weren't there," the singer once recalled. "Well, I was there all right, but my memory of them is blurred — not by any drugs I took but by the relentless pace of the schedule I set myself."

    Williams' plaintive tenor, boyish features and easy demeanor helped him outlast many of the rock stars who had displaced him and such fellow crooners as Frank Sinatra and Perry Como. He remained on the charts into the 1970s, and continued to perform in his 80s at the Moon River Theatre he built in Branson, Mo. In November 2011, when Williams announced that he had been diagnosed with bladder cancer, he vowed to return to performing the following year: His 75th in show business.